science + technology news

3D audio system developed by MP3 pioneer

July 28, 2004

A sound system that creates immersive, three-dimensional audio for everyone in a room has been developed by one of the creators of the MP3 audio format.

It uses a principle known as “wave field synthesis” to create complex audio illusions for everyone within a defined space. Computers are used to predict the way multiple sound waves will interact with each other within a space. Then, a multitude of small… read more

3D bio-printers to print skin and body parts

February 25, 2011

An ear made of silicone using a 3D bio-printer (Cornell University)

Scientists are developing 3D “bioprinters” that will be able to print out skin, cartilage, bone, and other body parts.

Professor James Yoo, from the Institute of Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest University is developing a system that will allow them to print skin directly onto burn wounds. The bioprinter has a built-in laser scanner that scans the wound and determines its depth and area. The scan is converted into… read more

3D ‘body-on-a-chip’ project aims to accelerate drug testing, reduce costs

Initial system uses micro-sized 3D liver, heart, and lung "organoids"
October 9, 2017

Scientists created miniature models of hearts, lungs, and livers and combined them into an integrated "body-on-a-chip" system, fed with nutrient-rich fluid to mimic blood (credit: Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center)

A team of scientists at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and nine other institutions has engineered miniature 3D human hearts, lungs, and livers to achieve more realistic testing of how the human body responds to new drugs.

The “body-on-a-chip” project, funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, aims to help reduce the estimated $2 billion cost and 90 percent failure rate that pharmaceutical companies face… read more

3D chip stacking to take Moore’s Law past 2020

March 12, 2010

3D Microchips

By combining 3D-stack-architecture of multiple cores with hair-thin, liquid-cooled microchannels, IBM and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich hope to extend Moore’s law for another decade or more.

3D chip stacks with interlayer cooling overcome the bandwidth bottleneck between core and cache memory and allow for systems with a much higher efficiency, so supercomputers won’t consume too much energy to be affordable.

To solve the… read more

3D copying makes Michelangelos of the masses

June 17, 2012

maker_bot_getty

Cosmo Wenman went to the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, took hundreds of pictures, documenting busts and reliefs from every accessible angle, and turned the photos into three-dimensional digital maps, using a free program called Autodesk 123D Catch.

Then he used the maps to print miniature plastic replicas on the $2,000 MakerBot 3-D printer in his home office.

And he… read more

3D counterpart to graphene discovered [UPDATE]

Promises faster transistors and more compact hard drives
January 20, 2014

topological_dirac_semimetal

DOE Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers have discovered that sodium bismuthide can exist as a form of matter called a “three-dimensional topological Dirac semi-metal” (3DTDS).

“A 3DTDS is a natural three-dimensional counterpart to graphene with similar or even better electron mobility and velocity,” says Yulin Chen, a physicist with Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source (ALS) when he initiated the study that led to this discovery,… read more

3D ‘Crystal Ball’ Monitors

May 1, 2003

Perspecta, a new display technology using a rotating disk, provides a high-resolution 3D representation of an object that can be viewed from 360 degrees around the display, without the need for special goggles.

3D Display Offers Glimpse of Future Media

November 10, 2008

A 3D display system, developed by University of Southern California researchers, could one day transform visual entertainment.

The 3D display can project both virtual as well as real images from a recorded movie, is autosterescopic (viewers don´t need to wear special viewing glasses to see the 3D effects), and is also omnidirectional, so that multiple viewers can watch the display from all directions and heights.

3D graphene could replace expensive platinum in solar cells

August 22, 2013

A field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) image of 3D honeycomb-structured graphene. The novel material can replace platinum in dye-sensitized solar cells with virtually no loss of generating capacity. Hui Wang image

Michigan Technological University, scientists have replaced expensive ($1,500 an ounce) platinum in solar cells with low-cost 3D graphene.

Regular graphene is a two-dimensional form of carbon. Yun Hang Hu, the Charles and Caroll McArthur Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at MTU, and his team invented a way to synthesize a 3D version, with a honeycomb-like structure.

The 3D graphene had excellent conductivity and high… read more

3D imaging methodology reveals nano details not seen before

Understanding nanoparticles at atomic scale in three dimensions could improve materials
March 28, 2013

A representation of a 3-D atomic resolution screw dislocation in a platinum nanoparticle. (Illustration: Chien-Chun Chen and I-Sheng Chou, UCLA)

A team of scientists from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Northwestern University has produced 3-D images and videos of a tiny platinum nanoparticle at atomic resolution that reveal new details of defects in nanomaterials that have not been seen before.

Prior to this work, scientists only had flat, two-dimensional images with which to view the arrangement of atoms.

The… read more

3D IR images now in full color

August 7, 2013

Spectro-microtomographic images of a human hair show absorptions of protein (red) and phospholipid (blue-green). Center, the medulla is observed to have little protein. Bottom, the medulla has higher concentrations of phospholipids.

Researchers have created a non-destructive 3D imaging technique that provides molecular-level chemical information of unprecedented detail on biological and other specimens with no need to stain or alter the specimen.

Developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM), the technique combines Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with computed tomography (CT-scans).

“The… read more

3D maps let travellers take virtual city tours

November 7, 2006

Microsoft’s updated Virtual Earth mapping software includes photo-realistic three-dimensional models of real buildings and other structures.

3D maps show brain gene activity

June 25, 2002

A 3D map of the brain’s genetic activity should help researchers pinpoint the neurological underpinnings of autism, schizophrenia and other brain disorders.

3D mash-up maps let you ‘edit’ the world

December 1, 2009

(Ordnance Survey)

As part of a project to demonstrate the potential of 3D mapping, lasers were fired at the coastal resort of Bournemouth in southern England from the ground and from the air to capture the height of buildings, trees and other features, using a technique called Lidar.

Adding information from aerial photos and traditional surveys produced a full-color 3D map, built up from more than 700 million points. The map… read more

3D material that behaves like graphene discovered

June 5, 2014

Scientists at Oxford, SLAC, Stanford and Berkeley Lab have discovered that a sturdy 3-D material, cadmium arsenide, mimics the electronic behavior of 2-D graphene. This illustration depicts fast-moving, massless electrons inside the material. The discovery could lead to new and faster types of electronic devices. (Credit: Greg Stewart/SLAC)

Cadmium arsenide could yield practical devices with the same extraordinary electronic properties as 2D graphene, researchers from Oxford, SLAC, and Berkeley Lab have found.

In addition, the new “semimetal” material exists in a sturdy 3D form that should be much easier to shape into electronic devices such as very fast transistors, sensors and transparent electrodes, the researchers say.

The results are described… read more

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