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Small RNAs Make Big Splash

December 19, 2002

Recent discoveries indicate that a class of RNA molecules called small RNAs operate many of the cell’s controls. They can shut down genes or alter their levels of expression.

In some species, truncated RNA molecules literally shape genomes, carving out chunks to keep and discarding others. There are even hints that certain small RNAs might help chart a cell’s destiny by directing genes to turn on or off during… read more

Small science to be big in 2005: analysts

January 21, 2005

“Nanotechnology” will be a much more familiar word to everyone in 2005, not just scientists, say analysts.

In 2005, people will start noticing its mundane uses, like making car paint shinier, windows that clean themselves, and smaller and better mobile batteries.

Small Thoughts for a Global Grid

September 2, 2003

Dr. Richard E. Smalley, discoverer of nanoscale buckyballs, has become increasingly hopeful about the potential of new technologies based on hydrogen and renewable energy sources like wind and solar power.

He believes carbon nanotubes could be woven into long wires that would be more efficient conductors than copper yet far lighter, making it much cheaper to move solar and wind power to places it is needed.

Small Times launches micro-, nano-oriented website

April 30, 2001

smalltimes.com is a new web site “devoted entirely to the fast-growing industry that includes MEMS, microsystems and nanotechnologies.”

The publisher will also launch Small Times Magazine in September 2001.

Small word network

July 5, 2002

Word association can link just about any two common (root) words in the English language using an average of three steps (degrees of separation), says a team of scientists at Arizona State University.
The researchers think the network structure of a language probably has its origins in the nature of cognition and memory. Different concepts, such as “actor” and “universe,” are closely linked by a short series of semantic… read more

Small world networks key to memory

May 28, 2004

Working memory appears to be based on simple networks of “small world” (maximally connected) neurons in the prefrontal cortex that participate in self-sustaining bursts of electrical activity.

Northwestern University researchers have created a model of these networks, using simple neurons that when activated would activate their neighbours for a brief period: an activating pulse travelled through the network and then disappeared at the fringes. They then added shortcuts to… read more

Small worlds come into focus with new Sandia microscope

June 12, 2012

AC-Stem-sandia

Sandia’s new aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC-STEM) is 50 to 100 times better than what came before, both in resolution and the time it takes to analyze a sample.

The AC-STEM delivers electron beams accelerated at voltages from 80 kV to 200 kV, allowing researchers to study properties of structures at the nanoscale — crucial for materials scientists working on everything from microelectronics to nuclear weapons.
High-clarity… read more

Smaller Than a Pushpin, More Powerful Than a PC

February 7, 2005

IBM, Sony and Toshiba will announce details Monday of The Cell, a microprocessor chip with a theoretical peak performance of 256 gigaflops (billion mathematical operations per seccond).

The Cell promises to enhance video gaming and digital home entertainment as well as high-performance scientific and engineering systems.

Smaller thermal cameras with smaller pixels for warfighters

Compact five-micron-pixel LWIR camera demonstrated
April 22, 2013

(credit: DARPA)

DARPA researchers have demonstrated a new five-micron-pixel long-wave infrared (LWIR) camera that could make this class of camera smaller and less expensive. (A micron is a millionth of a meter.)

The military uses LWIR (also know as “far IR”) cameras as thermal imagers to detect humans at night. These cameras are usually mounted on vehicles as they are too large to be carried by a… read more

Smaller Version of the Solar System Is Discovered

February 15, 2008

Astronomers had found a miniature version of our own solar system 5,000 light-years across the galaxy — the first planetary system that really looks like our own, with outer giant planets and room for smaller inner planets.

The new discovery was made by a technique called microlensing: the gravity of the nearer star can bend and magnify the light from the more distant one, causing it to get much… read more

Smallest atomic displacements ever may lead to new new classes of electronic devices

September 6, 2011

Set Up

An international team of scientists has developed a novel X-ray technique for imaging atomic displacements in materials with unprecedented accuracy, using a recently discovered class of exotic materials — multiferroics — that can be simultaneously magnetically and electrically ordered.

Multiferroics are also candidate materials for new classes of electronic devices.

The researchers are from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble (France), the University

read more

Smallest Electronic Component: Researchers Create Molecular Diode

October 19, 2009

(Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University)

Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute researchers and collaborators have found a way to make single-molecule diodes, which could surpass silicon limits.

Smallest known galaxy with supermassive black hole discovered

Black holes may be more common than we thought
September 18, 2014

This Hubble Space telescope image shows the gargantuan galaxy M60 on the left and the ultracompact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1 below it and to the right, and also enlarged as an inset. A new international study found that M60-UCD1 is the smallest known galaxy with a supermassive black hole at its center, suggesting that the dwarf galaxy originally was much larger but was stripped of its outer layers by gravity from galaxy M60 over billions of years. M60’s gravity also is pulling galaxy NGC4647, upper right, and the two eventually will collide. (Credit: NASA/Space Telescope Science Institute/European Space Agency)

Astronomers have discovered that an ultracompact dwarf galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole with a mass equal to 21 million suns — the smallest galaxy known to contain such a massive black hole. The finding suggests that huge black holes may be more common than previously believed.

“It is the smallest and lightest object that we know of that has a supermassive black hole,” says Anil Seth, lead author… read more

Smallest superconductor promises cool electronics

March 31, 2010

Ohio University researchers have made four-molecule-long nanowires — the smallest superconducting structure yet reported.

The nanowires achieve two objectives of engineers trying to maintain exponential growth in the power of electronics: making components smaller and making them produce less waste heat.

The nanoscopic wires were made by placing a mixture of a large organic molecule and a salt of the metal gallium. The molecules in the mixture then… read more

Smallest Swiss cross made of 20 single atoms

A step towards next-generation atomic-scale storage devices
July 17, 2014

20 bromine atoms positioned on a sodium chloride surface using the tip of an atomic force microscope at room temperature, creating a Swiss cross with the size of 5.6nm. The structure is stable at room temperature and was achieved by exchanging chlorine with bromine atoms. (Credit: Department of Physics, University of Basel)

University of Basel physicists with teams from Finland and Japan were able to place 20 single bromine atoms on a fully insulated surface at room temperature to form the smallest “Swiss cross,” taking a step towards next-generation atomic-scale storage devices.

Nature Communications has published their results.

Ever since the 1990s, physicists have been able to directly control surface structures by moving and positioning single atoms to… read more

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