Most Recently Added Most commentedBy Title | A-Z

A semiconductor DNA sequencer

July 22, 2011

Ion Torrent

Startup Ion Torrent has launched its new semiconductor-based sequencing machine — at $50,000, a comparatively inexpensive device.

Most advanced sequencing technologies rely on fluorescently tagged molecules and a microscope to sequence DNA. At the heart of Ion Torrent’s machine are sequencing chips that detect DNA sequences electronically.

This approach removes the need for expensive lasers and cameras. The chips are made in the same semiconductor fabs as computer… read more

A Sharper Future for Retinal Implants

February 2, 2011

hippocampalneuralcells

Research at the Italian Institute of Technology suggests a way to make higher-quality, more biocompatible retinal implants by integrating living neural cells with a soft organic polymer semiconductor. It could lead to a retinal implant that produces much clearer vision.

The researchers grew neural cells in a petri dish directly on top of the polymer. Light shined on the polymer activates the photodiodes, which stimulate individual neurons… read more

A Shift in the Debate Over Global Warming

April 6, 2008

With recent data showing an unexpected rise in global emissions and a decline in energy efficiency, a growing chorus of economists, scientists and students of energy policy are saying that whatever benefits a cap on greenhouse gas emissions yields, it will be too little and come too late.

A Shortcut Through Time: The Path to the Quantum Computer

June 9, 2003

A Shortcut Through Time: The Path to the Quantum Computer by George Johnson (Knopf, 2003) aims to explain how a quantum computer would work to nonspecialists.

The book uses “clocks, tops, and waves to explain a Tinkertoy version of quantum computing that quickly gets the reader involved and hungry to learn more,” according to a review in the June 6 Science.

“The science in the book is fairly… read more

A Silver Coating in the Fight Against Microbes

May 5, 2008

City College of New York researchers have developed paint containing silver nanoparticles, which can kill bacteria and other microbes, and are recommending that hospitals paint their walls and countertops to fight infection.

Bacteria cannot build up resistance to silver nanoparticles as they can to antibiotics, because the nanoparticles destroy the physical structure of cells.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than one… read more

A Simple Plan

May 2, 2001

The Simputer (Simple Inexpensive Mobile Computer), a computer priced and designed for the billions of people without access to computers, has been developed by India-based Simputer Trust.

The prototype features Intel chip, 32 MB of RAM, 16 MB of flash memory, Linux OS, multilingual text-to-speech, picture-based touch-sensitive screen, Palm-like grafitti writing and Internet access via phone line, with a target retail price of $200.

A simple way to cloak objects at microwave frequencies to improve transmission

October 8, 2012

sylinteri

A metal object can be made invisible to to electromagnetic radiation at microwave frequencies by approximately 70 per cent with the help of ordinary plastic, Aalto University researchers have shown.

In practical terms, this means that electromagnetic waves travelling, for example, between two antennas, do not detect an object located in their path, allowing the waves to travel the distance between them despite the obstacle, without any disruption… read more

A simple, non-invasive gene therapy restores sight

Can now safely insert repair genes into photoreceptors in the fine-vision fovea
June 14, 2013

intravitreal_injection2

UC Berkeley researchers have developed an new method for inserting genes into retina cells that is easier and more effective, It could greatly expand gene therapy to help restore sight to patients with blinding diseases ranging from inherited defects like retinitis pigmentosa to degenerative illnesses of old age, such as macular degeneration.

Unlike current treatments, the new procedure delivers genes to hard-to-reach cells throughout the entire retina,… read more

A Simpler, Gentler Robotic Grip

September 28, 2009

(Leif Jentoft)

A simple, soft robotic hand that can grab a range of objects delicately and automatically adjust its fingers to get a good grip has been developed by researchers from Harvard and Yale Universities, and might also be useful as a prosthetic arm.

A simplified graphical approach to machine learning

November 14, 2013

graph_theory

An algorithm that extends an artificial-intelligence technique to new tasks could aid in analysis of flight delays and social networks.

Much artificial-intelligence research is concerned with finding statistical correlations between variables: What combinations of visible features indicate the presence of a particular object in a digital image? What speech sounds correspond with instances of what words? What medical, genetic, and environmental factors are correlated with what diseases?

As… read more

A Single-Photon Server with Just One Atom

March 19, 2007

A team of physicists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics has built a single-photon server based on a single trapped neutral atom.

The high quality of the single photons and their ready availability are important for future quantum information processing experiments with single photons.

A Single-Protein Wet Biotransistor

April 8, 2005

A single-protein wet biotransistor has been devised by physicists. It uses a bacterial protein called azurin in a strategic position between two gold electrodes, which act as the source and drain of a transistor. A third electrode, acting as the gate, enables the centrally located azurin to allow the passage of an electrical current

A six-sigma signal of superluminal neutrinos from OPERA

September 23, 2011

A measurement has been performed on the time that muon neutrinos take to travel from their production point at CERN to the Opera detector, finding that neutrinos take a handful of nanoseconds less than if they were traveling at light speed, experimental particle physicist (CERN and Fermilab) and blogger Tommaso Dorigo reports.

Neutrinos seen by the Opera detector are produced when a high-intensity spill of protons from… read more

A Sixth Sense for a Wired World

June 12, 2006

What if, seconds before your laptop began stalling, you could feel the hard drive spin up under the load? Or you could tell if an electrical cord was live before you touched it?

For the few people who have rare earth magnets implanted in their fingers, these are among the reported effects — a finger that feels omagnetic fields along with the normal sense of touch.

A small step toward seeing habitable planets

March 10, 2014

beta_Pic_VisAO_v3

University of Arizona researchers have snapped images of a planet outside our solar system with an Earth-based telescope using a CCD imaging sensor, which is also found in digital cameras, instead of an thermal infrared detector.

“This is an important next step in the search for exoplanets because imaging in visible light instead of thermal infrared is what we likely have to do if we want to… read more

close and return to Home