bookshelf by year

Breakpoint

February 12, 2010

breakpoint

author |
Richard A. Clarke
year published |
2007

Penguin Group | In his fiction debut, The Scorpion’s Gate, Richard A. Clarke, former counterterrorism czar for Presidents Clinton and George W. Bush, projected a world in 2010 in which the United States and China were competing politically and economically for a dwindling supply of increasingly expensive oil and gas.  That competition naturally took them to the Persian Gulf where the largest oil deposits remained, where the United States… read more

Cyber War: The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do About It

August 4, 2011

Cyber War book cover

author |
Richard A. Clarke, Robert K. Knake
year published |
2010

Amazon | Richard A. Clarke warned America once before about the havoc terrorism would wreak on our national security — and he was right. Now he warns us of another threat, silent but equally dangerous. Cyber War is a powerful book about technology, government, and military strategy; about criminals, spies, soldiers, and hackers. This is the first book about the war of the future — cyber war — and a convincing argument… read more

Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes

July 24, 2017

warnings-cover

author |
Richard A. Clarke, R.P. Eddy
year published |
2017

Warnings is the story of the future of national security, threatening technologies, the U.S. economy, and possibly the fate of civilization.

In Greek mythology Cassandra foresaw calamities, but was cursed by the gods to be ignored. Modern-day Cassandras clearly predicted the disasters of Katrina, Fukushima, the Great Recession, the rise of ISIS, and many more. Like the mythological Cassandra, they were ignored. There are others right now warning… read more

Armageddon Science: The Science of Mass Destruction

November 29, 2010

armageddonscience

author |
Brian Clegg
year published |
2010

Publisher’s Weekly | Clegg (Before the Big Bang) explores how runaway science and other disasters might destroy humanity. He begins with the much discussed but highly speculative concerns over the operation of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. The collider is designed to recreate energies equal to those existing at the time of the big bang, which some theorists say might create a chain reaction that would dissolve the… read more

Infrared Astronomy – Seeing the Heat: from William Herschel to the Herschel Space Observatory

November 1, 2016

infrared-astronomy-cover

author |
David L. Clements
year published |
2014

Uncover the Secrets of the Universe Hidden at Wavelengths beyond Our Optical Gaze

William Herschel’s discovery of infrared light in 1800 led to the development of astronomy at wavelengths other than the optical. Infrared Astronomy – Seeing the Heat: from William Herschel to the Herschel Space Observatory explores the work in astronomy that relies on observations in the infrared. Author David L. Clements, a distinguished academic and science… read more

The Coming Jobs War

November 17, 2016

coming-jobs-war-cover

author |
Jim Clifton
year published |
2011

Definitive leadership strategy for fixing the American economy, drawn from Gallup’s unmatched global polling and written by the company’s chairman.

What everyone in the world wants is a good job. “This is one of the most important discoveries Gallup has ever made,” says the company’s Chairman, Jim Clifton.

In The Coming Jobs War, Clifton makes the bold assertion that job creation and successful entrepreneurship are the world’s… read more

Power, Madness and Immortality

April 12, 2009

power madness immortality

author |
Mychilo Cline
year published |
2005

There has been increasing interest in the potential social impact of new technologies, such as virtual reality (as may be seen in utopian literature, within the social sciences, and in popular culture). Mychilo S. Cline, in his book, Power, Madness, and Immortality: The Future of Virtual Reality, argues that virtual reality will lead to a number of important changes in human life and activity. He argues that:

*… read more

Ready Player One: A Novel

October 20, 2012

ready_player_one

author |
Ernest Cline
year published |
2012

Young Wade Watts takes refuge in the OASIS, the “globally networked virtual reality” that nearly all of humanity relies on. It’s 2044, the year before the Singularity futurist Ray Kurzweil predicts will inextricably unite humans and computers. …  — Booklist Review

At once wildly original and stuffed with irresistible nostalgia, READY PLAYER ONE is a spectacularly genre-busting, ambitious, and charming debut—part quest novel, part… read more

Human Being @ Risk: Enhancement, Technology, and the Evaluation of Vulnerability Transformations (Philosophy of Engineering and Technology)

March 14, 2013

Human Being @ Risk

author |
Mark Coeckelbergh
year published |
2013

Whereas standard approaches to risk and vulnerability presuppose a strict separation between humans and their world, this book develops an existential-phenomenological approach according to which we are always already beings-at-risk. Moreover, it is argued that in our struggle against vulnerability, we create new vulnerabilities and thereby transform ourselves as much as we transform the world. Responding to the discussion about human enhancement and information technologies, the book then shows… read more

Fallout: The True Story of the CIA’s Secret War on Nuclear Trafficking

March 30, 2011

Fallout book cover

author |
Catherine Collins, Douglas Frantz
year published |
2011

Amazon | For more than a quarter of a century, while the Central Intelligence Agency turned a dismissive eye, a globe-straddling network run by Pakistani scientist A. Q. Khan sold the equipment and expertise to make nuclear weapons to a rogues’ gallery of nations. Among its known customers were Iran, Libya, and North Korea. When the United States finally took action to stop the network in late… read more

The Great Acceleration: How the World is Getting Faster, Faster

January 3, 2016

51Rsw+6CwVL

author |
Robert Colvile
year published |
2016

Instant messaging. Superfast broadband. High-frequency trading. The world is, undeniably, accelerating. Great acceleration of change is evident in all spheres of modern life.

In this revelatory study, Robert Colvile examines how and why this is happening, why it’s unlikely we’ll be able to slow down – and why this may be no bad thing. It’s a book peppered with slogans from this new world’s heavy hitters: Ried Hoffman, the… read more

Extreme Planets: A Science Fiction Anthology of Alien Worlds

March 19, 2014

713WnEs-wfL

author |
David Conyers, David Kernot, Jeff Harris
year published |
2014

Two decades ago astronomers confirmed the existence of planets orbiting stars other than our Sun. Today more than 800 such worlds have been identified, and scientists now estimate that at least 160 billion star-bound planets are to be found in the Milky Way Galaxy alone. But more surprising is just how diverse and bizarre those worlds are.

Extreme Planets is a science fiction anthology of stories set on… read more

Nano

December 4, 2012

Nano

author |
Robin Cook
year published |
2012

After a tumultuous year in which her mentor is murdered and her estranged father comes back into her life, Pia Grazdani, the embattled medical student from Death Benefit, decides to take a year off from her medical studies and escape New York City. Intrigued by the promise of the burgeoning field of medical technology and the chance to clear her head, Pia takes a job at Nano, LLC, a lavishly… read more

Robot Building for Beginners

February 3, 2011

Robot Building for Beginners Cover

author |
David Cook
year published |
2010

The book gives basics on the electronics needed for building a robot. It is a good guide for those who want to learn not only about robots at the beginning level but who are keen to know how to use a multi-meter and what and when to use a resistor. It can turn a beginner’s fear of robotic electronics into a robotic blast-off.

A Very Short Tour of the Mind: 21 Short Walks Around the Human Brain

August 14, 2013

book_a_very_short_tour_of_the_mind

author |
Michael C. Corballis
year published |
2013

Why do we remember faces but not names? If your brain were cut in half would you suffer more than a splitting headache? How does your dog remember where it buried its bone but you can’t find your keys? And do we really only use ten percent of our brains? In A Very Short Tour of the Mind, Michael C. Corballis answers these questions and more.… read more

close and return to Home