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Samsung’s gun-toting robot

December 5, 2006

The Intelligent Surveillance and Security Guard Robot, being developed by Samsung, will guarantee “perfect guarding operation,” in contrast with human guards who are all too prone to succumb to fatigue or inclement weather.

It has two cameras–one for daytime watch and another, infrared one for the night–and a laser rangefinder.

Sandia Labs developing nanobattery implant

January 17, 2006
Schematic of nanobattery that would be implanted in or near the eye

Sandia National Laboratories researchers are developing a nano-size battery that one day could be implanted in the eye to power an artificial retina. The artificial retina and accompanying nanobattery will be used to correct certain types of macular degeneration.

“We will use our expertise in multi-scale modeling to understand and predict how transporter structure leads to function, with an initial focus on specialized transporters found in the… read more

Sandia Labs technology used in Fukushima cleanup

May 29, 2012

sandia_CST

A Sandia National Laboratories technology has been used to remove radioactive material from more than 43 million gallons of contaminated wastewater at Japan’s damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Sandia researchers worked around the clock following the March 2011 disaster to show the technology worked in seawater, which was pumped in to cool the plant’s towers.

Sandia scientists previously found that a certain class… read more

Sandia nuclear-fusion liners break even in tests

September 19, 2012

Ryan_McBride

Magnetically imploded tubes called liners, intended to help produce controlled nuclear fusion at scientific “break-even” energies or better within the next few years, have functioned successfully in preliminary tests, according to a Sandia research paper accepted for publication by Physical Review Letters (PRL).

To exceed scientific break-even is the most hotly sought-after goal of fusion research, in which the energy released by a fusion reaction is… read more

Sandia Sensors to Track Terrorists

April 24, 2002

Sandia National Laboratories has launched a $2.5 million crash program to create an advanced sensor to track terrorists. The smart, golf ball-sized sensors, dropped in a city or in enemy territory, could communicate with one another to identify and track terrorists’ activities and report back.

Sandia team develops cognitive machines

August 15, 2003

Sandia National Laboratories is developing cognitive machines that accurately infer user intent, remember experiences with users, and allow users to call upon simulated experts to help them analyze situations and make decisions.

The initial goal of the work was to create a “synthetic human” that could think like a person. Work on cognitive machines took off in 2002 with a contract from DARPA to develop a real-time machine that… read more

SANYO Breaks Solar Cell Record

May 22, 2009

SANYO Electric has broken its own record for the world’s highest energy conversion efficiency in practical size (100 cm2 or more) crystalline silicon-type solar cells, achieving a efficiency of 23.0% (until now 22.3%) at a research level for its proprietary HIT solar photovoltaic cells.

SARS Virus is Mutating, Fear Doctors

April 18, 2003

“A cluster of SARS patients in Hong Kong with unusual symptoms has prompted concern that the virus causing the disease is mutating….Scientists in Hong Kong are now urgently sequencing key genes from recently isolated coronaviruses to reveal any changes.”

Sasser computer worm wriggles worldwide

May 5, 2004

More than a million computers around the world have been infected by the “Sasser” computer worm or one of its variants.

Sasser does not rely on email to spread and requires no action by users to infect a machine. Each variant of the worm infects computers across a network by exploiting a bug in a part of Microsoft’s Windows XP and Windows 2000 operating systems called the Local Security… read more

Satellite could open door on extra dimension

May 31, 2006

T%here could be several thousand black holes in the solar system, say Duke University researchers, and they may soon be detected.

Their gravity should bend light passing nearby, so that light passing on one side of a black hole should take a different amount of time to go by than light passing on the other side, detectable by interference patterns during gamma-ray bursts.

Satellite quantum communication circles closer

July 30, 2010

A new quantum protocol is the first that promises to work independently of the orientation of spin on pairs of entangled photons shared between a sender and receiver, which will prove vital if quantum communications are ever to be sent via satellites (a spinning satellite’s sense of up and down changes over time, making it harder to interpret a photon’s spin and establish a key).read more

Saudi Arabia unveils grand supercomputer ambitions

September 26, 2008

Saudi Arabia plans to build a petascale supercomputer system in two years that could rank among the 10 most powerful systems in the world, and beyond that, an exascale system (1000 times as fast as petascale).

Code-named Shaheen (Peregrine Falcon), it is being built by IBM, based on the Blue Gene/P System, and will intially run at 222 teraflops. It will be located at King Abdullah University of Science… read more

Savant for a Day

June 23, 2003

Cognitive scientist Allan Snyder has found that 40 percent of test subjects undergoing transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) exhibited extraordinary, and newfound, mental skills.

Saving information on a computer boosts human memory resources for new information

.. but only when the storage medium is trusted
December 11, 2014

(Credit: iStock)

The simple act of saving something, such as a file on a computer, may improve our memory for the information we encounter next, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research suggests that the act of saving helps to free up cognitive resources that can be used to remember new information.

“Our findings show that people are significantly better at… read more

Saving Lives with Living Machines

July 1, 2003

Hybrid devices that are part machine, part living cells offer new hope to patients with kidney problems for whom purely artificial treatments like dialysis aren’t good enough.

A “bioartificial kidney,” being developed by Nephros Therapeutics, is based on a plastic cartridge containing one billion human kidney cells thriving inside 4,000 translucent, hollow, plastic fibers. It is based on a decade of research by University of Michigan internist David Humes.… read more

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