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Unknown molecule opens the door to quantum computing

June 30, 2008

Purdue University researchers have have created a new hybrid molecule in which its quantum state can be intentionally manipulated. The discovery could allow for quantum computing in semiconductors in the future.

University to Investigate Fusion Study

March 8, 2006

Purdue University has opened an investigation into “extremely serious” concerns regarding the research of a professor who said he had produced nuclear fusion in a tabletop experiment.

The vibrations, they said, collapsed tiny gas bubbles in the liquid, heating them to millions of degrees, hot enough to initiate fusion. If true, the phenomenon, often called sonofusion or bubble fusion, could have far-reaching applications, including the generation of energy.… read more

University of Saskatchewan researchers discover cannabis ‘pharma factory’

July 17, 2012

hemp_cannabis_sativa

University of Saskatchewan researchers have discovered the chemical pathway that Cannabis sativa uses to create bioactive compounds called cannabinoids, paving the way for the development of marijuana varieties to produce pharmaceuticals or cannabinoid-free industrial hemp.

U of S adjunct professor of biology Jon Page explains that the pathway is an unusual one, involving a specialized version of one enzyme, called hexanoyl-CoA synthetase, and another enzyme,… read more

University Of Michigan Launches Ambitious Exploration Of Inner Space

February 26, 2003

University of Michigan researchers will attempt to capture never-before-seen views of the chemical activity inside living cells in real time and 3-D.

The team will be using synthetic nanoprobes small enough to fit inside a cell without interrupting its normal functions to measure the activity of crucial metal ions like zinc and copper as the cell works. Sophisticated statistical modeling programs will be used to interpret the data.… read more

University of Miami engineer designs stretchable electronics with a twist

January 26, 2009

Researchers at three universities have developed a new design for stretchable electronics that can be wrapped around complex shapes, without a reduction in electronic function.

Potential uses for the new design include electronic devices for eye cameras, smart surgical gloves, body parts, airplane wings, back planes for liquid crystal displays and biomedical devices.

University of Maryland completes most extensive full-face transplant to date

March 28, 2012

patient-after-surgery

The University of Maryland Medical Center has performed the most extensive full-face transplant completed to date, including teeth, both jaws, and tongue.

The face transplant, formally called a vascularized composite allograft (VCA), was part of a 72-hour marathon of transplant activity.

The face transplant team was led by Eduardo D. Rodriguez, M.D., D.D.S., associate professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School… read more

University of Denmark Scientists Develop Hydrogen Tablet

September 23, 2005

Scientists at the Technical University of Denmark have invented a technology which may be an important step towards the hydrogen economy: a hydrogen tablet that effectively stores hydrogen in an inexpensive and safe material in solid form: in ammonia absorbed efficiently in sea salt.

University develops dancing robot that can follow lead

July 20, 2003

A team at Tohoku University has developed a robot that can follow a human dancer’s lead.

The robot can predict the dancer’s next move through hand pressure applied to its arms and back, and also judging from dance steps it is making, and can then turn at the appropriate speed. Equipped with a computer, sensors and batteries, it can move in any direction on four wheels and has memory… read more

University Develops 12Tbyte Nano Memory

July 9, 2004

A memory technology that could squeeze almost 12Tbyte onto a CD-sized surface is under development, using 10nm crytals deposited on a substrate and switched by electron beam energy pulses.

Universities, research centers retrench after hacks

April 16, 2004

Academic supercomputing labs were targeted by unknown attackers over the last month, compromising servers at the San Diego Supercomputing Center, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Stanford University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and elsewhere.

While the attackers had access to many of the computers that act as nodes on distributed high-performance computing networks, the intruders were more interested in access to computing power than sabotage, laboratory staff maintain.

Universities will be ‘irrelevant’ by 2020

April 22, 2009

Universities will be irrelevant by 2020 in a world where students listen to free online lectures on iPods, course materials are shared between universities, science labs are virtual, and digital textbooks are free, says Brigham Young University professor of psychology and instructional technology David Wiley.

Universe’s dark matter mix is ‘just right’ for life

December 5, 2008

University of California, Berkeley scientist Ben Freivogel combined the cosmological models of large-scale structure formation with the physics of dark-matter axions to predict the most likely value for the ratio of dark matter to normal matter that would allow observers like us to emerge, assuming that the number of observers in a universe is proportional to the number of galaxies within it.

Supporting the antropic principle, his calculations show… read more

Universe mostly forgets its past during cosmic rebirth

July 3, 2007

A new study by Martin Bojowald, a theorist at the Pennsylvania State University, and colleagues suggests that with each big bang, the universe mostly forgets its past and starts anew.

The model showed that most, but not all, of the information about what came before the big bang gets irretrievably lost through the big bang transition. And in a perpetual cycle of big bangs and crunches, this information loss… read more

Universe Measured: We’re 156 Billion Light-years Wide!

May 25, 2004

The universe is at least 156 billion light-years wide.

The calculation is based on the calculations that the universe is about 13.7 billion years old. So one might assume that the diameter of the universe is 27.4 billion light-years wide. But the universe has been expanding ever since the beginning of time, bringing the estimated diameter to 156 billion light-years.

Universe has more entropy than thought

October 7, 2009

A new calculation of the entropy of the universe by Australian physicists indicates that the collective entropy of all the supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies is 10^104, about 100 times higher than previously calculated, suggesting that the universe is slightly further along on its gradual journey to heat death.

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