science + technology news

‘Stress’ protein could halt aging process, say scientists

May 25, 2010

Excessive amounts of HSP10 (Heat Shock Protein) inside mitochondria (energy generators in cells) can halt the body’s aging process by preserving muscle strength, University of Liverpool and the University of California have found.

Stress turns ordinary cells pluripotent [RESEARCHER MISCONDUCT FOUND]

Implications for regenerative medicine, aging, cancer
January 30, 2014

riken_mouse_embryo

UPDATE: April 4, 2014 — A committee organized by the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology has concluded that RIKEN’s Haruko Obokata, Ph.D., the lead researcher of this study, is guilty of scientific misconduct, according to a news article in Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News

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Breakthrough findings by Haruko Obokata and colleagues at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology (CDB) look to upset the fundamental… read more

Stress-generated cortisol found to cause premature aging of immune system

July 16, 2008
Immune cells (stained blue) end in protective caps called telomeres (stained yellow) that are shorter in the elderly -- and in persons suffering chronic stress. A new UCLA study suggests cortisol is the culprit behind premature aging of the immune system in stressed-out people. (UCLA/Effros lab)

A new UCLA study suggests cortisol is the culprit behind premature aging of the immune system in stressed-out people.

UCLA scientists found that the stress hormone cortisol suppresses immune cells’ ability to activate their telomerase, an enzyme within the cell that keeps immune cells young by preserving their telomere length and ability to continue dividing. This may explain why the cells of persons under chronic stress have… read more

Stressed Mice Quicker To Get Skin Cancer

December 15, 2004

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have found that stress can speed up the onset of skin cancer in mice.

Their study shows that mice exposed to stressful conditions and cancer-causing UV light developed skin cancers in less than half the time it took for non-stressed mice to grow tumors.

The investigators say that if what they are seeing in mice has relevance in man, stress-reducing programs like… read more

Stressed-DNA repair protein identified

June 17, 2011

Vera Gorbunova and Andrei Seluanov of the University of Rochester have found that human cells undergoing oxidative stress caused by environmental chemicals or routine cellular processes produce a protein (SIRT6) that stimulates cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks, thought to be associated with premature aging and cancer.

The team first measured levels of SIRT6 in stressed cells, then treated a second… read more

Stretchable Displays

May 11, 2009

Researchers at the University of Tokyo have developed a stretchable display by connecting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic transistors with a new rubbery conductor.

The display can be folded in half or crumpled up without incurring any damage, and can also cover complex three-dimensional objects, unlike other stretchable displays.

Stretchable electronics that can quadruple in length

Ideal for prosthetics or robot skin
March 3, 2016

Intrinsically stretchable biphasic gold–gallium thin films. Picture of a biphasic gold–gallium film patterned by photolithography with critical dimension of 100 μm on a 40 μm thick poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer membrane. Scale bar: 5 mm; Inset scale bar: 500 μm. (credit: Arthur Hirsch et al./Advanced Materials)

EPFL researchers have developed films with conductive tracks just several hundreds of nanometers thick that can be bent and stretched up to four times their original length. They could be used in artificial skin, connected clothing, and on-body sensors.

Instead of bring printed on a board, the tracks are almost as flexible as rubber and can be stretched up to four times their original length and in… read more

Stretchable silicon could be next wave in electronics

December 16, 2005

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers have developed a fully stretchable form of single-crystal silicon with micron-sized, wave-like geometries that can be used to build high-performance electronic devices on rubber substrates.

Functional, stretchable and bendable electronics could be used in applications such as sensors and drive electronics for integration into artificial muscles or biological tissues, structural monitors wrapped around aircraft wings, and conformable skins for integrated robotic sensors, said… read more

Stretchable Silicon Could Make Sports Apparel Smarter

December 13, 2010

Flexible silicon transistor arrays on cloth (John Rogers)

Stretchable silicon electronics that offer the computing power of rigid chips could make their way into Reebok‘s athletic apparel in the coming years to monitor athletes’ health and performance during training and rehabilitation.

The electronics could be totally incorporated into the inside of a shirt, or into a decal placed directly on the skin, without the need for a casing. They could conform to the body, and their… read more

Stretchable Silicon May Inspire a New Wave of Electronics

June 14, 2007

Scientists have created a form of nanoscale silicon that is stretchable. The new material may help pave the way for a class of stretchable electronic devices, such as “smart” surgical gloves and personal health monitors, that are not possible to create using current technology and materials.

Stretchable Silicon Sensors Could Speed Up Heart Surgery

May 5, 2011

http://www.technologyreview.com/computing/35063/

Stretchable silicon, a new surgical technology, uses hundreds of thousands of stretchable sensors embedded on the surface of a balloon catheter to map electrical problems in the heart, such as atrial fibrillation.

The technology was recently developed at MC10 Inc. and successfully tested on animals by John Rogers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne and colleagues.

Conventional balloon catheters… read more

Stretchable, bendable optical interconnections for body sensors and robotic skin

February 20, 2014

bent_optical_circuit

Belgian researchers say they have created the first optical circuit that uses interconnections that are stretchable as well as bendable.The technology has applications like wearable body sensors and robotic skin.

These new interconnections, made of a rubbery transparent material called PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), guide light along their path even when stretched up to 30% and when bent around an object the diameter of a human finger.

By… read more

Stretchable, flexible ‘meta-skin’ cloaks objects from radar at a range of frequencies

"Invisibility cloak" may be further developed to operate in visible or infrared light ranges
March 7, 2016

Wraparound meta-skin (credit: Siming Yang et al./Scientific Reports)

Iowa State University engineers have developed a new flexible, stretchable, and  tunable “meta-skin” (metamaterial) “invisibility cloak” that uses rows of small liquid-metal devices to cloak an object from radar over a wide range of frequencies — and possibly at visible or infrared light ranges in the future.

The  skin has rows of split ring resonators embedded inside layers of silicone sheets. The… read more

Stretched neutrinos could span the universe

June 10, 2009

The most massive quantum-mechanical superpositions of three different mass-energy states of “relic” neutrinos produced by the big bang may have slowed down, stretching them across the universe as it expanded, according to calculations by George Fuller and Chad Kishimoto of the University of California, San Diego.

Stretching sensors may enable novel wearable electronics

May 15, 2011

sensor

A new stretching sensor that measures both pressure and stretch has been developed by researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC in Würzburg.

Made of  an elastomer material coated on both sides with flexible electrodes, the sensor is able to stretch to twice its area before tearing.

“The sensors could be used to design [a] smart safety system [for airbags] that can sense… read more

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