Recently Added by year publishedBy Author | A-Z

Wetware: A Computer in Every Living Cell

October 28, 2012

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author |
Dennis Bray
year published |
2011

How does a single-cell creature, such as an amoeba, lead such a sophisticated life? How does it hunt living prey, respond to lights, sounds, and smells, and display complex sequences of movements without the benefit of a nervous system? This book offers a startling and original answer.

In clear, jargon-free language, Dennis Bray taps the findings of the new discipline of systems biology to show that the internal… read more

Universe

March 25, 2013
author |
Martin Rees
year published |
2012

From the fiery mass of the Sun’s core to the black hole at the center of the Milky Way, Universe takes you on the ultimate guided tour of the cosmos. Full of stunning out-of-this world images reflecting recent advances in space imagery, you’ll go on a journey from our solar system all the way to the farthest limits of space.

With information on the nature of the universe,… read more

My Brief History

September 20, 2013

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author |
Stephen Hawking
year published |
2013

Stephen Hawking has dazzled readers worldwide with a string of bestsellers exploring the mysteries of the universe. Now, for the first time, perhaps the most brilliant cosmologist of our age turns his gaze inward for a revealing look at his own life and intellectual evolution.

My Brief History recounts Stephen Hawking’s improbable journey, from his postwar London boyhood to his years of international acclaim and celebrity. Lavishly illustrated with… read more

The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health, and Disease

January 13, 2014

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author |
Daniel Lieberman
year published |
2013

In this landmark book of popular science, Daniel E. Lieberman — chair of the department of human evolutionary biology at Harvard University and a leader in the field — gives us a lucid and engaging account of how the human body evolved over millions of years, even as it shows how the increasing disparity between the jumble of adaptations in our Stone Age bodies and advancements in the modern… read more

Struck by Genius: How a Brain Injury Made Me a Mathematical Marvel

April 18, 2014

9780755364589

author |
Jason Padgett, Maureen Ann Seaberg
year published |
2014

The remarkable story of an ordinary man who was transformed when a traumatic injury left him with an extraordinary gift

No one sees the world as Jason Padgett does. Water pours from the faucet in crystalline patterns, numbers call to mind distinct geometric shapes, and intricate fractal patterns emerge from the movement of tree branches, revealing the intrinsic mathematical designs hidden in the objects around us.

Yet… read more

The Patient as CEO: How Technology Empowers the Healthcare Consumer

December 21, 2015

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author |
Robin Farmanfarmaian
year published |
2015

We are on the cusp of a healthcare revolution.

From wearable sensors, to improved point-of-care diagnostics to artificial intelligence and robotics, there are a great and growing number of breakthroughs in biomedical technology which are set to fundamentally change the way that patients interact with their healthcare providers.

Author Robin Farmanfarmaian has seen this change first-hand. Misdiagnosed at age 16, she endured multiple surgeries and countless hospitalizations… read more

Connectome: How the Brain’s Wiring Makes Us Who We Are

December 5, 2011

Connectome-Seung-Sebastian-9780547508184

author |
Sebastian Seung
year published |
2012

Amazon | The bold and thrilling quest to finally understand the brain — and along with it our mental afflictions, from depression to autism — by a rising star in neuroscience.

Sebastian Seung, a dynamic young professor at MIT, is at the forefront of a revolution in neuroscience. He believes that our identity lies not in our genes, but in the connections between our brain cells… read more

Homo Evolutis

November 6, 2012

Homo Evolutis

author |
Juan Enriquez
year published |
2011

There have been at least 25 prototype humans. We are but one more model, and there is no evidence evolution has stopped. So unless you think Rush Limbaugh and Howard Stern are the be all and end all of creation, and it just does not get any better, then one has to ask what is next? Juan Enriquez and Steve Gullans, two of the world’s most eminent science authors,… read more

A Very Short Tour of the Mind: 21 Short Walks Around the Human Brain

August 14, 2013

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author |
Michael C. Corballis
year published |
2013

Why do we remember faces but not names? If your brain were cut in half would you suffer more than a splitting headache? How does your dog remember where it buried its bone but you can’t find your keys? And do we really only use ten percent of our brains? In A Very Short Tour of the Mind, Michael C. Corballis answers these questions and more.… read more

Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think

January 3, 2012

abundance

author |
Peter H. Diamandis, Steven Kotler
year published |
2012

Amazon | Providing abundance is humanity’s grandest challenge — this is a book about how we rise to meet it. We will soon be able to meet and exceed the basic needs of every man, woman and child on the planet. Abundance for all is within our grasp. This bold, contrarian view, backed up by exhaustive research, introduces our near-term future, where exponentially growing technologies and three other powerful forces… read more

What to Think About Machines That Think: Today’s Leading Thinkers on the Age of Machine Intelligence

October 9, 2015

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author |
John Brockman
year published |
2015

As the world becomes ever more dominated by technology, John Brockman’s latest addition to the acclaimed and bestselling “Edge Question Series” asks more than 175 leading scientists, philosophers, and artists: What do you think about machines that think?

The development of artificial intelligence has been a source of fascination and anxiety ever since Alan Turing formalized the concept in 1950. Today, Stephen Hawking believes that AI “could spell… read more

In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives

March 17, 2011

In The Plex book cover

author |
Steven Levy
year published |
2011

Amazon | Few companies in history have ever been as successful and as admired as Google, the company that has transformed the Internet and become an indispensable part of our lives. How has Google done it? Veteran technology reporter Steven Levy was granted unprecedented access to the company, and in this revelatory book he takes readers inside Google headquarters — the Googleplex — to show how Google works.

While they were… read more

Thunder Dog: The True Story of a Blind Man, His Guide Dog, and the Triumph of Trust at Ground Zero

January 20, 2012

ThunderDog-FINAL

author |
Michael Hingson
year published |
2011

Amazon |  A blind man and his guide dog show the power of trust and courage in the midst of devastating terror.

It was 12:30 a.m. on 9/11 and Roselle whimpered at Michael’s bedside. A thunderstorm was headed east, and she could sense the distant rumbles while her owners slept. As a trained guide dog, when she was “on the clock” nothing could faze her. But that morning,… read more

You Tomorrow [Kindle Edition]

December 24, 2012

You_Tomorrow

author |
Ian Pearson
year published |
2011

If you wonder what your life tomorrow will bring, this is the book for you. It discusses how your everyday life will change over the next few decades.

First it covers the various stages of life, from pre-birth genetic design of your offspring all the way through to death and potential immortality. Along the way it considers the possible future of humanity.

In part 2, it goes on… read more

Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work and Think

March 25, 2013

book_big_data

author |
Viktor Mayer-Schonberger, Kenneth Cukier
year published |
2013

A revelatory exploration of the hottest trend in technology and the dramatic impact it will have on the economy, science, and society at large.

Which paint color is most likely to tell you that a used car is in good shape? How can officials identify the most dangerous New York City manholes before they explode? And how did Google searches predict the spread of the H1N1 flu outbreak?… read more

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