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A ‘Wikipedia’ for neurons

March 31, 2015

neuron types

Carnegie Mellon University | NeuroElectro.org description

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have used data mining to create neuroelectro.org, a publicly available website that acts like Wikipedia, indexing the decades worth of physiological data collected about the billions of neurons in the brain.

The site aims to help accelerate the advance of neuroscience research by providing a centralized resource for collecting and comparing this “brain big… read more

A Wikipedia for robots

Allows robots to share knowledge and experience in caring for elders worldwide using a central online database
January 23, 2014

(Credit: TU/e)

European scientists from six institutes and two universities have developed an online platform where robots can learn new skills from each other worldwide — a kind of “Wikipedia for robots.”

The objective is to help develop robots better at helping elders with caring and household tasks.

“The problem right now is that robots are often developed specifically for one task”, says René van de Molengraft, TU/e researcher and… read more

A Window That Washes Itself? New Nano-Material May Revolutionize Solar Panels and Batteries, Too

December 4, 2009

091203132159

A novel way to control the atoms and molecules of peptides so that they “grow” to resemble small forests of grass that repel dust and water — a perfect self-cleaning coating for windows or solar panels — and more efficient batteries has been developed by Tel Aviv University researchers.

A wireless low-power, high-quality EEG headset

October 10, 2012

EEG-imec

Imec, Holst Centre and Panasonic have developed a new prototype of a wireless EEG (electroencephalogram, or brain waves) headset designed to be a reliable, high-quality and wearable EEG monitoring system.
The system combines ease-of-use with ultra-low power electronics. Continuous impedance monitoring and the use of active electrodes increases the quality of EEG signal recording compared to former versions of the system.
How it works

The EEG… read more

A Wirelessly Powered Lightbulb

June 8, 2007

Researchers at MIT have shown that it’s possible to wirelessly power a 60-watt lightbulb sitting about two meters away from a power source.

Using a remarkably simple setup–basically consisting of two metal coils using resonant coupling–they have demonstrated, for the first time, that it is feasible to efficiently send that much power over such a distance. The experiment paves the way for wirelessly charging batteries in laptops, mobile phones,… read more

A Wiring Diagram of the Brain

November 20, 2007
Scientists are developing new ways to study the tangled web of neurons in the brain. (Kevin Briggman, Moritz Helmstaedter, Winfried Denk Viren Jain, Joseph Murray, Srini Turaga, and Sebastian Seung)

New technologies that allow scientists to trace the fine wiring of the brain more accurately than ever before could soon generate a complete wiring diagram–including every tiny fiber and miniscule connection–of a piece of brain.

Dubbed connectomics, these maps could uncover how neural networks perform their precise functions in the brain, and they could shed light on disorders thought to originate from faulty wiring, such as autism… read more

A Working Brain Model

November 28, 2007

Scientists in Switzerland working with IBM researchers have shown that their computer simulation of the neocortical column, arguably the most complex part of a mammal’s brain, appears to behave like its biological counterpart.

By demonstrating that their simulation is realistic, the researchers say, these results suggest that an entire mammal brain could be completely modeled within three years, and a human brain within the next decade.

A World at Your Fingertips

May 29, 2002

The Worldview project plans to open real-time windows around the world. Bringing together Japanese “puri-kura” photo booths, webcams and the holiday snapshot, the project will establish installations at landmark locations around the world, using city skylines as the common backdrop.

“It would allow ordinary people in different countries to interact, perhaps for the first time,” says Usman Haque, who, along with Josephine Pletts, designed the device. “It can create… read more

A world record for highest-surface-area materials

Greatly expands storage density for natural gas (for vehicles), light harvesting, and drug delivery
September 13, 2012

NU-110

Northwestern University researchers have broken a world record by creating two new synthetic materials with the greatest amount of surface areas reported to date.

Named NU-109 and NU-110, the materials belong to a class of crystalline nanostructure known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) that are promising vessels for natural-gas and hydrogen storage for vehicles, and for catalysts, chemical sensing, light harvesting, drug delivery, and other uses requiring a large… read more

A world without trucks

March 7, 2008

Some Western European countries are getting serious about transporting consumer goods through automated subterranean networks.

This rare combination of low-tech sense and high-tech knowledge could lead to a further economic growth without destroying the environment and the quality of life.

These concepts offer exciting possibilities. Goods can be transported from factories to stores, from factories to factories or even from stores to consumers — in the long run,… read more

A wrinkle in space-time

July 20, 2012

Shock wave around supernova 1987A captured by the Hubble Space Telescope (credit: NASA, ESA, K. France (University of Colordo, Boulder), P. Challis and R. Kirshner (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)/Wikimedia Commons)

Mathematicians at UC Davis have come up with a new way to crinkle up the fabric of space-time — at least in theory.

“We show that space-time cannot be locally flat at a point where two shock waves collide,” said Blake Temple, professor of mathematics at UC Davis. “This is a new kind of singularity in general relativity.”

Background

Einstein’s theory… read more

A wristband to track health, fight obesity

July 16, 2011

Jawbone-Wristband

Jawbone‘s Up, combining a sensor-infused wristband and iPhone app, will provide “nudges” for healthier living, based on your behavior.

The wristband’s sensors collect data about how much you’ve been sleeping and moving and send it to an app. You enter meal data manually, in part by taking pictures of what you’ve eaten.

Based on that information, the app provides nudges meant to help you… read more

A year in the quantum world

December 26, 2008

Four radical routes to a theory of everything, The great antimatter mystery, Anyons: the breakthrough quantum computing needs?, and Matter is merely vacuum fluctuations are among the year’s top 10 in-depth articles about the quantum world.

A zoomable 360-degree view of our galaxy

March 25, 2014

Milky-Way---featured

NASA’s new zoomable, 360-degree mosaic,  presented Thursday at the TED 2014 Conference in Vancouver, allows for exploring the Milky Way interactively.

The panorama of our galaxy is constructed from more than 2 million infrared snapshots taken over the past 10 years by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope.

The 20-gigapixel mosaic uses Microsoft’s WorldWide Telescope visualization platform. It captures about three percent of our sky, but because it… read more

A ‘Google map’ of human metabolism

March 6, 2013

Human Metabolism-excerpt

An international consortium of university researchers has produced the most comprehensive virtual reconstruction of human metabolism to date.

Scientists could use the model, known as Recon 2, to identify causes of and new treatments for diseases like cancer, diabetes and even psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Each person’s metabolism, which represents the conversion of food sources into energy and the assembly of molecules,… read more

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