Martine Rothblatt

July 11, 2009

Martine Rothblatt is responsible for launching several satellite communications companies, including the first nationwide vehicle location system (Geostar, 1983), the first private international spacecom project (PanAmSat, 1984), the first global satellite radio network (WorldSpace, 1990), and the first non-geostationary satellite-to-car broadcasting system (Sirius, 1990). As an attorney-entrepreneur she was also responsible for leading the efforts to obtain worldwide approval, via new international treaties, of satellite orbit/spectrum allocations for space-based navigation services (1987) and for direct-to-person satellite radio transmissions (1992). In the 1990s Dr. Rothblatt entered the life sciences field by leading the International Bar Association’s project to develop a draft Human Genome Treaty for the United Nations (submitted in 1999), and by founding a biotechnology company, United Therapeutics (1996). Dr. Rothblatt is the author of books on satellite communications technology (Radiodetermination Satellite Services and Standards, Artech, 1987), gender freedom (Apartheid of Sex, Crown, 1995), genomics (Unzipped Genes, Temple University Press, 1997) and xenotransplantation (Your Life or Mine, Ashgate House, 2003). She is also cyberscripted and produced one of the first cybermuseums, the World Against Racism Museum, www.endracism.org.

See essays by this author:
Can we develop and test machine minds and uploads ethically?
Biocyberethics: should we stop a company from unplugging an intelligent computer?
On genes, memes, bemes, and conscious things
Two Stars For Peace: The Case for Using U.S. Statehood to Achieve Lasting Peace in the Middle East
See blog posts by this author:
We Are the World: inviting everyone onboard the 100YSS is practical and will help to ensure its success
See selected books by this author:
From Transgender to Transhuman: A Manifesto On the Freedom Of Form