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Slowing the aging process using only antibiotics

May 27, 2013

Lightmatter_lab_mice

Why is it that within a homogeneous population of the same species, some individuals live three times as long as others?

EPFL researchers investigated this question and found the mechanism responsible for aging hidden deep within mitochondria.

The were able to dramatically slow aging down in worms by administering antibiotics to the young, achieving a lifespan extension of 60 percent.

Mitochondia: biological timekeepersread more

Slowly, Cancer Genes Tender Their Secrets

December 26, 2005

Scientists are now finding that untangling the genetics of cancer is not impossible and are basing new treatments on their findings.

The turning point came only recently: with microarrays, or gene chips that can be coated with all known human genes, scientists can now discover every gene that is active in a cancer cell and learn what portions of the genes are amplified or deleted.

With another method,… read more

Small epigenetic DNA modifications predict brain’s threat response

Stress may be passed down through generations, studies suggest
August 8, 2014

Threat-related amygdala reactivity associated with serotonin transporter epigenetic modification (credit: Yuliya S Nikolova/Nature Neuroscience)

The tiny addition of a chemical mark called called a methyl group atop a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person’s brain responds to threats, according to a new study by Duke University researchers.

The study results, published August 3 in Nature Neuroscience, go beyond genetics to help explain why some… read more

Small Matters

July 19, 2005

Nanotechnology could lead to the next arms race. Experts are debating how to prepare.

Small Molecule, Big Threat

November 27, 2006

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in health and disease, and tiny amounts can cause heart failure.

Genetically erasing the miRNA that prompted heart failure could prevent it, scientists speculate.

Small RNAs Make Big Splash

December 19, 2002

Recent discoveries indicate that a class of RNA molecules called small RNAs operate many of the cell’s controls. They can shut down genes or alter their levels of expression.

In some species, truncated RNA molecules literally shape genomes, carving out chunks to keep and discarding others. There are even hints that certain small RNAs might help chart a cell’s destiny by directing genes to turn on or off during… read more

Small science to be big in 2005: analysts

January 21, 2005

“Nanotechnology” will be a much more familiar word to everyone in 2005, not just scientists, say analysts.

In 2005, people will start noticing its mundane uses, like making car paint shinier, windows that clean themselves, and smaller and better mobile batteries.

Small Thoughts for a Global Grid

September 2, 2003

Dr. Richard E. Smalley, discoverer of nanoscale buckyballs, has become increasingly hopeful about the potential of new technologies based on hydrogen and renewable energy sources like wind and solar power.

He believes carbon nanotubes could be woven into long wires that would be more efficient conductors than copper yet far lighter, making it much cheaper to move solar and wind power to places it is needed.

Small Times launches micro-, nano-oriented website

April 30, 2001

smalltimes.com is a new web site “devoted entirely to the fast-growing industry that includes MEMS, microsystems and nanotechnologies.”

The publisher will also launch Small Times Magazine in September 2001.

Small word network

July 5, 2002

Word association can link just about any two common (root) words in the English language using an average of three steps (degrees of separation), says a team of scientists at Arizona State University.
The researchers think the network structure of a language probably has its origins in the nature of cognition and memory. Different concepts, such as “actor” and “universe,” are closely linked by a short series of semantic… read more

Small world networks key to memory

May 28, 2004

Working memory appears to be based on simple networks of “small world” (maximally connected) neurons in the prefrontal cortex that participate in self-sustaining bursts of electrical activity.

Northwestern University researchers have created a model of these networks, using simple neurons that when activated would activate their neighbours for a brief period: an activating pulse travelled through the network and then disappeared at the fringes. They then added shortcuts to… read more

Small worlds come into focus with new Sandia microscope

June 12, 2012

AC-Stem-sandia

Sandia’s new aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC-STEM) is 50 to 100 times better than what came before, both in resolution and the time it takes to analyze a sample.

The AC-STEM delivers electron beams accelerated at voltages from 80 kV to 200 kV, allowing researchers to study properties of structures at the nanoscale — crucial for materials scientists working on everything from microelectronics to nuclear weapons.
High-clarity… read more

Smaller Than a Pushpin, More Powerful Than a PC

February 7, 2005

IBM, Sony and Toshiba will announce details Monday of The Cell, a microprocessor chip with a theoretical peak performance of 256 gigaflops (billion mathematical operations per seccond).

The Cell promises to enhance video gaming and digital home entertainment as well as high-performance scientific and engineering systems.

Smaller thermal cameras with smaller pixels for warfighters

Compact five-micron-pixel LWIR camera demonstrated
April 22, 2013

(credit: DARPA)

DARPA researchers have demonstrated a new five-micron-pixel long-wave infrared (LWIR) camera that could make this class of camera smaller and less expensive. (A micron is a millionth of a meter.)

The military uses LWIR (also know as “far IR”) cameras as thermal imagers to detect humans at night. These cameras are usually mounted on vehicles as they are too large to be carried by a… read more

Smaller Version of the Solar System Is Discovered

February 15, 2008

Astronomers had found a miniature version of our own solar system 5,000 light-years across the galaxy — the first planetary system that really looks like our own, with outer giant planets and room for smaller inner planets.

The new discovery was made by a technique called microlensing: the gravity of the nearer star can bend and magnify the light from the more distant one, causing it to get much… read more

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