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Space Wars: The First Six Hours of World War III

April 17, 2007 by William B. Scott, Amara D. Angelica

Space Wars by Willliam Scott, Michael Coumatos, and William Birnes, Forge Books (April 17, 2007) describes how the first hours of World War III might play out in the year 2010. While fiction, it’s based on real-world military scenarios and technologies, dramatically highlighting the West’s vulnerability to destruction of its space-based commercial and military communications infrastructure.… read more

How the Mind Works

February 21, 2001 by Steven Pinker

In this William James Book Prize Lecture, presented to the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association, August 1999, Steven Pinker, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, attempts to describe how the mind works, using three key ideas: computation, evolution, and specialization.… read more

Kurzweil vs. Dertouzos

March 7, 2001 by Ray Kurzweil, Michael L. Dertouzos

In this Technology Review article, Raymond Kurzweil and Michael Dertouzos debate Bill Joy’s Wired article urging “relinquishment” of research in certain risky areas of nanotechnology, genetics, and robotics.… read more

The Unabomber’s Manifesto

May 14, 2001 by Ted Kaczynski

This manifesto, presented here in its entirety, ranges from articulate, intelligent psychosocial analysis and criticism to angry delusion. We aren’t endorsing Ted Kaczynski’s views or actions, but we do believe that this text should be read as part of the debate between those who wish to relinquish further technological development and those who are optimistic about the positive impacts of technology on humanity and oppose impediments to progress.… read more

Stop everything…IT’S TECHNO-HORROR!

July 25, 2001 by George Gilder, Richard Vigilante

From Silicon Valley via Aspen, Bill Joy wants to call the police. On science. On technology. On the industry that made him rich. The Left is OverJoyed.… read more

Learning in the Age of Knowledge

August 6, 2001 by Ray Kurzweil

An overview of how education is changing with technology, written for “The Futurecast,” a monthly column in the Library Journal.… read more

How Ray Kurzweil Keeps Changing the World

November 7, 2001 by John Williams

The inventor whose amazing devices have transformed the lives of the disabled pursues a new dream: Making paraplegics walk again.… read more

What’s the neurobiology of doing good and being good?

January 21, 2002 by Robert Sapolsky

The 5th Annual Edge Question reflects the spirit of the Edge motto: “To arrive at the edge of the world’s knowledge, seek out the most complex and sophisticated minds, put them in a room together, and have them ask each other the questions they are asking themselves.” Roger Sapolsky asks: what’s the neurobiology of doing and being good?… read more

Response to Mitchell Kapor’s “Why I Think I Will Win”

April 9, 2002 by Ray Kurzweil

Ray Kurzweil responds to Mitch Kapor’s arguments against the possibility that an AI that will pass a Turing Test in 2029 in this final counterpoint on the bet: an AI will pass a Turing Test by 2029.… read more

National Gallery for America’s Young Inventors: Brochure Statement

September 22, 2002

On Sept. 21, 2002, Ray Kurzweil presented an award to Ezra Rapoport at the National Gallery for America’s Young Inventors ceremony. Rapoport, an 18-year-old inventor and part-time employee of KurzweilAI.net, was recognized for his invention of a speech-compression method that transmits speech clearly and reliably over phone lines using only 3 Kbps, allowing for 20 conversations over a single phone line.… read more

Review of Nanocosm

June 6, 2003 by Chris Phoenix

The new book Nanocosm reports on exciting advances in nanotech but suffers from numerous technical inaccuracies and distortions of the work of nanotech pioneers.… read more

Two Stars For Peace: The Case for Using U.S. Statehood to Achieve Lasting Peace in the Middle East

January 25, 2005 by Martine Rothblatt

World order is essential to reducing the time to the Singularity, says author Martine Rothblatt, citing Ray Kurzweil’s observation that increased order (and lowered chaos) reduces the interval between salient events in time.
In a new book, she suggests an imaginative solution to one major threat to world order: the explosive Palestine/Israeli conflict.… read more

Molecular Manufacturing and 21st Century Policing

March 29, 2006 by Thomas J. Cowper

Will nanofactories foster global anarchy? Will nations devolve into a technologically-driven arms race, the winner dominating or destroying the planet with powerful molecular-manufacturing-enabled weapons? Or will the world’s Big Brothers grow larger and more tyrannical, using advanced nanotechnology to “protect” their law abiding masses through increasing surveillance, control and internal subjugation? A law-enforcement executive asks the tough questions.… read more

Why Cryosuspension Makes Sense

April 3, 2001 by Terry Grossman

We’re all genetically programmed to die, but advances in nanomedicine are expected to allow for “radical life extension” by 2050. Meanwhile, there’s cryostasis–freezing the body immediately after death with a view toward resuscitation in the future.… read more

An Inventive Author

May 25, 2001 by Harriet Barovic

A look at Raymond Kurzweil’s roots and beginnings in becoming an innovator.… read more

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