Recently Added by year publishedBy Author | A-Z

Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies

March 27, 2012

culturinglife

author |
Hannah Landecker
year published |
2007

Amazon | How did cells make the journey, one we take so much for granted, from their origin in living bodies to something that can be grown and manipulated on artificial media in the laboratory, a substantial biomass living outside a human body, plant, or animal? This is the question at the heart of Hannah Landecker’s book. She shows how cell culture changed the way we think about such central… read more

Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty

March 23, 2012

whynationsfail

author |
Daron Acemoglu, James Robinson
year published |
2012

Amazon | Brilliant and engagingly written, Why Nations Fail answers the question that has stumped the experts for centuries: Why are some nations rich and others poor, divided by wealth and poverty, health and sickness, food and famine?

Is it culture, the weather, geography? Perhaps ignorance of what the right policies are?

Simply, no. None of these factors is either definitive or destiny. Otherwise, how… read more

Artificial Culture: Identity, Technology, and Bodies

March 22, 2012

ArtificialCulture_Cover1

author |
Tama Leaver
year published |
2011

Amazon | Artificial Culture is an examination of the articulation, construction, and representation of “the artificial” in contemporary popular cultural texts, especially science fiction films and novels. The book argues that today we live in an artificial culture due to the deep and inextricable relationship between people, our bodies, and technology at large. While the artificial is often imagined as outside of the natural order and thus also beyond… read more

Digital Teaching Platforms: Customizing Classroom Learning for Each Student

March 22, 2012

digitalteachingplatforms1

author |
Chris Dede, John Richards
year published |
2012

The Digital Teaching Platform (DTP) brings the power of interactive technology to teaching and learning in classrooms.

In this authoritative book, top researchers in the field of learning science and educational technology examine the current state of design and research on DTPs, the principles for evaluating them, and their likely evolution as a dominant medium for educational improvement.

The authors examine DTPs in… read more

Triggers

March 21, 2012

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author |
Robert J. Sawyer
year published |
2012

Amazon | On the eve of a secret military operation, an assassin’s bullet strikes President Seth Jerrison. He is rushed to the hospital, where surgeons struggle to save his life.

At the same hospital, researcher Dr. Ranjip Singh is experimenting with a device that can erase traumatic memories.

Then a terrorist bomb detonates. In the operating room, the president suffers cardiac arrest. He has a near-death experience — but… read more

Avogadro Corp

March 19, 2012

avogadrocorpcr1

author |
William Hertling
year published |
2011

Avogadro Corp: The Singularity Is Closer Than It Appears is a techno-thriller about the accidental creation of an artificial intelligence.

David Ryan is the designer of ELOPe, an email language optimization program, that if successful, will make his career. But when the project is suddenly in danger of being canceled, David embeds a hidden directive in the software accidentally creating a runaway artificial intelligence.

David and… read more

Nanotechnology Commercialization for Managers and Scientists

March 19, 2012

nanotechcomm

author |
Wim Helwegen, Luca Escoffier
year published |
2012

The nanotechnology industry is a fast growing industry with many unique characteristics. When bringing the results of nanotechnology research to the market, companies and universities run into unforeseen problems related to intellectual property rights and other legal and regulatory issues.

An effective commercialization of the results of research requires basic knowledge of the relevant issues and a well-defined strategy, while the absence of such knowledge and strategy can be… read more

The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind, and Brain, from Vienna 1900 to the Present

March 19, 2012

theageofinsight

author |
Eric R. Kandel
year published |
2012

A brilliant book by Nobel Prize winner Eric R. Kandel, The Age of Insight takes us to Vienna 1900, where leaders in science, medicine, and art began a revolution that changed forever how we think about the human mind — our conscious and unconscious thoughts and emotions—and how mind and brain relate to art.

At the turn of the century, Vienna was the cultural capital of Europe. Artists and… read more

Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier

March 7, 2012

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author |
Neil deGrasse Tyson
year published |
2012

A thought-provoking and humorous collection on NASA and the future of space travel.

Neil deGrasse Tyson is a rare breed of astrophysicist, one who can speak as easily and brilliantly with popular audiences as with professional scientists. Now that NASA has put human space flight effectively on hold — with a five- or possibly ten-year delay until the next launch of astronauts from U.S. soil — Tyson’s views… read more

Theo Gray’s Mad Science: Experiments You Can do At Home – But Probably Shouldn’t

March 1, 2012

MadScience

author |
Theodore Gray
year published |
2011

Amazon | In Mad Science, Theodore Gray launches a toy rocket using the energy released from an Oreo cookie, ignites a phosphorus sun by suspending half a gram of white phosphorus in a globe filled with pure oxygen and creates a homemade hot tub by adding 500 pounds of quicklime to water. These are just a few of the 54 experiments included in this astonishing book that demonstrates essential scientific principles… read more

The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care

February 24, 2012

creativedestructionofmedicine

author |
Eric Topol, M.D.
year published |
2012

What if your cell phone could detect cancer cells circulating in your blood or warn you of an imminent heart attack? Mobile wireless digital devices, including smartphones and tablets with seemingly limitless functionality, have brought about radical changes in our lives, providing hyper-connectivity to social networks and cloud computing. But the digital world has hardly pierced the medical cocoon.

Until now. Beyond reading email and surfing… read more

Living Architecture: How Synthetic Biology Can Remake Our Cities and Reshape Our Lives

February 24, 2012

livingarchitecture

author |
Rachel Armstrong

What will the city of the future look like? More like an ever-changing and vibrant garden than a static set of buildings and blocks. In ‘Living Architecture,’ British scientist and architect Rachel Armstrong re-imagines the world’s extensive urban areas and argues that in order to achieve sustainable development of the built environment — and help countries like Japan recover from natural disasters — we need to start… read more

Turing’s Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe

February 24, 2012

turingscathedral

author |
George Dyson
year published |
2012

“It is possible to invent a single machine which can be used to compute any computable sequence,” twenty-four-year-old Alan Turing announced in 1936. In Turing’s Cathedral, George Dyson focuses on a small group of men and women, led by John von Neumann at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, who built one of the first computers to realize Alan Turing’s vision of a Universal Machine.… read more

A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing

February 24, 2012

auniversefromnothing

author |
Lawrence M. Krauss
year published |
2012

Lawrence Krauss’s provocative answers to these and other timeless questions in a wildly popular lecture now on YouTube have attracted almost a million viewers. The last of these questions in particular has been at the center of religious and philosophical debates about the existence of God, and it’s the supposed counterargument to anyone who questions the need for God. As Krauss argues, scientists have, however, historically focused… read more

On Being Certain: Believing You Are Right Even When You’re Not

February 24, 2012

onbeingcertain

author |
Robert Burton
year published |
2009

You recognize when you know something for certain, right? You “know” the sky is blue, or that the traffic light had turned green, or where you were on the morning of September 11, 2001 — you know these things, well, because you just do.

In On Being Certain, neurologist Robert Burton shows that feeling certain — feeling that we know something — is a mental sensation, rather than evidence of… read more

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