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10.20GHz Intel Nehalem slated for 2005

January 29, 2003

Intel is reportedly planning 10.20GHz desktop CPUs code-named “Nehalem” by 2005.

Intel is also planning the 5.20GHz “Prescott” core and the 9.20GHz “Tejas” core by then.

$100 billion could yield two million ‘green’ jobs

September 11, 2008

A $100 billion US government investment over two years could create 2 million “green” jobs in such industrial sectors as steel and construction, according to environmental and labor groups.

$100 Genome

February 27, 2009

BioNanomatrix is pursuing what may be the key to personalized medicine: sequencing technology so fast and cheap that an entire human genome can be read in eight hours for $100 or less.

$100 Laptop to Cost $175, Run Windows as Well as Linux

April 30, 2007

The founder of the ambitious “$100 laptop” project, which plans to give inexpensive computers to school children in developing countries, revealed Thursday that the machine for now costs $175, and it will be able to run Windows in addition to Linux.

$100 Million Donation Helps to Establish a Genome Institute

June 23, 2003

Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will establish an institute intended to apply knowledge of the human genome to the practice of medicine.

The institute will try to determine the molecular causes of disease by systematically examining genes and proteins. That could lead to new ways to prevent and diagnose illnesses and to treat their causes rather than just their symptoms, as many medicines now do.

$100 million gift launches Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center at UCSD

November 11, 2013

huma-ipsc-derived-neuron-deerinck

Businessman and philanthropist T. Denny Sanford has committed $100 million to the creation of the Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).

The Sanford Center will accelerate development of drugs and cell therapies inspired by and derived from current human stem cell research; establishing, promoting and disseminating clinical trials and patient therapies that will help more quickly transform promise… read more

100 Year Starship Study report

January 5, 2012

Project Daedalus

Physics World’s January issue features a report on the 100 Year Starship Study (100YSS) conference, where delegates, from ex-astronauts to engineers, artists, students, and science-fiction writers, looked at the range of issues facing scientists who would like to make interstellar travel a reality.

Starting with the development of a rocket engine that can reach high velocity, humans are not short of initiative, but, as Perkowitz describes, even… read more

100-metre nanotube thread pulled from furnace

March 12, 2004

A thread of carbon nanotubes more than 100 meters long has been pulled from a furnace. The previous record holder was a mere 30 centimeters long.

By bundling the nanotubes together into much longer fibers, scientists hope to harness their properties on a larger scale. For example, embedding long carbon nanotube threads in plastic would allow tougher composites for airplane hulls.

’1000 genomes barrier’ broken

Will help researchers interpret genetic changes in people with disease
November 1, 2012

population_variants

A landmark project that has sequenced 1,092 human genomes from individuals around the world will help researchers to interpret the genetic changes in people with disease.

This first study to break the “1000 genomes barrier” will enable scientists to begin to examine genetic variations at the scale of the populations of individual countries, as well as guiding them in their search for the rare genetic variations related… read more

111 organizations call for synthetic biology moratorium

March 15, 2012

SynBioHelloWorld

Synthetic biology needs more oversight, and the government needs to put in place regulations specific for this field, according to 111 environmental, watchdog, and other organizations, which have released a report with specific recommendations for managing new biological techniques for building and remaking organisms for research and commercial uses ranging from medicines to biofuels.

Calling synthetic biology “an extreme form of genetic engineering,” the report said… read more

12 new universities join Coursera, now offering more than 100 courses

July 20, 2012

Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Computation course

Coursera has announced that 12 universities — including three international institutions — will be joining Princeton University, Stanford University, University of Michigan, and University of Pennsylvania in offering Coursera classes, according to the Coursera Blog.

On Coursera, you will now be able to access world-class courses from:

read more

13 things that do not make sense

March 18, 2005

There are many scientific observations that simply defy explanation, such as the placebo effect, the horizon problem (the microwave background radiation filling the cosmos is at the same temperature everywhere), ultra-energetic cosmic rays, dark matter, and Viking’s methane.

140 Characters Is The New Container For Ideas …

March 3, 2009

Like it or not, 140 characters or less is currently a new container for ideas. And if you want to go viral, expressing your idea in 120 characters or less is even better (so that others can retweet (forward your tweet).

15 Tech Concepts You’ll Need To Know In 2006

January 16, 2006

The body area network, perpendicular storage on hard drives, 10 GB NAND flash memory, and mobile satellite video are among the scientific and technological breakthroughs expected in 2006.

150-Year-Old Computer Brought to Life

April 25, 2008
The Difference Engine, a complex mechanical computer, can handle logarithms and trigonometry (Doron Swade)

Designed nearly 150 years ago but never actually built until recently, one of two Babbage Difference Engines will go on display for the first time in North America, at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, starting May 10.

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