Recently Added by year publishedBy Author | A-Z

Memories With Maya

March 4, 2013

Memories with Maya

author |
Clyde Dsouza
year published |
2013

“It’s Complicated,” Daniel types, updating his profile’s relationship status on his social network. He’s just lost his girlfriend. Emotions after all are shared online. Daniel (Dan) breathes technology. He will stop at nothing to win her back.

His work involves creating AR. solutions for Real-Estate. The recession and an explosion of data-cops is drying out his streams of income. He turns to close friend, Krish, a researcher in… read more

Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence

October 30, 2013

Hardwiring Happiness

author |
Rick Hanson
year published |
2013

Why is it easier to ruminate over hurt feelings than it is to bask in the warmth of being appreciated?

Because your brain evolved to learn quickly from bad experiences but slowly from the good ones.

You can change this.

Hardwiring Happiness lays out a simple method that uses the hidden power of everyday experiences to build new neural structures full of happiness, love, confidence, and… read more

Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground Between Humans and Robots

September 7, 2015

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author |
John Markoff
year published |
2015

As robots are increasingly integrated into modern society—on the battlefield and the road, in business, education, and health—Pulitzer-Prize-winning New York Times science writer John Markoff searches for an answer to one of the most important questions of our age: will these machines help us, or will they replace us?

In the past decade alone, Google introduced us to driverless cars, Apple debuted a personal assistant that we keep in our… read more

Androids and Intelligent Networks in Early Modern Literature and Culture: Artificial Slaves

September 21, 2016

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author |
Kevin LaGrandeur
year published |
2012

Awarded a 2014 Science Fiction and Technoculture Studies Prize Honorable Mention.

This book explores the creation and use of artificially made humanoid servants and servant networks by fictional and non-fictional scientists of the early modern period.

Beginning with an investigation of the roots of artificial servants, humanoids, and automata from earlier times, LaGrandeur traces how these literary representations coincide with a surging interest in automata and experimentation,… read more

The Intelligent Universe: AI, ET, and the Emerging Mind of the Cosmos

June 29, 2011

Intelligent Universe book cover

author |
James N. Gardner
year published |
2007

Amazon | What is the ultimate destiny of our universe? That is the striking question addressed by James Gardner in The Intelligent Universe.

Traditionally, scientists (and Robert Frost) have offered two bleak answers to this profound issue: fire or ice.

The cosmos might end in fire — a cataclysmic Big Crunch in which galaxies, planets, and life forms are consumed in a raging inferno as the universe… read more

Our Robots, Ourselves: Robotics and the Myths of Autonomy

October 12, 2015

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author |
David A. Mindell
year published |
2015

“[An] essential book… it is required reading as we seriously engage one of the most important debates of our time.”—Sherry Turkle, author of Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age

From drones to Mars rovers—an exploration of the most innovative use of robots today and a provocative argument for the crucial role of humans in our increasingly technological future.

In Our Robots, Ourselves, David Mindell… read more

The Human Race to the Future: What Could Happen — and What to Do

May 14, 2013

The Human Race to the Future

author |
Daniel Berleant
year published |
2013

Who doesn’t wonder about the future… what things will be like some day, how long it might take, and what we can do about it?
This book gives possible answers, spanning from the current century to nearly eternity. Imaginative yet scientifically plausible, most chapters offer a concluding section discussing actions to take in view of the predicted future scenarios. Some of these actions can be done by individuals, others… read more

How I Accidentally Started the Sixties

November 7, 2014

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author |
Howard Bloom
year published |
2014

“Every page, every paragraph, every sentence sparkles with captivating metaphors, delightful verbal concoctions, alchemical insights, philosophic whimsy, absurd illogicals, scientific comedy routines, relentless, non-stop waves of hilarity. The comparisons to James Joyce are undeniable. Wow! Whew! Wild! Wonderful!”” Timothy Leary

The strangest memoir you will ever read.

You or your parents lived it. I helped start it. And it was an accident. It was the era of… read more

Words and Rules: The Ingredients of Language (P.S.)

November 26, 2012

Words and Rules

author |
Steven Pinker
year published |
2011

How does language work? How do we learn to speak? Why do languages change? Why do they have so many quirks? What does language reveal about the mind?

Steven Pinker explores the mysteries of language in this original and hugely entertaining book. Pinker uses a deceptively simple phenomenon—regular and irregular verbs—to illuminate an astonishing array of topics: the history of languages, what we can learn from children’s grammatical… read more

Accelerando

April 15, 2009

accelerando

author |
Charles Stross
year published |
2006

During the last five years, Stross has garnered a reputation as one of the most imaginative practitioners of hard sf. Expanded from several stories originally published in Asimov’s Science Fiction, Stross’ latest novel follows several generations of the Macx family through the rapidly transforming, Internet-enabled global economy of the early twenty-first century to the human and transhuman populated worlds of the outer solar system a half century later. The… read more

The Most Human Human: What Talking with Computers Teaches Us About What It Means to Be Alive

March 8, 2011

The Most Human Human book cover

author |
Brian Christian
year published |
2011

Amazon | The Most Human Human is a provocative, exuberant, and profound exploration of the ways in which computers are reshaping our ideas of what it means to be human. Its starting point is the annual Turing Test, which pits artificial intelligence programs against people to determine if computers can “think.”

Named for computer pioneer Alan Turing, the Tur­ing Test convenes a panel of judges who… read more

Twelve Tomorrows

December 14, 2013

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author |
Brian W. Aldiss, David Brin, Greg Egan
year published |
2013

The Anthology: Science fiction inspired by today’s new technologies

Inspired by the real-life breakthroughs covered in the pages of MIT Technology Review, renowned writers Brian W. Aldiss, David Brin, and Greg Egan join the hottest emerging authors from around the world to envision the future of the Internet, biotechnology, computing, and more.

This collection features 12 all-new stories, an exclusive interview with science fiction legend Neal Stephenson, and… read more

The Wealth of Humans: Work, Power, and Status in the Twenty-first Century

October 4, 2016

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author |
Ryan Avent
year published |
2016

None of us has ever lived through a genuine industrial revolution. Until now.

Digital technology is transforming every corner of the economy, fundamentally altering the way things are done, who does them, and what they earn for their efforts. In The Wealth of Humans, Economist editor Ryan Avent brings up-to-the-minute research and reporting to bear on the major economic question of our time: can the modern world manage… read more

Lesterland: The Corruption of Congress and How To End It (TED Books)

April 3, 2013

Lesterland The Corruption of Congress and How to End It

author |
Lawrence Lessig
year published |
2013

The American political system has been foundationally weakened by a corrupt campaign funding system, creating a dangerously unstable and inequitable design that could destroy our republic — if we let it. In this provocative and important book, Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig takes on the deep flaws in our campaign finance system and lays out a plan for fixing it. Lessig describes a place called Lesterland, a fictional land… read more

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values

September 10, 2010

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author |
Sam Harris
year published |
2010

Amazon | Sam Harris’s first book, The End of Faith, ignited a worldwide debate about the validity of religion. In the aftermath, Harris discovered that most people—from religious fundamentalists to nonbelieving scientists—agree on one point: science has nothing to say on the subject of human values.

Indeed, our failure to address questions of meaning and morality through science has now become the most common justification for religious… read more

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