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A nanotech fix for nicotine dependence

July 5, 2013

nicotine_nano_vaccine

Yung Chang and her colleagues at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute have launched an ambitious new project designed to attack nicotine dependence in a radically new way.

The research effort, pursued under a new $3.3 million grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, will attempt to design a vaccine conferring immunity to nicotine, using nanoscale structures assembled from DNA.… read more

A nanotechnology biosensor for Salmonella detection

March 17, 2008

An international team of researchers has built a nanoscale biosensor that detects food-borne bacteria.

The biosensor has a mix of gold and silver nanorods with antibodies to capture Salmonella bacteria. The Salmonella bacteria then cause the dye molecules to produce an enhanced fluorescence signal, even with a small number of bacteria present.

Food-borne pathogens cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,000 deaths in the United States… read more

A nanowire endoscope for imaging inside a single cell

December 22, 2011

Endoscope Sensing

An endoscope that can provide high-resolution optical images of the interior of a single living cell, or precisely deliver genes, proteins, therapeutic drugs or other cargo without injuring or damaging the cell, has been developed by researchers from Berkeley Lab and the University of California (UC) Berkeley.

The researchers  attached a tin-oxide nanowire waveguide to the tapered end of an optical fiber to create a novel endoscope system. Light… read more

A Nanowire with a Surprise

October 19, 2004

Brookhaven National Laboratory researchers have discovered that a short organic chain molecule with nanometer dimensions conducts electrons in a surprising way: it regulates the electrons’ speed erratically, without a predictable dependence on the length of the wire.

In research on oligophenyleneethynylene (OPE) nanowires, researchers found that as they increased the length of the OPE wire from one to four PE units, the electrons moved across the wire faster, slower,… read more

A Net of Control

December 13, 2003

Picture, if you will, an information infrastructure that encourages censorship, surveillance and suppression of the creative impulse. Where anonymity is outlawed and every penny spent is accounted for. Where the powers that be can smother subversive (or economically competitive) ideas in the cradle, and no one can publish even a laundry list without the imprimatur of Big Brother. Some prognosticators are saying that such a construct is nearly inevitable. And… read more

A neural net that diagnoses epilepsy

April 29, 2009

Texas Tech University researchers have developed a way to automatically diagnose epilepsy with an accuracy rate of 94 percent, by training a neural network to recognize the characteristic patterns in EEG data that indicate the patient is epileptic.

A neuromorphic-computing ‘roadmap’

April 22, 2014

Professor Jennifer Hasler displays a field programmable analog array (FPAA) board that includes an integrated circuit with biological-based neuron structures for power-efficient calculation.  Hasler’s research indicates that this type of board, which is programmable but has low power requirements, could play an important role in advancing neuromorphic computing. (Credit: Rob Felt)

Electrical engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have  published a roadmap that details innovative analog-based techniques that they believe could make it possible to build a practical neuromorphic (brain-inspired) computer while minimizing energy requirements.

“A configurable analog-digital system can be expected to have a power efficiency improvement of up to 10,000 times compared to an all-digital system,” said Jennifer Hasler, a professor in the Georgia… read more

A new — and reversible — cause of aging

NAD, a naturally produced compound in cells, rewinds aspects of age-related demise in mice
December 20, 2013

sirt1_protein

Researchers have discovered a cause of aging in mammals that may be reversible: a series of molecular events that enable communication inside cells between the nucleus and mitochondria.

As communication breaks down, aging accelerates. By administering a molecule naturally produced by the human body, scientists restored the communication network in older mice. Subsequent tissue samples showed key biological hallmarks that were comparable to those of much younger animals.… read more

A new 3D view of DNA

March 13, 2012

A 3-D image that shows how DNA packs itself tightly into a structure known as a “fractal globule.” The structure is unique in that the genome is completely unknotted, meaning, that “despite how densely it’s packed, you can pull on it, easily get to the region you want to transcribe, read it off, and put it back when you’re done,” explained Erez Lieberman Aiden (credit: Miriam Huntley, Rob Scharein, and Erez Lieberman-Aiden)

A new imaging technique is giving scientists their first three-dimensional view of the human genome,

The finding, by Erez Lieberman Aiden, a Junior Fellow of the Society of Fellows, working with Nynke van Berkum, Louise Williams, and a team of researchers from the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and the University of Massachusetts Medical School, suggests that how DNA is packed into cells may be at least… read more

A New Approach to Combatting HIV

March 6, 2008

University of Michigan researchers have developed nanoemulsion vaccines–made up of tiny soybean oil droplets suspended in water, studded with bits of pathogenic organisms, and swabbed into the nose–that may be the vaccines of the future.

Previously proved effective against influenza and anthrax, they have now been shown to generate immunity to smallpox and HIV in mice.

A New Approach to Fusion

July 31, 2009

General Fusion says it can build a prototype fusion power plant within the next decade and do it for less than a billion dollars, using using relatively low-tech, mechanical brute force and advanced digital control technologies, instead of expensive superconducting magnets or powerful lasers.

A New Approach to Treating Alzheimer’s

May 12, 2008

Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano at the University of Toronto is testing electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus as a novel treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.

A New Arms Race to Build the World’s Mightiest Computer

August 19, 2005

A global race is under way to reach the next milestone in supercomputer performance, many times the speed of today’s most powerful machines.

But the fastest American machines are used primarily for military applications at the nation’s weapons laboratories. Many scientists and technology executives in the United States are concerned about losing out in crucial markets like oil and gas exploration, automobile design and manufacturing unless they, too, have… read more

A New Company to Focus on Artificial Intelligence

March 24, 2005

Palm Computing co-founders Jeff Hawkins and Donna Dubinsky will announce today the creation of Numenta, a technology development firm that will conduct research in an effort to extend Mr. Hawkins’s AI theories, described in his book “On Intelligence: How a New Understanding of the Brain Will Lead to the Creation of Truly Intelligent Machines.”

Hawkins is demonstrating a pattern-recognition application using a version of his software. It allows a… read more

A New Cryptography Uses the Quirks of Photon Streams

November 4, 2002

MagiQ Technologies plans to offer a cryptogaphy system using quantum key distribution in 2003.

Keys to the code are transmitted as a stream of photons, sent over a fiber optic cable. Security is based on quantum physics: observing the transmission would alter the photons, rendering their information useless to any eavesdroppers.

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