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Zillions of Universes? Or Did Ours Get Lucky?

October 28, 2003

Cosmologists debated the controversial anthropic principle* at a recent conference, “The Future of Cosmology,” at Case Western Reserve University.

* An attempt to explain why the fundamental constants of physics and chemistry are fine-tuned to allow the universe and life at we know it to exist.

Sound-detecting hair cells grown in lab

October 28, 2003

Sound-detecting hair cells of the inner ear can be grown in the lab from embryonic stem cells, scientists have shown, creating a possible alternative to cochlear implants for treating deafness.

Cyber women test what’s real

October 27, 2003
News tip: Carl Vinci

Software cyberbabes, created by powerful computers, sophisticated modelling packages and active imaginations are getting extremely human-like.

The Galactic Civilizations: Part V

October 27, 2003

“There’s no logical reason to believe that machine intelligence won’t, in fact, inherit the Earth, and perhaps inherit the Universe,” said cosmologist David Grinspoon, referring to Ray Kurzweil’s idea of the coming merger of human and machine.

“And you can certainly imagine, even if it doesn’t happen here, that on some planet intelligent machines have been created which are effectively immortal. In fact, I think that it’s hard to… read more

Silicon May Have Been The Key To Start Of Life On Earth

October 27, 2003

A scientist at the University of Sheffield has discovered that silicon may have been the key to the establishment of life on earth.

In a paper, due to be published in the International Journal of Astrobiology, Dr Wainwright outlines his team’s discovery that silicon stimulates bacterial growth when food is in short supply, even in the absence of oxygen.

Scientists discover largest structure in universe

October 27, 2003

Scientists have discovered the largest structure yet found in the universe, a “Great Wall” of galaxies 1.37 billion light-years long, according to an article in Science, Oct. 24, 2003.

This cosmic ribbon dwarfs anything seen before by more than 600 million light-years. The wall’s vastness pushes the limits of existing cosmological theories.

Orgasmatron Puts Tech in Sex

October 27, 2003

A Texas company claims to have invented a kind of Orgasmatron for women — an electrical stimulation device that takes women to a pre-orgasmic state.

Methuselah Worm Remains Energetic for Life

October 27, 2003

Researchers report in the current issue of the journal Science that variants of the simple worm C. elegans can live 124 days–the equivalent of a human reaching his 500th birthday.

The researchers perturbed genes in C. elegans that affect the activity of insulin and removed gonad tissue, which affects endocrine hormone levels. Worms treated this way lived six times longer than normal worms and remained active for most of… read more

There’s a Sucker Born in Every Medial Prefrontal Cortex

October 27, 2003

A growing breed of “neuromarketer”
researchers are applying the methods of the neurology lab to the questions of the advertising world.

Is grid computing finally a reality?

October 27, 2003

As Oracle prepares to launch “grid-enabled” versions of its database and application server, are we any closer to a computer grid, which promises the self-diagnostic and self-healing capabilities that computer companies and their customers have sought for so many years?

Oracle’s new products do exhibit some features of self-healing and self-tuning, but a homogeneous grid is still a long way off.

Personal nanofactory design raises prepardness concerns

October 27, 2003

Center for Responsible Nanotechnology (CRN) has published a landmark design study for a personal-size nanofactory that could rapidly manufacture a wide array of advanced products, including more nanofactories, while using minimal resources.

Design of a Primitive Nanofactory” by CRN Director of Research Chris Phoenix appeared in the peer-reviewed Journal of Evolution and Technology. The 84-page technical paper is the most comprehensive examination of nanofactory architecture… read more

Patients given artificial blood

October 27, 2003

Doctors have for the first time successfully used artificial blood to treat patients.

The product is a powder that can be stored for years, say scientists at Stockholm’s Karolinska Hospital. It can transport oxygen through the body better than real blood and there is no need to test a patient’s blood type before administering a transfusion.

News tip: Walter Purvis

Terahertz rays allow imaging at nanoscale

October 24, 2003

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute researchers have shown that terahertz rays can be used in conjunction with scanning near-field microscopy, according to a paper published in Applied Physics Letter.

The technique circumvents the usual “diffraction limit” on imaging methods, which restricts the resolution to the same order of magnitude as the wavelength of the radiation used.

By demonstrating a resolution of 150 nm using THz radiation of 150 microns, the… read more

Amazon.com launches full-text search for books

October 24, 2003

Amazon.com launched a new service today that lets you search the full text inside the book for more than 120,000 books (33 million pages).

After you search as usual for books containing a word or phrase (such as “biological intelligence”), you can click on the “See more references to ‘biological intelligence’ in this book” link (for participating books) to see excerpts from all the pages where “biological… read more

Intel explores nanotech tools for early disease detection

October 24, 2003

Intel is working with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center to see if laser technology used to detect microscopic chip imperfections can also detect subtle traces of disease.

They hope to identify proteins in human blood serum that foretell the susceptibility, presence or prognosis of diseases such as cancer.

The laser stimulates molecules within a substance to give off a spectrum of light that can be detected by… read more

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