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A wearable to help measure stress, epileptic seizures, activity, and sleep

November 24, 2014

Embrace (credit: Empatica)

MIT spinoff Empatica, which is developing a medical-quality wearable device to monitor epileptic seizures* and alert caregivers, has launched an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign to fund its development.

“When people that have epilepsy wear Embrace, they will get an alert when an unusual event happens, like a convulsive seizure,” the Indiegogo site says. “It will go via their smartphone to parents, roommates or caregivers, so somebody can check… read more

A wearable, 3D-printable temperature sensor

February 23, 2015

Fever Alarm Armband2

University of Tokyo researchers have developed a “fever alarm armband,” a flexible, self-powered wearable device that sounds an alarm in case of high body temperature.

The flexible organic components developed for this device are well-suited to wearable devices that continuously monitor vital signs including temperature and heart rate for applications in healthcare settings.

The new device combines a flexible amorphous silicon solar panel, piezoelectric speaker, temperature… read more

A Web of Sensors, Taking Earth’s Pulse

May 11, 2005

The rapid miniaturization of technologies behind cameras, cellphones and wireless computers is allowing scientists to build innovative networks of small sensors that they say will produce a new era of ecological insight and, in time, help save the planet.

A Web That Thinks Like You

July 5, 2007

Radar Networks plans later this year to launch Radar, which uses semantic Web technologies to help individuals and communities mine and share information from Internet sites, blogs, and social media services.

Built-in artificial intelligence will continually learn as people use the service and computers troll for similar information.

A Wheelchair That Reads Your Mind

January 30, 2007

Researchers are developing a thought-controlled robotic wheelchair, using a small, mobile interface that works with EEG electrodes placed on the scalp.

A Whisper, Perhaps, From the Universe’s Dark Side

November 25, 2008

A concatenation of puzzling results from satellites and experiments has led a growing number of astronomers and physicists to suspect that they are getting signals from a shadow universe of dark matter that makes up a quarter of creation but has eluded direct detection until now.

A whiteboard of the future

May 1, 2015

Handwriting with a magnet-ft

Researchers from the University of Tokyo have developed an inexpensive handwriting-enabled e-paper suited to large displays like whiteboards.

The display is made from black-and-white microparticles about 0.1 millimeter in diameter. One hemisphere of each particle is black and carries a negative charge, while the other is white and carries a positive charge. The particles are sandwiched between two electrodes. By switching the direction of the voltage across the electrodes… read more

A Wii warm-up hones surgical skills

January 21, 2008

Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center researchers have found that surgical residents performed better during simulated surgery after playing on the Wii console.

They put it down to the console’s novel “Wiimote” control system, which allows players to direct on-screen action using a wireless wand that detects acceleration in three dimensions.

Now they are designing Wii software that will accurately simulate surgical procedures.

A ‘Wikipedia’ for neurons

March 31, 2015

neuron types

Carnegie Mellon University | NeuroElectro.org description

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have used data mining to create neuroelectro.org, a publicly available website that acts like Wikipedia, indexing the decades worth of physiological data collected about the billions of neurons in the brain.

The site aims to help accelerate the advance of neuroscience research by providing a centralized resource for collecting and comparing this “brain big… read more

A Wikipedia for robots

Allows robots to share knowledge and experience in caring for elders worldwide using a central online database
January 23, 2014

(Credit: TU/e)

European scientists from six institutes and two universities have developed an online platform where robots can learn new skills from each other worldwide — a kind of “Wikipedia for robots.”

The objective is to help develop robots better at helping elders with caring and household tasks.

“The problem right now is that robots are often developed specifically for one task”, says René van de Molengraft, TU/e researcher and… read more

A Window That Washes Itself? New Nano-Material May Revolutionize Solar Panels and Batteries, Too

December 4, 2009

091203132159

A novel way to control the atoms and molecules of peptides so that they “grow” to resemble small forests of grass that repel dust and water — a perfect self-cleaning coating for windows or solar panels — and more efficient batteries has been developed by Tel Aviv University researchers.

A wireless low-power, high-quality EEG headset

October 10, 2012

EEG-imec

Imec, Holst Centre and Panasonic have developed a new prototype of a wireless EEG (electroencephalogram, or brain waves) headset designed to be a reliable, high-quality and wearable EEG monitoring system.
The system combines ease-of-use with ultra-low power electronics. Continuous impedance monitoring and the use of active electrodes increases the quality of EEG signal recording compared to former versions of the system.
How it works

The EEG… read more

A Wirelessly Powered Lightbulb

June 8, 2007

Researchers at MIT have shown that it’s possible to wirelessly power a 60-watt lightbulb sitting about two meters away from a power source.

Using a remarkably simple setup–basically consisting of two metal coils using resonant coupling–they have demonstrated, for the first time, that it is feasible to efficiently send that much power over such a distance. The experiment paves the way for wirelessly charging batteries in laptops, mobile phones,… read more

A Wiring Diagram of the Brain

November 20, 2007
Scientists are developing new ways to study the tangled web of neurons in the brain. (Kevin Briggman, Moritz Helmstaedter, Winfried Denk Viren Jain, Joseph Murray, Srini Turaga, and Sebastian Seung)

New technologies that allow scientists to trace the fine wiring of the brain more accurately than ever before could soon generate a complete wiring diagram–including every tiny fiber and miniscule connection–of a piece of brain.

Dubbed connectomics, these maps could uncover how neural networks perform their precise functions in the brain, and they could shed light on disorders thought to originate from faulty wiring, such as autism… read more

A Working Brain Model

November 28, 2007

Scientists in Switzerland working with IBM researchers have shown that their computer simulation of the neocortical column, arguably the most complex part of a mammal’s brain, appears to behave like its biological counterpart.

By demonstrating that their simulation is realistic, the researchers say, these results suggest that an entire mammal brain could be completely modeled within three years, and a human brain within the next decade.

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