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A new tool for precise brain mapping

Optogenetic infrared light precisely illuminates neural pathways in the brain
May 21, 2013

A new tool that could help map and track the interactions between neurons in different areas of the brain is being developed by University of Texas Arlington assistant professor of physics Samarendra Mohanty.

The technology would be useful in the BRAIN (Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) mapping initiative.

This new method, which uses a fiber-optic, two-photon, optogenetic stimulator, has been used on… read more

A new tool to reveal structure of proteins

March 21, 2012

protein

A new solid state NMR method that uses paramagnetic tags to help visualize the shape of protein molecules has been developed by Christopher Jaroniec, associate professor of chemistry at Ohio State University, and colleagues.

The new method could help researchers understand biological molecules involved in causing disease and those performing critical functions in healthy cells.

For roughly a decade, a technique called solid state nuclear magnetic resonance… read more

A New Treatment for Alzheimer’s?

January 16, 2008

A drug commonly used to treat arthritis caused a dramatic and rapid improvement in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, according to physicians in California. However, scientists and others not involved in the work worry that the report, which was based on trials in a few patients and hasn’t been independently confirmed, may offer little more than false hope for Alzheimer’s sufferers and their families.

See also: Jan 10read more

A new tumor-killer

May 23, 2013

saxs_hamlet

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and Lund University, Sweden, have bioengineered a novel molecule proven to successfully kill tumor cells.

This molecule is based on a natural protein present in human breast milk, which has been found to have strong and wide-ranging tumor killing properties when bound to certain lipids. Lipids are organic molecules like amino acids and carbohydrates, made up of carbon and… read more

A New Twist on Light Speed

June 27, 2002

Glasgow scientists have measured a single photon’s orbital angular momentum for the first time. The research could lead to speeding up optical communications by allowing each photon sent over fiber optic lines to encode multiple bits as quantum orbital states.

Measuring the Orbital Angular Momentum of a Single Photon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 257901 (2002) (June 24, 2002)

A new twist on nanoparticle behavior

September 24, 2008

Drug makers and regulators should consider the effects of nanoparticle size and surface when developing and monitoring therapies using nanoparticles, University College Dublin research suggests.

The researchers found that the “corona” (cloud of proteins and other biomolecules that adheres to a nanoparticle immersed in biological media) changes depending on the size of the nanoparticle and the charge on its surface, which can affect the particles’ therapeutic action in the… read more

A New Type of Atomic Microscope Getting Closer

October 1, 2008

Researchers at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid have created an ultrasmooth mirror that reflects a beam of helium atoms instead of electrons and could provide the same resolution as existing electron microscopes without damaging or destroying delicate biological samples.

A New View of Our Universe: Only One of Many

October 29, 2002

Some cosmologists imagine universes sprouting from one another in an endless geometric progression. Others imagine island universes floating and even colliding in a fifth dimension.

Some cosmologists say the observable universe could be only a small patch in a much vaster ensemble bred endlessly in a chain of big bangs.

A new way to assemble cells into 3-D microtissues

March 6, 2009

Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory can now control how cells connect with one another in vitro and self-assemble into three-dimensional, multicellular microtissues that could be used in medicine for a range of applications such as skin grafts, bone marrow transplants, or blood substitutes, as well as in basic medical and biological research.

A new way to beam power to medical chips deep inside the body

Wireless system uses the same power as a cell phone to safely transmit energy to chips, paving the way for new "electroceutical" devices to treat illness or alleviate pain
May 20, 2014

A batteryless electrostimulator next to grains of rice (credit: Austin Yee)

A Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body, and use this power to run tiny electronic medical gadgets such as pacemakers, nerve stimulators, or new sensors and devices yet to be developed.

The discoveries reported Monday May 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) culminate years of efforts by Ada Poon, an assistant professor of electrical engineering,… read more

A New Way to Control Weight?

November 29, 2007

University of Missouri-Columbia researchers have found that sitting results in retention of fat (from lipase reduction), lower HDL (good cholesterol), and overall reduction in metabolic rate.

Related news: “Walkstation” burns calories at work

A new way to create ‘building blocks’ for drugs

October 3, 2012

synthetically_useful_byarils

A new way to prepare biaryls — compounds that are essential building blocks in the creation of drugs and many modern materials such as LEDs — using gold as a catalyst is described by University of Bristol researchers in Science.

Gold catalysis is easier, cheaper and more environmentally friendly than current methods that use palladium as a catalyst.

Biaryls, compounds containing two directly connected benzene… read more

A new way to fight cancer: fasting before chemotherapy

April 1, 2008

University of Southern California researchers studying mice found that fasting for two days protected healthy cells against chemotherapy.

The same chemotherapy dose killed half of the normally fed mice and caused lasting weight and energy loss in survivors.

Test tube experiments with human cells confirmed the finding. Starved normal cells go into a “maintenance mode”–extreme resistance to stresses, but tumors don’t stop growing.

A new way to flip bits

July 21, 2003

Physicists in Japan have shown that electric fields could be used to improve the performance of magnetic data storage devices. Hideo Ohno and colleagues at Tohoku University demonstrated that the magnetic field needed to reverse the magnetization in a storage bit can be reduced by applying an electric field. By making it easier to “flip” the magnetization of a material, the new method could have applications in ultrahigh-density information storage… read more

A new way to freeze molecules for quantum computing

March 29, 2013

ucla_cooling_molecules

Chilling molecules to a fraction of a degree above absolute zero, the temperature at which they can be manipulated to store and transmit data in quantum computers, has proven to be a difficult challenge for scientists.

At higher temperatures, molecules rocket around, bouncing into each other and exchanging energy. Any information a scientist attempted to store in such a chaotic system would quickly become gibberish.

Now,… read more

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