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How exercise affects the brain

May 21, 2012

Jogging_young_female

Exercise clears the mind. It gets the blood pumping and more oxygen is delivered to the brain. But Dartmouth’s David Bucci thinks there is much more going on.

“In the last several years there have been data suggesting that neurobiological changes are happening — [there are] very brain-specific mechanisms at work here,” says Bucci, an associate professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

From his… read more

Laser beam guides lightning bolts to a ground target

U.S. Army develops Zeus-like weapon
June 28, 2012

guided_lightning_bolt

Scientists and engineers at the U.S Army’s Picatinny Arsenal are developing a device that can shoot lightning bolts down laser beams to destroy its target.

The Laser-Induced Plasma Channel (LIPC) is designed to take out targets that conduct electricity better than the air or ground that surrounds them.

“Light travels more slowly in gases and solids than it does in a vacuum,” explained George Fischer,… read more

A machine that trains you to feel affection

May 27, 2014

Distributed voxel patterns that best distinguished between tenderness/affection vs. pride within the neurofeedback group, measured across all fMRI sessions. The color range shows voxels present in at least 40% (blue) or above 66% (red-yellow) of the subjects. (Credit: Jorge Moll et al./PLOS ONE)

It’s possible to create brain patterns associated with affection or tenderness toward loved ones, using neurofeedback while being scanned in a functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) machine, researchers at D’Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR) in Brazil have shown.

The finding, described in PLOS ONE (open access), could open up new possibilities for treatment of conditions such as antisocial personality disorder, the researchers suggest.

An empathyread more

Noninvasive retinal imaging device detects Alzheimer’s 20 years in advance

Device could be FDA-approved by 2015 and early signs of Alzheimer's could be detected in a regular ophthalmologist exam
July 22, 2014

Retina test for Alzheimers - feat

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center researchers have developed a noninvasive retinal imaging device that can provide early detection of changes indicating Alzheimer’s disease 15 to 20 years before clinical diagnosis.

“In preliminary results in 40 patients, the test could differentiate between Alzheimer’s disease and non-Alzheimer’s disease with 100 percent sensitivity and 80.6 percent specificity, meaning that all people with the disease tested positive and most of the people without… read more

Creating a deep-sea Internet

October 17, 2013

internet_underwater_1

University at Buffalo researchers are developing a deep-sea Internet that could lead to improvements in tsunami detection, offshore oil and natural gas exploration, surveillance, pollution monitoring, and other activities.

“A submerged wireless network will give us an unprecedented ability to collect and analyze data from our oceans in real time,” said Tommaso Melodia, UB associate professor of electrical engineering and the project’s lead researcher.… read more

World’s first solar-powered country

August 3, 2012

3newstokelau

A $7.3 million project to convert the tiny island nation of Tokelau to all solar power is nearing completion.

Once activated, the installations should provide more than 90 percent of the power used by the islands’ 1,711 residents, MSN Future of Tech reports.

Tokelau is a remote nation northeast of New Zealand comprising three atolls, to which goods and passengers can only travel by boat. Their… read more

Golden Spike aims to return humans to the Moon

December 7, 2012

golden_spike_lander

The Golden Spike Company, the first company planning to offer routine exploration expeditions to the surface of the Moon — by the end of this decade — was  unveiled Thursday by former Apollo Flight Director and NASA Johnson Space Center Director Gerry Griffin, Golden Spike’s chairman, and planetary scientist and former NASA science chief Dr. Alan Stern, President and CEO.

The announcement was made on the… read more

Lightest Material in the World

July 26, 2012

Aerographite

“Aerographite” — a network of interwoven porous carbon microtubes — is the lightest material in the world, at  0.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter  (75 times lighter than Styrofoam), scientists of Kiel University (KU) and Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) claim.

Although lightweight, Aerographite is designed to be extremely robust to bear strong deformations. And despite its low density, it can be fabricated in various macroscopic shapes on the order of several cubic… read more

The state of the US election system

Gains in voting-machine technologies could be cancelled out by errors introduced through mail and Internet voting
October 19, 2012

(credit: Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project)

The good news: widespread technological upgrades have largely eliminated the voting-machine problems that were so evident when Florida’s disputed recount determined the 2000 presidential election.

The bad news: early voting through the mail, which is increasing, is turning out to be a relatively low-accuracy method of voting, according to a new open access research report released by MIT and the Californiaread more

MIT grad students achieve long-sought stable nanocrystalline metals

Method developed by MIT researchers could produce materials with exceptional strength and other properties
August 24, 2012

nanocristalline_alloys

MIT researchers have designed and made alloys that form extremely tiny grains — called nanocrystals — that are only a few nanometers across. These alloys retain their nanocrystalline structure even in the face of high heat. Such materials hold great promise for high-strength structural materials, among other potential uses.

Graduate student Tongjai Chookajorn, of MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE), guided the effort to design and… read more

The ultimate lifelogging interface?

"Wink, wink, nudge, nudge" --- Monty Python
May 4, 2013

wink

Developer Michael DiGiovanni has revealed on github a beta android app for Google Glass called “Winky” that takes a photo — replacing the wordy “”OK, Glass, take a picture.”

“Users will be able to lifelog with little to no effort. It allows more pictures to be taken easily and to become a timeline of where you have been,” says Roundarch Isobar, where DiGiovanni is Emerging… read more

Reducing caloric intake delays nerve cell loss

May 22, 2013

(Credit: iStockphoto)

Activating an enzyme known to play a role in the anti-aging benefits of calorie restriction delays the loss of brain cells and preserves cognitive function in mice, according to a study published in the May 22 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

The findings could one day guide researchers to discover drug alternatives that slow the progress of age-associated impairments in the brain.… read more

How to inkjet-print circuits at fraction of time and cost

November 8, 2013

A single-sided wiring pattern for an Arduino micro controller was printed on a transparent sheet of coated PET film.

A novel method to rapidly and cheaply 3D-print electrical circuits has been developed by researchers from Georgia Tech, the University of Tokyo, and Microsoft Research.

For about $300 in equipment costs, anyone can produce working electrical circuits in the 60 seconds it takes to print them using commodity inkjet printers and off-the-shelf materials.

Instant inkjet circuits

The technique, called instant inkjet circuits, allows for printing arbitrary-shaped conductors… read more

Is this the first map of dark matter?

April 9, 2014

gamma_ray_excess

A new study of gamma-ray light from the center of our galaxy makes the strongest case to date that some of this emission may arise from dark matter, an unknown substance making up most of the material universe. Using publicly available data from NASA‘s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, independent scientists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), the Massachusetts Institute of… read more

Nanoparticles against cellular aging

October 9, 2012

Intracellular controlled release of molecules within senescent cells was achieved using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) capped with a galacto-oligosaccharide (GOS) to contain the cargo molecules (magenta spheres; see scheme). The GOS is a substrate of the senescent biomarker, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), and releases the cargo upon entry into SA-β-gal expressing cells. (Credit: Alessandro Agostini et al./Angewandte Chemie)

A team of Spanish scientists has developed nanoparticles to selectively release therapeutic substances in aged human cells.

They are intended to treat diseases involving cellular degeneration of tissue, such as cancer, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, among other accelerated aging pathologies.

The mesoporous nanoparticles contain galactooligosaccharide (a chemical normally used in probiotics, which are pills to stimulate growth of healthy bacteria).

The next step of this research is… read more

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