Most Recently Added Most commentedBy Title | A-Z

Doping glass to function like a transistor could lead to super-fast computers

November 11, 2014

Optical fibers (credit: Wikimedia Commons)

British researchers have developed a new glass material that could allow computers to transfer information via light, significantly increasing computer processing speeds and power in the future.

The research by the University of Surrey, in collaboration with the University of Cambridge and the University of Southampton, has found it is possible to change the electronic properties of amorphous chalcogenides.

This is a glass material used in… read more

Superintelligence: Bostrom at Berkeley

November 10, 2014

(Credit: C-SPAN)

A video has been posted by Book TV of a talk by Nick Bostrom, a professor, Oxford University, about his book, Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies, where he posits a future in which machines are more intelligent than humans and questions whether intelligent machines will try to save or destroy us.

He spoke at an event at University of California, Berkeley, hosted by the Machineread more

Beyond Interstellar: new visualizations of the event horizon of black holes

November 10, 2014

Visualization of computer model of plasma around a black hole (credit: UA)

University of Arizona (UA) astrophysicists are taking the special effects in the movie Interstellar a step further, generating what happens when matter flowing into a black hole crosses the event horizon, the point of no return, and then disappears.

To do that, the astrophysicists are using UA’s new supercomputer — nicknamed El Gato — combining knowledge from mathematical equations and astronomical observations to generate visualizations of an… read more

Novel process could let consumers 3D-print metal parts for the first time

November 9, 2014

CAD model of a crescent wrench (left) and the resulting printed part (right) (credit: Torabi Payman et al./3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing)

A novel 3D printing process called Selective Inhibition Sintering (SIS) promises to allow manufacturing of consumer 3D printers* that can print parts made of high-performance metals, which high-cost industrial 3D printers can already do.

The new process, developed at the Center for Rapid Automated Fabrication Technologies at USC, is based on existing low-cost inkjet printing technology. It differs from traditional research in powder sintering* (a process of… read more

How to store solar energy more cost-effectively for use at night

November 7, 2014

Graphic shows how electrolysis could produce hydrogen as a way to store renewable energy. During the day, solar panels supply surplus electricity for electrolysis, producing hydrogen. At night, hydrogen would be combined with oxygen from the air to generate electricity. (Credit: Jakob Kibsgaard)

There’s currently no cost-effective, large-scale way to store solar energy, but Stanford researchers have developed a solution: using electrolysis to turn tanks of water and hydrogen into batteries. During the day, electricity from solar cells could be used to break apart water into hydrogen and oxygen. Recombining these gases would generate electricity for use at night.

There’s one major problem. Electrolysis uses electricity to crack the chemical bonds that… read more

Astronomers capture best image ever of planet formation

November 7, 2014

ALMA image of the young star HL Tau and its protoplanetary disk. This best image ever of planet formation reveals multiple rings and gaps that herald the presence of emerging planets as they sweep their orbits clear of dust and gas. (Credit: ALMA (NRAO/ESO/NAOJ); C. Brogan, B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF))

Astronomers have captured the best image ever of planet formation around an infant star, using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array’s (ALMA) new high-resolution capabilities.

The image reveals in astonishing detail the planet-forming disk surrounding HL Tau, a Sun-like star located approximately 450 light-years from Earth in the constellation Taurus.

The astronomers say ALMA uncovered never-before-seen features in this system, including multiple concentric rings separated by clearly defined gaps.… read more

High-fat diet postpones brain aging in mice

November 6, 2014

Kerala coconuts (credit: Dan Iserman CC)

A new Danish-led research suggests that signs of brain aging can be postponed in mice if they are placed on a high-fat diet. The finding may one day allow for developing treatments for children suffering from premature aging and patients with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

The new research project, headed by the Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, and the National Institute of Health, studied mice having… read more

Brain-to-brain interface via Internet replicated, improved

November 6, 2014

The sender (left) is hooked to an electroencephalography machine that reads brain activity. A computer processes the brain signals and sends electrical pulses via the Web to the receiver (right) across campus.A transcranial magnetic stimulation coil is placed over the part of the brain that controls the receiver’s right hand movements.(Credit: Mary Levin, U of Wash.)

University of Washington researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team’s initial demonstration a year ago, reported on KurzweilAI.

In the newly published study, which involved six people (instead of two), researchers were able to transmit the signals from one person’s brain over the Internet and use these signals to control the hand motions of… read more

‘Direct writing’ nanodiamond patterns from graphite

November 6, 2014

This illustration depicts a new technique that uses a pulsing laser to create synthetic nanodiamond films and patterns from graphite, with potential applications from biosensors to computer chips. (Credit: Purdue University/Gary Cheng)

Purdue University researchers have developed a method to instantly create synthetic nanodiamond films and patterns from graphite using a pulsing laser, with potential applications from biosensors to computer chips.

“The biggest advantage is that you can selectively deposit nanodiamond on rigid surfaces without the high temperatures and pressures normally needed to produce synthetic diamond,” said Gary Cheng, an associate professor of industrial engineering at .

“We do… read more

Tough multifunctional electronics based on bullet-proof Kevlar

November 5, 2014

Tungsten-coated Kevlar with a Kevlar (uncoated) background (Credit: S.Atanasov/NCSU)

North Carolina State University researchers have “woven” high-strength, highly conductive yarns made of tungsten metal on Kevlar — aka body armor material — by using atomic layer deposition (ALD), a process commonly used for producing memory and logic devices.

The tungsten-on-Kevlar yarns are expected to find applications in multifunctional protective electronics materials for electromagnetic shielding and communications, as well as erosion-resistant antistatic fabrics for space and automated… read more

Ebola, Marburg viruses edit genetic material during infection

November 5, 2014

Ebola virus virion (credit: CDC)

Filoviruses like Ebola “edit” genetic material as they invade their hosts, according to a study published this week in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

The work, by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the Galveston National Laboratory, and the J. Craig Venter Institute, could lead to a better understanding of these viruses, paving the way for new… read more

Spaceship Two crash raises concerns about commercial human space flight, former NASA historian says

November 5, 2014

Spaceship Two feathered (credit: Virgin Galactic)

The crash of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShip Two raises serious concerns about the future of commercial human spaceflight, including the imperatives of time and money that beset all who try to fly humans in space with existing technology,” according to a statement by Alex Roland, professor emeritus of history at Duke University and former NASA historian.

“Richard Branson has been famously secretive about the finances of Virgin… read more

How to create metamaterials that work in all directions

November 4, 2014

isotropic metamaterials ft.

A (relatively) large infrared metamaterial, up to 4 mm x 4 square mm in size, that is essentially isotropic (works in all directions) has been developed by a team of scientists from RIKEN in Japan and NARLabs in Taiwan, using a type of metamaterial element called a split-ring resonator (SRR).

Metamaterials developed so far have been two-dimensional and inherently anisotropic, meaning that they are designed to act… read more

‘Quantum holograms’ for information storage and computation

November 4, 2014

Set up of the experiment showing the orthogonal side illumination (Credit: Vetlugin et al.)

Russian scientists have developed a theoretical model for quantum information storage using holograms.

These findings from Anton Vetlugin and Ivan Sokolov from St. Petersburg State University in Russia are published in a study in The European Physical Journal D.

The authors demonstrate that it is theoretically possible to retrieve, on demand, a given portion of the stored quantized light signal of a holographic image by shaping the control… read more

Studies link meditation, support, and Tai Chi practices with healing for breast-cancer survivors

November 4, 2014

Tai Chi (credit: Anita Ritenour, CC)

Two recent studies suggest that meditation, support groups, and Tai Chi are associated with healing for breast cancer survivors.

Canadian researchers found that practicing mindfulness meditation or being involved in a support group has “a positive physical impact” at the cellular level in breast cancer survivors.

The researchers, at Alberta Health Services’ Tom Baker Cancer Centre and the University of Calgary Department of Oncology,… read more

close and return to Home