Most Recently Added Most commentedBy Title | Z-A

Water Found in Extrasolar Planet’s Atmosphere

April 10, 2007

Astronomers have detected water in the atmosphere of a planet outside our solar system for the first time.

The discovery, announced today, means one of the most crucial elements for life as we know it can exist around planets orbiting other stars.

Water Filters Rely on Nanotech

October 15, 2004

A slow, methodical transformation of the $400-billion-a-year water-management industry is currently in progress, and nanotechnology appears to be leading the way.

The promise of nanofiltration devices that “clean” polluted water, sifting out bacteria, viruses, heavy metals and organic material, is driving companies like Argonide and KX Industries, which developed technology used in Brita filters, to make nanotechnology-based filters for consumers. Two products incorporating nanotechnology are going to hit the… read more

Water Drop Holds a Trillion Computers

November 21, 2002

Researchers have built a machine that solves mathematical problems using DNA as software and enzymes as hardware. A trillion such biomolecular machines – working at more than 99.8% accuracy – can fit into a drop of water. Computers with DNA input and output have been made before, but they involved a laborious series of reactions, each needing human supervision. The new automaton requires only the right molecular mix.

Water Discovery Fuels Hope to Colonize the Moon

November 16, 2009

The LCROSS probe discovered the equivalent of a dozen 2-gallon buckets of water in the form of ice, in a crater at the lunar south pole.

Having that store of water on the moon could be a boon to possible future lunar camps. In addition to a source of drinking water, lunar water ice could be broken into its constituent hydrogen and oxygen atoms, ultimately to be used in… read more

Water discovered on Mars

September 27, 2013

The Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite found water in the dust, dirt and fine soil from the Rocknest site on Mars. (This file photo shows trenches Curiosity dug in October 2012.) (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

The first scoop of soil analyzed by the analytical suite in NASA’s Curiosity rover reveals that fine materials on the surface of Mars contain several percent water by weight.

The results were published today in Science as one article in a five-paper special section on the Curiosity mission.

“One of the most exciting results from this very first solid sample ingested by Curiosity is the high… read more

Water discovered in remnants of extrasolar rocky world orbiting white dwarf

October 14, 2013

wateryasteroidscience

Astrophysicists have found the first evidence of a water-rich rocky planetary body outside our solar system in its shattered remains orbiting a white dwarf.

A new study by scientists at the Universities of Warwick and Cambridge analyzed the dust and debris surrounding the white dwarf star GD61 170 light years away.

Using observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and the large telescopes of… read more

Watching the Watchers: Why Surveillance Is a Two-Way Street

December 18, 2007

The widespread availability of digital cameras and video-capable cellphones means that ubiquitous surveillance on the part of the little guys is moving, if anything, even faster than ubiquitous surveillance on the part of the big boys. And distribution tools like YouTube make it easier to get the footage to a large audience.

Watching the Insides of a Cell

November 16, 2006

Researchers at MIT’s George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Lab have detected tiny twitches and vibrations in the live membranes of individual cells and neurons by using a powerful and noninvasive imaging technique. The technique could be used in the future to create three-dimensional images, illuminating even finer activities within living cells.

The method uses an optical technique based on interferometry: a laser beam passed through a sample is compared with… read more

Watching the brain ‘switch off’ self-awareness

April 20, 2006

Researchers conducted a series of experiments using fMRI to pinpoint the brain activity associated with introspection and that linked to sensory function.

They found that the brain assumes a robotic functionality when it has to concentrate all its efforts on a difficult, timed task — only becoming “human” again when it has the luxury of time.

Watching the Brain in Action

August 23, 2006

MIT researchers have used two-photon microscopy to visualize chemical activity in individual brain cells of living animals.

The technique could be used to monitor cell activity in animal models of neurological disease or degeneration, or to test the effects of therapies in treating these conditions, or study plasticity, the ability of neurons and their connections to change in response to experience.

Watching The Body’s Metabolism Using Ultra Low Field MRI

November 11, 2009

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have replaced the large magnets needed for MRI by using a combination of “dynamic nuclear polarization” to align carbon 13 nuclei before they are injected into the body and a new generation of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS) to pick up the signals used to reconstruct an image.

That should make ultra low field MRI images of metabolism in action even easier to make… read more

Watching Over You

August 21, 2005

The MDKeeper, from Tadiran Spectralink, provides round-the-clock medical monitoring for at-risk patients.

It is worn like a watch and integrates various medical sensors, a Siemens GSM/GPRS radio module, and a built-in cellular speakerphone and processing unit to measure and transmit data to caregivers.

The MDKeeper measures vital signs, including pulse rate, cardiac rhythm (ECG or EKG), and blood oxygen levels. It can either store the data and transmit… read more

Watching How the Brain Works as It Weighs a Moral Dilemma

September 26, 2001

It is now possible to study scientifically how moral reasoning differs among individual people and across cultures, using functional brain imaging to detect brain activity via increases in blood flow.

A study published in the Sept. 14 issue of the journal Science showed that impersonal moral dilemmas, like deciding whether to keep the money in a found wallet, activated areas involved in working memory. However, personal moral dilemmas… read more

Watching fish thinking

February 1, 2013

zebrafish_thinking

Neuroscientists have found a way to watch neurons fire in an independently moving animal for the first time. The study was done in fish, but it may hold clues to how the human brain works, Science Now reports.

Junichi Nakai of Saitama University’s Brain Science Institute in Japan and colleagues selected a glowing marker known as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and linked it to a compound that… read more

Watching Cancer Cells Die

March 3, 2006

A nano sensor, developed by scientists at the Center for Molecular Imaging Research at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital, detects apoptosis (cell suicide).

The sensor could directly signal whether a drug is working or not by looking at individual cells. The detector uses an iron-oxide nanoparticle, which may allow for seeing the sensors inside the human body using MRI because the iron-oxide particle is a very good imaging… read more

close and return to Home