The New York Times • Book Review | How we’ll end up merging with our technology

Ray Kurzweil reviews 2 popular books
March 30, 2017


Dear readers,

Ray Kurzweil wrote a book review for The New York Times • Book Review section. His review is titled “How we we’ll end up merging with our technology.” He reviews 2 new books on computing and the future of society.

Please click to read the full review here exploring these two popular books in science & tech non-fiction. Enjoy the details and excerpts from Ray Kurzweil’s review below.

editors


no. 1  | The New York Times • Book Review by Ray Kurzweil

book: Heart of the Machine: Our future in a world of artificial emotional intelligence
book author: by Richard Yonck

web link:
full book review by Ray Kurzweil
story title: How we’ll end up merging with our technology
date: March 14, 2017

excerpt: Richard Yonck’s book Heart of the Machine provides an important insight in his title — artificial intelligence is emotional intelligence. People often refer to emotion as a sideshow to human intelligence, that the essence of our thinking is the ability to think logically. If that were true, then machines are already vastly superior to us. The superiority of human thinking is our ability to express a loving sentiment, to create and appreciate music, to get the joke — all examples of emotional intelligence.

He describes today’s emerging technologies for understanding our emotions using images of facial expressions, intonation patterns, respiration, galvanic skin response, and other signals. He shows how this will soon be used in applications from interactive augmented reality experiences to military engagements.

Richard Yonck concludes we’ll merge with our technology. He points out that humans “have been doing this for a long time already.” And to merge with future, super-intelligent AI will require creating tech that can master human emotion.

Ray Kurzweil


no. 2 The New York Times • Book Review by Ray Kurzweil

book: Thinking Machines: the quest for artificial intelligence, and where it’s taking us next
book author: by Luke Dormehl

web link:
full book review by Ray Kurzweil
story title: How we’ll end up merging with our technology
date: March 14, 2017

excerpt: I recommend the book Thinking Machines by Luke Dormehl to anyone with a lay scientific background who wants to understand what I would argue is the most important revolution in the world today, where it came from, how it works, and what is on the horizon.

Luke Dormehl examines the pending social and economic impact of AI, for example on employment. He recounts the positive history of automation. Many economists are saying the future will be different due to unprecedented acceleration of progress.

Although expressing some cautions, Luke Dormehl shares my optimism that we will be able to deploy the role of AI as brain extenders to keep ahead of this economic curve.

Luke Dormehl is a gifted story-teller. He interweaves personal stories in the broad history of artificial intelligence to understand its progress.

Ray Kurzweil


1. about | book by Richard Yonck
Heart of the Machine: Our future in a world of artificial emotional intelligence

Imagine a robotic stuffed animal that can read and respond to a child’s emotional state, a commercial that can recognize and change based on a customer’s facial expression, or a company that can actually create feelings as though a person were experiencing them naturally. The book Heart of the Machine explores the next giant step between humans and tech — the ability of computers to recognize, respond to, and replicate emotions.

Computers have long been integral to our lives, advances continue at an exponential rate. Many people think artificial that’s equal to humans will happen in the  future, and maybe machines with consciousness will follow. Futurist Richard Yonck argues that emotion is how we will soon work with computers.

Richard Yonck warns that computers with emotion recognition could lead to surveillance.  In movies like Her and Ex Machina, our society has anxiety about what could happen if machines can feel. Heart of the Machine explores new ways humans and computers could interact.

publisher

on the web
Richard Yonck | main


2. about | book by Luke Dormehl
Thinking MachinesThe quest for artificial intelligence, and where it’s taking us next

A fascinating look at the computer filed of artificial intelligence, from its humble Cold War beginnings to the dazzling future that is just around the corner.

When most of us think about artificial intelligence, we think of cyborgs, robots, and science fiction thrillers where machines take over the world. But the truth is artificial intelligence is already among us. It exists in our smart-phones, fitness trackers, and refrigerators that tell us when the milk will expire.

In some ways, the future people dreamed of at the World’s Fair in the 1960s is already here. We’re teaching our machines how to think like humans, and they’re learning at an incredible rate. In the book Thinking Machines, tech journalist Luke Dormehl takes us through the history of artificial intelligence — and how it makes up the foundations of the machines that think for us today.

He speculates on the incredible, and possibly terrifying, future that’s much closer than we imagine. This book invites us to marvel at what now seems common — and dream about a future with  intelligent machines.

publisher

on the web
Luke Dormehl | main



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