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Superintelligence reading group

September 4, 2014

superintelligence

Nick Bostrom’s eagerly awaited Superintelligence is due to be published in the U.S. this week, and MIRI will be running an online reading group where you can join with others to ask questions, discuss ideas, and probe the arguments more deeply, according to MIRI research assistant Katja Grace.

As Oxford University Press notes, “Superintelligence asks the questions: What happens when machines surpass humans in general intelligence? Will artificial… read more

Calico and AbbVie announce R&D collaboration

Plan R&D facility in S.F. Bay Area, may co-invest up to $1.5 billion to tackle age-related diseases
September 3, 2014

(Credit: Calico)

 

(Credit: Calico)

Calico and drug company AbbVie announced today a novel R&D collaboration intended to “help the two companies discover, develop, and bring to market new therapies for patients with age-related diseases, including for neurodegeneration and cancer.”

Calico is the Google-backed life sciences company that is led by Arthur D. Levinson Ph.D. (former chairman and CEO of Genentech)… read more

Samsung introduces mobile quad-HD VR device

September 3, 2014

Samsung Gear VR (credit: Samsung)

Samsung introduced today Gear VR Innovator Edition, billed as “the first widely available mobile VR headset.”

It uses Oculus VR technology combined with Samsung’s 5.7 inch Quad HD (2560 x 1440 pixel) Galaxy Note 4 mobile phone — “an early-access, beta-version of the device for developers and enthusiasts rather than a final consumer product,” according to the Oculus VR blog.

Here’s how Samsung describes… read more

Google partners with UC Santa Barbara team to build new superconductor-based quantum information processors

September 3, 2014

Martinis Group's superconducting five-qubit array (credit: Erik Lucero)

Hartmut Neven, Director of Engineering for the Quantum Artificial Intelligence team at Google said the team is launching a hardware initiative to design and build new quantum information processors based on superconducting electronics.

John Martinis and his team at UC Santa Barbara will join Google in this initiative. Martinis and his group have been building superconducting quantum electronic components of very highread more

‘Butterfly’ molecule could lead to new sensors, photoenergy conversion devices

September 2, 2014

A phosphorescent molecular “butterfly” that can generate dual (white) emission upon<br />
photoexcitation (credit: M. Han et al./Angewandte Chemie)

A novel molecule that can take your temperature, emit white light, and convert photon energy directly to mechanical motions has been enhanced by Florida State University researchers.

Biwu Ma, associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering in the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, created the molecular structure resembling a butterfly in a lab about a decade ago, but has… read more

Tea trumps coffee for non-cardivascular mortality

September 2, 2014

greentea

Drinking tea is associated with 24% reduced non-cardiovascular mortality, reveals a study of 131,000 people presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress by Professor Nicolas Danchin from France.

The study included 131,401 people aged 18 to 95 years who had a health check up at the Paris IPC Preventive Medicine Center between January 2001 and December 2008. During a mean 3–5 years follow-up,… read more

A batteryless cardiac pacemaker based on self-winding wristwatch

September 2, 2014

The energy harvesting device is sutured directly onto the myocardium (credit: European Society of Cardiology)

A new batteryless cardiac pacemaker controlled by a self-winding wristwatch mechanism that is powered by heart motion has been developed by researchers in the Cardiovascular Engineering Group at ARTORG, University of Bern, Switzerland.

The device was presented at European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2014 by Adrian Zurbuchen a PhD candidate.

“Batteries are a limiting factor in today’s… read more

A multifunctional medical nanoparticle

September 2, 2014

multitasking nanoparticles-ft

Researchers at UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center and other institutions have created biocompatible multitasking nanoparticles that could be used as contrast agents to light up tumors for MRI and PET scans or deliver chemo and other therapies to destroy tumors. The study was published online in Nature Communications.

“These are amazingly useful particles,” noted co-first author Yuanpei Li, a research faculty member in the Lam laboratory. “As… read more

DARPA explores neuromodulation of organ functions to help the human body heal itself

September 2, 2014

ElectRx-ft

DARPA’s new Electrical Prescriptions (ElectRx)  (pronounced “electrics”) program aims to develop new high-precision, minimally invasive technologies for modulating nerve circuits to restore and maintain human health, initiated in support of the President’s brain initiative.

“The technology DARPA plans to develop through the ElectRx program could fundamentally change the manner in which doctors diagnose, monitor and treat injury and illness,” said Doug Weber, DARPA program manager. “Instead of relying only… read more

Children with autism learn imitative behavior from socially assistive robot

August 29, 2014

copycat-game

Humanoid robots could help autistic children practice imitation behavior, according to USC Viterbi School of Engineering researchers, based on a new study.

They examined how children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) react to humanoid robots that provide “graded cueing” — an occupational therapy technique that shapes behavior by providing increasingly specific cues, or prompts, to help a person learn new or lost skills.

An imitation gameread more

Improving memory with transcranial magnetic stimulation

August 29, 2014

Using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to indirectly stimulate the hippocampus (credit: Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)

Northwestern Medicine researchers have discovered that using high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to indirectly stimulate the hippocampus portion of the brain (which is involved in forming memories) improves long-term memory.

The discovery opens up interesting new possibilities for treating memory impairments caused by conditions such as stroke, early-stage Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury, and cardiac arrest — along with the memory problems… read more

Atoms to product: aiming to make nanoscale benefits life-sized

August 28, 2014

Assembly Gap

DARPA has created the Atoms to Product (A2P) program to develop enhanced technologies for assembling atomic-scale components and integrate them into materials and systems from nanoscale up to product scale — in ways that preserve and exploit distinctive nanoscale properties.

The new program also seeks to develop revolutionary miniaturization and assembly methods that would work at scales 100,000 times smaller than current state-of-the-art technology.

Many common… read more

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules

August 28, 2014

Innate immune cell distribution in regenerating bladder tissue. Elevated levels of CD68+ macrophages (green) and MPO+ neutrophils (red). (Credit: Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute)

The research group of Arun K. Sharma*, PhD has developed a system for patients with urinary bladder dysfunction that may protect them against an inflammatory reaction** resulting from tissue regeneration, which can negatively impact tissue growth, development and function.

The researchers treated a highly pro-inflammatory biologic scaffold with anti-inflammatory peptide amphiphiles (AIF-PAs). (Self-assembling peptide amphiphiles, or PAs, are biocompatible and biodegradable nanomaterials used in a wide range of… read more

Sorting out circulating tumor cells in the blood with sound waves

Could help assess cancer’s spread
August 28, 2014

sorting out

A research team has developed a device that could be used to detect the extremely rare tumor cells that circulate in cancer patients’ blood, helping doctors predict whether a tumor is going to spread.

Developed by researchers from MIT, Pennsylvania State University, and Carnegie Mellon University, the dime-sized device separates out tumor cells from white blood cells by exposing the cells to sound… read more

Helping researchers cope with the medical literature knowledge explosion

IBM Watson, other tools to provide automated reasoning and hypothesis generation from the complete medical literature
August 27, 2014

(Credit: IBM)

Computational biologists at Baylor College of Medicine and analytics experts at IBM research are developing a powerful new tool called the Knowledge Integration Toolkit (KnIT) that promises to help research scientists deal with the more than 50 million scientific papers available in public databases — with a new one publishing nearly every 30 seconds.

The goal: allow researchers pursuing new scientific studies to mine all available medical… read more

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