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A Google Prototype for a Precision Image Search

April 29, 2008

Google researchers say they have developed a new software technology intended to do for digital images on the Web what the company’s original PageRank software did for searches of Web pages.

Their VisualRank algorithm combines image-recognition software methods with techniques for weighting and ranking images that look most similar.

A Grand plan for brainy robots

March 19, 2004

On a good day, Lucy can tell a banana apart from an apple. And that’s handy skill to have if you are an orangutan. Even a robotic one….

A grand unified theory of AI

March 30, 2010

By combining the old rule-based systems with insights from new probabilistic statistical systems, MIT research scientist Noah Goodman has found a way to model thought that could have broad implications for both AI and cognitive science.

More info: MIT News

A graphene replacement made from plastic

July 8, 2014

Spin-coating a polymer solution (green) to create a carbon nanosheet with characteristics similar to graphene but without the defects (black) (credit: Nanoscale)

A team of Korean researchers has synthesized hexagonal carbon nanosheets similar to graphene, using a polymer. The new material is free of the defects and complexity involved in producing graphene, and can substitute for graphene as transparent electrodes for organic solar cells and in semiconductor chips, the researchers say.

The research team is led by Han-Ik Joh at Korea Institute of Science and Technology  (KIST),… read more

A graphene-based light sensor 1,000 times more sensitive than current sensors

June 3, 2013

graphene FET

A new graphene-based image sensor invented at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore is 1,000 times more sensitive to light than current imaging sensors found in today’s cameras and uses 10 times less energy because it operates at lower voltages, according to researchers.

The new nanoscale sensor is also believed to be the first to be able to detect a broad spectrum of light, from… read more

A graphene/nanotube hybrid

November 29, 2012

Forests of Nanotubes

A seamless graphene/nanotube hybrid created at Rice University may be the best electrode interface material possible for many energy storage and electronics applications.

Led by Rice chemist James Tour, researchers have successfully grown forests of carbon nanotubes that rise quickly from sheets of graphene to astounding lengths of up to 120 microns. A house on an average plot with the same… read more

A Green Energy Industry Takes Root in California

February 1, 2008

Investment in solar power is rising in California, the product of billions of dollars in investment and mountains of enthusiasm.

A gripper using soft robotics

January 14, 2014

versaball

A robot gripper invented by researchers at the University of Chicago and Cornell University is now available commercially from Empire Robotics as VERSABALL for industrial automation, scheduled to ship later in January.

Company officials believe the technology might also be useful for prosthetic devices that can assist with work tasks, for in-home assistive devices, and in mobile military robots.

How it works

Robotic grippers that… read more

A Growing Intelligence Around Earth

October 26, 2006

NASA’s EO-1 is a new breed of satellite with AI programming to notice things that change (like the plume of a volcano) and take appropriate action, such as monitoring that specific location.

EO-1 can re-organize its own priorities to study volcanic eruptions, flash floods, forest fires, disintegrating sea-ice, and other unexpected events. It can also use sensors on other satellites or on the ground as a “sensorweb.”

A Ham Radio Weekend for Talking to the Moon

June 27, 2009

On Saturday, amateur radio operators will bounce signals off the moon, using parabolic antenna radio telescopes around the world.

Also see Echoes of Apollo

A ‘hands-on’ approach to computers

April 7, 2009
(Donna Coveney)

MIT Media Lab researcher Hiroshi Ishii wants people to be able to interact with their computers and other devices by moving around and by handling real physical objects: by doing what comes naturally.

A hands-on approach to Third World aid

July 14, 2008

About 60 people from 20 nations will descend on the MIT campus today to begin the International Development Design Summit, an intensive month-long process of creating technological solutions for the needs of people in the world’s developing nations.

The goal of the program is to develop simple, inexpensive devices that in some cases can be produced locally and make a real difference for people and communities.

Several of… read more

A Heart Device Is Found Vulnerable to Hacker Attacks

March 12, 2008

Computer security researchers have shown they could reprogram, shut down and deliver jolts of electricity to a combination heart defibrillator-pacemaker that would potentially be fatal.

They also showed they could glean personal patient data by eavesdropping on the device, made by Medtronic.

A Helping Hand for Surgery

August 28, 2008
(Timothy Leong/JHU)

Johns Hopkins University researchers have developed a tiny handlike gripper that can grasp tissue or cell samples and could make it easier for doctors to perform minimally invasive surgery, such as biopsies.

The device curls its “fingers” around an object when triggered chemically, and it can be moved around remotely with a magnet.

A hidden genetic code for better designer genes

How rare "words" in bacterial genes boost protein production
October 1, 2013

Codon

Scientists routinely seek to reprogram bacteria to produce proteins for drugs, biofuels and more, but they have struggled to get those bacteria to follow orders.

A hidden feature of the genetic code, it turns out, could achieve that.  The feature controls how much of the desired protein bacteria produce, a team from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University reported in… read more

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