Recently Added by year publishedBy Author | A-Z

The Scientific American Brave New Brain

January 6, 2011

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author |
Judith Horstman, Scientific American
year published |
2010

Amazon | This fascinating and highly accessible book presents fantastic but totally feasible projections of what your brain may be capable of in the near future. It shows how scientific breakthroughs and amazing research are turning science fiction into science fact. In this brave new book, you’ll explore:

        • How partnerships between biological sciences and technology are

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The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood

March 8, 2011

The Information book cover

author |
James Gleick
year published |
2011

Amazon | James Gleick, the author of the best sellers Chaos and Genius, now brings us a work just as astonishing and masterly: a revelatory chronicle and meditation that shows how information has become the modern era’s defining quality — the blood, the fuel, the vital principle of our world.

The story of information begins in a time profoundly unlike our own, when every thought and utterance vanishes as… read more

Futurecast: How Superpowers, Populations, and Globalization Will Change the Way You Live and Work

May 4, 2011

Futurecast book cover

author |
Robert J. Shapiro
year published |
2008

Amazon | What will life be like in America, Europe, Japan or China in the year 2020?

As everyone’s lives across the world are become increasingly interconnected by globalization and new technologies quicken the pace of everything, the answer to that question depends on the fate and paths of the world’s major nations. In Futurecast, Robert Shapiro, former U.S. Under Secretary of Commerce and Chairman/Co-founder of Sonecon,… read more

Dark Ages II: When the Digital Data Die

June 17, 2011

Dark Ages 2 book cover

author |
Bryan Bergeron
year published |
2001

The Book Depository | Today, most of the world’s data is stored in media and formats that are frighteningly ephemeral: Web sites and email stores that are here today and gone tomorrow; magnetic media that isn’t proven to last; document and e-book formats that quickly become obsolete. In Dark Ages II, Bryan Bergeron shows why our data is at far greater risk than we’ve ever imagined — and… read more

The Tomorrow Project: Bestselling Authors Describe Daily Life in the Future

August 24, 2011

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author |
Douglas Rushkoff, Ray Hammond, Scarlett Thomas
year published |
2011

Intel | “The Tomorrow-Project” is a unique literary project which shows the important effects that contemporary research will have on our future and the relevance that this research has for each of us. Research currently being conducted by Intel in the fields of photonics, robotics, telematics, dynamic physical rendering and intelligent sensors served as the basis to inspire four bestselling authors. The results are four short stories… read more

Imagine: How Creativity Works

January 4, 2012

imagine

author |
Jonah Lehrer
year published |
2012

Amazon | Did you know that the most creative companies have centralized bathrooms? That brainstorming meetings are a terrible idea? That the color blue can help you double your creative output?

From the best-selling author of How We Decide comes a sparkling and revelatory look at the new science of creativity. Shattering the myth of muses, higher powers, even creative “types,” Jonah Lehrer demonstrates that creativity is not… read more

Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist

April 30, 2012

consciousness

author |
Christof Koch
year published |
2012

Amazon | What links conscious experience of pain, joy, color, and smell to bioelectrical activity in the brain? How can anything physical give rise to nonphysical, subjective, conscious states? Christof Koch has devoted much of his career to bridging the seemingly unbridgeable gap between the physics of the brain and phenomenal experience. This engaging book — part scientific overview, part memoir, part futurist speculation — describes Koch’s search for an empirical explanation… read more

Lynn Margulis: The Life and Legacy of a Scientific Rebel

September 5, 2012
author |
Dorion Sagan
year published |
2012

Tireless, controversial, and hugely inspirational to those who knew her or encountered her work, Lynn Margulis was a scientist whose intellectual energy and interests knew no bounds. Best known for her work on the origins of eukaryotic cells, the Gaia hypothesis, and symbiogenesis as a driving force in evolution, her work has forever changed the way we understand life on Earth.

When Margulis passed away in… read more

Stones of Significance

October 26, 2012

stonessignificancecover

author |
David Brin
year published |
2011

Heard of the “singularity”? A time of transition that some perceive just ahead of us, when our skill and knowledge and immense computing power transform us into… well… godlike beings? An immense topic! But from a writer’s perspective, it presents a problem. One can write stories leading up to the singularity, about all the problems. (Little things like rebellious AI.) But how do you write a tale set AFTER… read more

Engineering the Next Revolution in Neuroscience: The New Science of Experiment Planning

August 13, 2013

Engineering the next rev in neuro

author |
Alcino J. Silva, Anthony Landreth, John Bickle
year published |
2013

Science is growing at a pace that exceeds our comprehension. This is no less true of neuroscience than any other discipline. Ambiguity about what is known and what has been disproven confounds researchers and hampers research planning. There are simply too many research articles and too few hours in the day for anyone to read all that is relevant, let alone distinguish the reliable results from the sketchy ones.… read more

The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future (Or, Don’t Trust Anyone Under 30)

February 21, 2014

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author |
Mark Bauerlein
year published |
2008

For decades, concern has been brewing about the dumbed-down popular culture of young people and the impact it has on their futures.

The dawn of the digital age once aroused our hopes: the Internet, e-mail, blogs, and interactive and ultra-realistic video games promised to yield a generation of sharper, more aware, and intellectually sophisticated children. The terms “information superhighway” and “knowledge economy” entered the lexicon, and we assumed… read more

Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen

July 21, 2014

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author |
Philip Ball
year published |
2014

If you could be invisible, what would you do? The chances are that it would have something to do with power, wealth or sex. Perhaps all three.

But there’s no need to feel guilty. Impulses like these have always been at the heart of our fascination with invisibility: it points to realms beyond our senses, serves as a receptacle for fears and dreams, and hints at worlds where… read more

Carry On: Sound Advice from Schneier on Security

January 2, 2015

Carry On

author |
Bruce Schneier
year published |
2014

Up-to-the-minute observations from a world-famous security expert

Bruce Schneier is known worldwide as the foremost authority and commentator on every security issue from cyber-terrorism to airport surveillance. This groundbreaking book features more than 160 commentaries on recent events including the Boston Marathon bombing, the NSA’s ubiquitous surveillance programs, Chinese cyber-attacks, the privacy of cloud computing, and how to hack the Papal election. Timely as an Internet news report and… read more

Coming of Age in Second Life: An Anthropologist Explores the Virtually Human

September 14, 2015

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author |
Tom Boellstorff
year published |
2008

Millions of people around the world today spend portions of their lives in online virtual worlds. Second Life is one of the largest of these virtual worlds. The residents of Second Life create communities, buy property and build homes, go to concerts, meet in bars, attend weddings and religious services, buy and sell virtual goods and services, find friendship, fall in love–the possibilities are endless, and all encountered through… read more

A Brief History of Time

April 9, 2009
author |
Stephen William Hawking
year published |
1998

Published in 1988, A Brief History of Time, was a landmark volume in science writing and in world-wide acclaim and popularity, with more than 9 million copies in print globally. The original edition was on the cutting edge of what was then known about the origins and nature of the universe. But the ensuing years have seen extraordinary advances in the technology of observing both the micro- and the macrocosmic… read more

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