Recently Added by year publishedBy Author | A-Z

Computing with Quantum Cats: From Colossus to Qubits

March 20, 2014

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author |
John Gribbin
year published |
2014

A mind-blowing glimpse into the near future, where quantum computing will have world-transforming effects.

The quantum computer is no longer the stuff of science fiction. Pioneering physicists are on the brink of unlocking a new quantum universe which provides a better representation of reality than our everyday experiences and common sense ever could.

The birth of quantum computers — which, like Schrödinger’s famous “dead and alive” cat,… read more

What Makes Olga Run?: The Mystery of the 90-Something Track Star and What She Can Teach Us About Living Longer, Happier Lives

August 18, 2015

what makes olga run

author |
Bruce Grierson
year published |
2014

A fascinating look at the way we age today and the extent to which we can shape the process

In What Makes Olga Run? Bruce Grierson explores what the wild success of a ninety-four-year-old track star can tell us about how our bodies and minds age. Olga Kotelko is not your average ninety-four-year-old. She not only looks and acts like a much younger woman, she holds over twenty-three world… read more

The Machine Question: Critical Perspectives on AI, Robots, and Ethics

September 5, 2012

machine-question-book

author |
David J. Gunkel
year published |
2012

One of the enduring concerns of moral philosophy is deciding who or what is deserving of ethical consideration. Much recent attention has been devoted to the “animal question”–consideration of the moral status of nonhuman animals.

In this book, David Gunkel takes up the “machine question”: whether and to what extent intelligent and autonomous machines of our own making can be considered to have legitimate moral responsibilities and any… read more

Almost Human: Making Robots Think

March 22, 2010

almost_human

author |
Lee Gutkind
year published |
2009

American Library Assoc. | Creative nonfiction guru and seasoned immersion journalist Gutkind observes that just as computers changed the world in the 1990s, robots will “transform technology” in the future. To find out who is behind the growing robotic surge, Gutkind spent six years observing life at Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Institute, a “hypertechnological pressure cooker,” where work is frenzied, frustrating, “inspiring, compelling,” and addictive.

Gutkind presents vivid… read more

Modeling Ships and Space Craft: The Science and Art of Mastering the Oceans and Sky

December 19, 2012

modeling-ships-and-space-craft

author |
Gina Hagler
year published |
2012

Since the dawn of civilization, man has gazed across the oceans and up to the stars with dreams of conquering both. What may surprise readers is that the principles behind how ships were designed in yesteryear are not so far from how today’s air and space craft are created. In a new book by Gina Hagler, Modeling Ships and Space Craft: The Science and Art of Mastering the Oceansread more

Technology’s Promise: Expert Knowledge on the Transformation of Business and Society

July 16, 2010

Technology's Promise: Expert Knowledge on the Transformation of Business and Society

author |
William E. Halal
year published |
2008

Amazon | With the onset of a knowledge economy, modern nations are hard at work using ever more sophisticated information systems to power a “technology revolution” that is transforming our lives. This book is based on the work of the TechCast Project, conducted over the past decade at the George Washington University. Pooling the knowledge of 100 high-tech CEOs, scientists, engineers, academics, consultants, futurists, and other experts from around… read more

Beyond AI: Creating the Conscience of the Machine

April 9, 2009

Beyond AI

author |
J. Storrs Hall

Artificial intelligence (AI) is now advancing at such a rapid clip that it has the potential to transform our world in ways both exciting and disturbing. Computers have already been designed that are capable of driving cars, playing soccer, and finding and organizing information on the Web in ways that no human could. With each new gain in processing power, will scientists soon be able to create supercomputers that… read more

Nanofuture: What’s Next For Nanotechnology

April 9, 2009

nanofuture whats next

author |
J. Storrs Hall
year published |
2005

Hall writes that nanotechnology “involves building machines whose parts are of molecular size, but more importantly, of atomic precision … more »….” He foresees nanotechnology progressing through five stages of development, stage one being our current ability to image objects at an atomic scale with a limited ability to manipulate them, and stage five being the ability of miniature robots to reproduce and learn from experience.

A fellow… read more

Speak

September 22, 2015

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author |
Louisa Hall
year published |
2015

A thoughtful, poignant novel that explores the creation of Artificial Intelligence—illuminating the very human need for communication, connection, and understanding.

In a narrative that spans geography and time, from the Atlantic Ocean in the seventeenth century, to a correctional institute in Texas in the near future, and told from the perspectives of five very different characters, Speak considers what it means to be human, and what it means… read more

Collider: The Search for the World’s Smallest Particles

April 6, 2011

Collider book cover

author |
Paul Halpern
year published |
2010

Amazon | An accessible look at the hottest topic in physics and the experiments that will transform our understanding of the universe

The biggest news in science today is the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest and most powerful particle-smasher, and the anticipation of finally discovering the Higgs boson particle. But what is the Higgs boson and why is it often referred to as the God Particle?… read more

H+/-: Transhumanism and Its Critics

May 5, 2011

H+/- Transhumanism and Its Critics book cover

author |
Gregory R. Hansell, William Grassie
year published |
2011

William Grassie | Can human nature be improved upon with the application on new sciences and technologies? Can we increase human life span, perhaps even curing death? Can we recreate ourselves and our children to be super healthy, super attractive, super athletic, super happy, and super smart? Who gets to decide these questions and how? Would these super humans still be humans or should we better call them… read more

Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom

June 23, 2011

Buddha's Brain book cover

author |
Rick Hanson, Richard Mendius
year published |
2009

Publisher’s Weekly | The brain physiology associated with spiritual states has been fertile ground for researchers and writers alike. Neuropsychologist and meditation teacher Hanson suggests that an understanding of the brain in conjunction with 2,500-year-old Buddhist teachings can help readers achieve more happiness. He explains how the brain evolved to keep humans safe from external threats; the resulting built-in negativity bias creates suffering in modern individuals. Citing… read more

Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence

October 30, 2013

Hardwiring Happiness

author |
Rick Hanson
year published |
2013

Why is it easier to ruminate over hurt feelings than it is to bask in the warmth of being appreciated?

Because your brain evolved to learn quickly from bad experiences but slowly from the good ones.

You can change this.

Hardwiring Happiness lays out a simple method that uses the hidden power of everyday experiences to build new neural structures full of happiness, love, confidence, and… read more

The Age of Em: Work, Love and Life when Robots Rule the Earth

February 18, 2016

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author |
Robin Hanson
year published |
2016

Robots may one day rule the world, but what is a robot-ruled Earth like?

Many think the first truly smart robots will be brain emulations or “ems.” Scan a human brain, then run a model with the same connections on a fast computer, and you have a robot brain, but recognizably human.

Train an em to do some job and copy it a million times: an army… read more

The Age of Em: Work, Love and Life when Robots Rule the Earth

June 30, 2016

the-age-of-em-cover

author |
Robin Hanson
year published |
2016

Robots may one day rule the world, but what is a robot-ruled Earth like?

Many think the first truly smart robots will be brain emulations or “ems.” Scan a human brain, then run a model with the same connections on a fast computer, and you have a robot brain, but recognizably human.

Train an em to do some job and copy it a million times: an army… read more

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