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Worm-inspired robot crawls through intestines

June 7, 2006

A robot designed to crawl through the human gut by mimicking the wriggling motion of an undersea worm could one day help doctors diagnose disease by carrying tiny cameras through patients’ bodies.

Worm mind control

Using precisely-targeted lasers, researchers manipulate neurons in worms' brains and take control of their behavior
September 25, 2012


In the quest to understand how the brain turns sensory input into behavior, scientists have crossed a major threshold.

Using precisely-targeted lasers, Harvard researchers have taken over an animal’s brain, instructing miniature nematode worms Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) to turn in any direction they choose by manipulating neurons in the worms’ “brain.”

They even implanted false sensory information, fooling the animal into thinking food was nearby.… read more

Worm Infects Millions of Computers Worldwide

January 23, 2009

A new digital plague has hit the Internet, known as Conficker or Downadup, infecting millions of personal and business Windows-based computers in what seems to be the first step of an unknown multistage attack.

Experts say it is the worst infection since the Slammer worm exploded through the Internet in January 2003, and it may have infected as many as nine million personal computers around the world.

Worm ‘EEG’ tests neural effects of drugs

May 24, 2013

C elegans nematode (credit: The Goldstein Lab)

Scientists from the University of Southampton have developed a microfluidic electrophysiological device called a NeuroChip that records the neural activity in the microscopic worm Caenorhadbitis elegans  (C. elegans) — the worm equivalent of an EEG —.to help test the effects of drugs.

How to record a worm’s ‘EEG’

With the NeuroChip, you feed the  worm into a narrow, fluid-filled channel that tapers at… read more

World’s thinnest piezoelectricity generator

Could lead to wearable electronic devices based on MoS2 that are transparent, extremely light, and very bendable and stretchable
October 16, 2014

Positive and negative polarized charges are squeezed from a single layer of atoms, as it is being stretched. (Credit: Lei Wang / Columbia Engineering)

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and Georgia Institute of Technology reported Wednesday (Oct. 15) that they have made the first experimental observation of piezoelectricity (generation of electricity from mechanical stress) and the piezotronic effect (using piezoelectricity as a semiconductor gate to control current flow in a device) in an atomically thin material, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) — potentially resulting in devices that are optically transparent, extremely… read more

World’s smallest, fastest nanomotor

They could one day move through the body at high speed to deliver drugs to target cells
May 21, 2014

Nanomotor drug delivery. After coating the nanomotor with biochemicals, the researchers were able to control the speed and rate of drug delivery to a cell in the lab. (Credit: Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin)

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have built the “smallest, fastest, and longest-running” nanomotor  to date — an important step toward developing miniature machines that could one day move through the body to deliver drugs such as insulin for diabetics when needed, or target and treat cancer cells without harming good cells, the scientists say.

Led by Cockrell School of Engineering mechanical engineering assistant… read more

World’s smallest autopilot for micro aircraft

August 27, 2013


Researcher Bart Remes and his team of the Micro Aerial Vehicle Laboratory at the TU Delft faculty of Aerospace Engineering have designed, built and tested the world’s smallest open source autopilot for small unmanned aircraft.

A smaller — and lighter — autopilot allows these small flying robots to fly longer, fit into narrower spaces or carry more payloads, such as cameras. That makes them more… read more

World’s most human-like android head

April 26, 2013


Dr. Dmitry Itskov, founder of the 2045 Initiative and Global Future 2045 congress (GF2045), announced Thursday that he will unveil Dr. David Hanson’s latest android, the Dmitry Avatar-A head — the “world’s most human-like android head” — at the GF2045 congress, scheduled for June 15–16 at Lincoln Center in New York City.

The new android, a robotic replica of Itskov’s head, is being created by… read more

World’s lightest material is 100 times lighter than Styrofoam

November 18, 2011

Ultra light metal

The world’s lightest material — with a density of 0.9 mg/cc — about 100 times lighter than Styrofoam — has been developed by a team of researchers from UC Irvine, HRL Laboratories, and the California Institute of Technology.

The new material, using nickel-phosphorous thin films, redefines the limits of lightweight materials because of its unique “micro-lattice” cellular architecture. The researchers were able to make a material that… read more

World’s first nano-enhanced carbon fiber marine products

Nanocomposite-based door weighs 66% less than traditional doors and is more durable, says nanotech pioneer company Zyvex
June 26, 2012


Zyvex Marine, a division of the world’s first molecular nanotechnology company, Zyvex Technologies, and Pacific Coast Marine announced a partnership to make the industry’s lightest and most durable doors, hatches, and other marine closures using nanocomposites.

They are unveiling a door that weighs 66% less than a traditional door – from 150 pounds to just 50 pounds each – and is more durable.

Zyvex… read more

World’s first $1,000 genome enables ‘factory’ scale sequencing for population and disease studies

January 15, 2014

The HiSeq X™ Ten, composed of 10 HiSeq X Systems (credit: Illumina)


Illumina, Inc. announced Tuesday that its new HiSeq X Ten Sequencing System has broken the “sound barrier” of human genomics by enabling the $1,000 genome.

“This platform includes dramatic technology breakthroughs that enable researchers to undertake studies of unprecedented scale by providing the throughput to sequence tens of thousands of human whole genomes in a single year in a single… read more

Worldwide warning issued on mercury-contaminated fish

March 12, 2007

The health risks posed by mercury contaminated fish is sufficient to warrant issuing a worldwide general warning to the public–especially children and women of childbearing age–to be careful about how much and which fish they eat.

The declaration, developed at the Eighth International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant, is a synopsis of the latest scientific knowledge about the danger posed by mercury pollution.

It… read more

WorldWide Telescope peers into Big Dipper

February 28, 2008

Microsoft presented its WorldWide Telescope (WWT) program today at the TED conference.

WorldWide Telescope, which is similar to the sky feature in Google Earth but much more expansive, is a virtual map of space that features tens of millions of digital images from sources like the Hubble telescope and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

From the desktop, the technology lets people pan and zoom across the night sky,… read more

Worldwide mobile data traffic will be 75 exabytes a year by 2015

February 2, 2011

Worldwide mobile data traffic will increase 26-fold during 2010 – 2015 reaching 75 exabytes a year by 2015 due to a projected surge in mobile Internet-enabled devices delivering popular video applications and services, according to the Cisco® Visual Networking Index (VNI) Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast for 2010 to 2015.

This traffic increase represents a compound annual growth rate of 92 percent over the same period. Two major… read more

Worldwide Future Day kicks off at noon March 1 in New Zealand

"We need to do everything in our power to make the future a radically better place, by any means necessary." --- DJ Steve Aoki comment re Future Day from his concert venue in Sao Paulo, Brazil
February 28, 2014


“The future is already here — it’s just not evenly distributed,” William Gibson famously said. Future Day aims to do something about that.

The global event begins at noon March 1 in New Zealand (6 PM Friday Feb. 28 in New York), when Stephanie Pride of the World Futures Studies Federation launches the Future Day Google Hangout, and continues in cities around the… read more

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