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A New Face: A Bold Surgeon, an Untried Surgery

July 26, 2005

Dr. Maria Siemionow of the Cleveland Clinic is planning to undertake what may be the most shocking medical procedure to occur in decades: a face transplant.

Her team has managed to induce long-term tolerance to hind-leg transplants with a drug regimen lasting only seven days. If similar results can be achieved in humans (many previous efforts along these lines have failed), the advance will alter the calculus behind transplantations,… read more

A New Family of Molecules for Self-Assembly: The Carboranes

March 25, 2009

Researchers at Penn State and the Sigma-Aldrich company have found a way to control geometry and stability in making a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of molecules on a surface by making SAMs out of different carboranethiol isomers, which are cage-like molecules.

These SAMs can selectively capture biomolecules from complex mixtures, for example.

A new form of carbon: ‘grossly warped nanographenes’

Contorted sheets of graphene alter physical, optical and electronic properties of new material
July 17, 2013

Chemists at Boston College and Nagoya University in Japan have synthesized the first example of a new form of carbon. The new material consists of multiple identical pieces of "grossly warped graphene," each containing exactly 80 carbon atoms joined together in a network of 26 rings, with 30 hydrogen atoms decorating the rim. Because they measure slightly more than a nanometer across, these individual molecules are referred to generically as "nanocarbons."</p>
<p>Credit: Nature Chemistry

Chemists at Boston College and Nagoya University in Japan have synthesized the first example of a new form of carbon

The new material consists of multiple identical pieces of grossly warped graphene, each containing exactly 80 carbon atoms joined together in a network of 26 rings, with 30 hydrogen atoms decorating the rim.

Grossly warped nanographenes

Because they measure slightly more than a… read more

A new high-resolution method for imaging below the skin using a liquid lens

February 21, 2011

This prototype device may eliminate the need for many biopsies to detect skin cancer. (J. Adam Fenster)

University of Rochester optics professor Jannick Rolland has developed an optical technology that provides unprecedented images under the skin’s surface.

The aim of the technology is to detect and examine skin lesions to determine whether they are benign or cancerous without having to cut the suspected tumor out of the skin and analyze it in the lab. Instead, the tip of a roughly one-foot-long cylindrical probe is placed in… read more

A New Kind of Genomics, With an Eye on Ecosystems

October 21, 2003

Researchers are beginning to sequence “metagenomes,” the DNA of entire microbial ecosystems.

Some scientists think can will be used to find new enzymes, monitor the health of environments, predict environmental impacts, and find patterns in the bacterial population in humans that will predict when someone is about to get sick.

A new kind of micro-mobility: Moving tiny particles using magnetic fields

December 15, 2009

A new system devised by MIT researchers could provide a novel method for moving tiny objects inside a microchip, for biomedical screening or the detection of trace elements for pollution monitoring or security screening, or might someday be developed for use in medical diagnostics, by allowing controlled delivery of particles inside the body to specifically targeted locations.

The researchers devised a system that uses tiny beads made… read more

A New Kind of Microchip

August 18, 2010

(Lyric Semiconductor)

Lyric Semiconductor has unveiled a “probability processor” computer chip that performs calculations using probabilities, instead of binary logic. It could accelerate everything from online banking systems to the flash memory in smart phones and other gadgets.

A New Kindle While Journalism Burns

February 8, 2009

Can the new Kindle, being introduced Monday, save the publishing business?

A New Look at Large Biomolecules

August 20, 2001

A new method for studying the electrical charges of large biological molecules may enable researchers to make a leap from modeling molecules of 50,000 atoms to those of more than a million atoms. This may make it possible to develop more effective anti-cancer drugs.

View a QuickTime movie of a “fly-through” of a microtubule
The technique, developed by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers… read more

A new material for 3D-printing electrodes

New resin for making electrodes uses lasers for molding into almost any 3-D shape
May 31, 2013

Two microstructures made with the new material, containing the highest concentration of RDGE. Left: Pre-charring. These pyramid and bunny models did not respond to the preferred method of 3-D shaping, so they were created using an alternative process. Right: Post-charring. Notice that the pyramid and bunny shrink significantly less than those made from the material with a lower concentration of RDGE. Credit: Optical Materials Express.

A new resin material that can be molded into complex, highly conductive 3-D structures with features just a few microns across has been developed by Tokyo Institute of Technology and C-MET, Inc.

Combined with state-of-the-art micro-sculpting techniques, the new resin holds promise for making customized electrodes for fuel cells or batteries, or biosensor interfaces for medical uses.

The research team, which includes physicists and chemists from Yokohama… read more

A new method for harvesting energy from light

September 12, 2013

Researchers fabricated nanostructures with various photoconduction properties (credit: American Chemical Society)

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have demonstrated a new mechanism for extracting energy from light, a finding that could improve technologies for generating electricity from solar energy and lead to more efficient optoelectronic devices used in communications.

The research centers on plasmonic nanostructures, specifically, materials fabricated from gold particles and light-sensitive molecules of porphyin, of precise sizes and arranged in specific patterns.

Plasmons, or a… read more

A new method for producing clean hydrogen

May 23, 2013

TEM_image_Au-a-Fe2O3_catalyst

Duke University engineers have developed a novel method for producing clean hydrogen, which could prove essential to weaning society off of fossil fuels and their environmental implications.

While hydrogen is ubiquitous in the environment, producing and collecting molecular hydrogen for transportation and industrial uses is expensive and complicated. Just as importantly, a byproduct of most current methods of producing hydrogen is carbon monoxide, which is… read more

A new micro-robotic technique for 3D-printing tissues

February 21, 2014

Two-dimensional micro-robotic coding of material composition

A new magnetic micro-robotic technique for assembling components of the complex materials used in tissue engineering* and 3D printing of cell materials has been developed by Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Carnegie Mellon University.

Described in Nature Communications, the technique allows for precise construction of individual cell-encapsulating hydrogels (such as cell blocks).

Described in the Jan. 28, 2014, issue of Nature Communicationsthe research… read more

A New Model Army Soldier Rolls Closer to Battle

February 17, 2005

Robot soldiers will think, see and react increasingly like humans. In the beginning, they will be remote-controlled, looking and acting like lethal toy trucks. As the technology develops, they may take many shapes. And as their intelligence grows, so will their autonomy.

Robots in battle, as envisioned by their builders, may look and move like humans or hummingbirds, tractors or tanks, cockroaches or crickets. With the development of nanotechnology,… read more

A new net

February 6, 2012

nicira

Just-launched Nicira hopes to make the Internet more powerful and more secure than ever before.

Its Network Virtualization Platform software, aimed at the operators of data centers like Rackspace, blocks the programs running on the servers from interacting with the surrounding network hardware, simulating physical routers and switches.

Administrators can swiftly reprogram the virtual network to offer each application a private connection to the rest of the Internet. That… read more

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