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Big step in tiny technology

August 28, 2008
(Manfred Buck)

University of St Andrews researchers have developed a method of creating self-assembling nanostructures just one molecule thick — no sophisticated equipment or special environment (such as a high vacuum) required — as an alternative to conventional lithography, which is imprecise on a scale of a few nanometers.

The solution-based chemistry method assembles molecules into tiny dimples, themselves created when molecules self-assemble into a honeycomb-shaped network on a… read more

Saving Lives With Tailor-Made Medication

August 29, 2006

Pharmacogenetics, a clinical discipline in which doctors use high-tech genetic testing to custom-make drugs to patients’ individual needs, will mean that we define smaller and smaller markets for every drug.

Instead of one medication for high blood pressure, a manufacturer will have to produce dozens of variants and combinations.

Research links pesticides with ADHD in children

May 17, 2010

A new analysis of U.S. health data, published Monday in Pediatrics, links children’s attention-deficit disorder with exposure to common pesticides used on fruits and vegetables.

“Exposure is practically ubiquitous. We’re all exposed,” said lead author Maryse Bouchard of the University of Montreal.

The study provides more evidence that the government should encourage farmers to switch to organic methods, said Margaret Reeves, senior scientist with the Pesticide Action Network.… read more

Terahertz rays allow imaging at nanoscale

October 24, 2003

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute researchers have shown that terahertz rays can be used in conjunction with scanning near-field microscopy, according to a paper published in Applied Physics Letter.

The technique circumvents the usual “diffraction limit” on imaging methods, which restricts the resolution to the same order of magnitude as the wavelength of the radiation used.

By demonstrating a resolution of 150 nm using THz radiation of 150 microns, the… read more

B-vitamin Deficiency May Cause Vascular Cognitive Impairment

September 3, 2008

Deficiency of folate, B12 and B6- caused cognitive dysfunction and reductions in brain capillary length and density in mice, according to a Tufts University study.

Amazing Earth video from the Space Station

September 19, 2011

The Earth from the Space Station

Science educator James Drake built this amazing timelapse video from the perspective of the International Space Station as it flew over North and South America, created it by downloading a series of 600 photographs, Universe Today reports.

Spinning new theory on particle spin brings science closer to quantum computing

September 11, 2006

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have devised a potentially groundbreaking theory demonstrating how to control the spin of particles without using superconducting magnets — a development that could advance the field of spintronics and bring scientists a step closer to quantum computing.

Allen Institute for Brain Science launches Allen Human Brain Atlas

May 25, 2010

The Allen Institute for Brain Science has launched the Allen Human Brain Atlas, a publicly available online atlas charting genes at work throughout the human brain.

The data provided in this initial data release represent the most extensive and detailed body of information about gene activity in the human brain to date, documenting which genes are expressed, or “turned on,” where.

The Allen Human Brain Atlas, available at… read more

Logic and memory shown on molecular scale

November 3, 2003

Rice University researchers have demonstrated that molecule-sized electronic devices can be used for both logic and memory, despite being randomly wired, error-prone and inaccurately formed at the nanoscale.

Rice professor James Tour said his work demonstrates that today’s chip makers can achieve increases of two to three orders of magnitude in chip density by leveraging the lithographic tools they already have to form random-access addresses into arrays of nanoscale… read more

Google to Digitize Newspaper Archives

September 9, 2008

Google has expanded its microfilm scanning of some newspapers’ historic archives to make them searchable online, first through Google News and eventually on the papers’ own Web sites.

Intel takes a bite out of NVIDIA’s HPC business

September 26, 2011

Stampede, an Intel 10-petaflop supercomputer, scheduled to boot up at the end of 2012, will have 8 petaflops of Intel’s Intel’s first big Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessors, HPCwire blogger Michael Feldman reports.

Copper Circuits Help Brain Function; Could Tweaking the Circuits Make Us Smarter?

September 26, 2006

The flow of copper in the brain has a previously unrecognized role in cell death, learning and memory, according to research at Washington University School of Medicine.

The researchers’ findings suggest that copper and its transporter, a protein called Atp7a, are vital to human thinking. They speculate that variations in the genes coding for Atp7a, as well as other proteins of copper homeostasis, could partially account for differences in… read more

Surveillance Software Knows What a Camera Sees

June 1, 2010

(Song-Chun Zhu/UCLA)

I2T (Image to Text), a prototype computer vision system that can generate a live text description of what’s happening in a feed from a surveillance camera, has been developed by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles and ObjectVideo of Reston, VA.

It puts a series of computer vision algorithms into a system that takes images or video frames as input, and spits out summaries of what they… read more

How Does the Brain Work?

November 11, 2003

While lacking a coherent framework, scientists are making progress in mapping the correlations between brain activity and behavior.

New imaging tools reveal circuits and overall patterns of activity as people solve problems or reflect on their feelings. Genes expressed in mouse brain cells are being mapped so that researchers can begin to find out if neurons that look alike have different proteins and functions. A magnetic device can knock… read more

Warning sounded on web’s future

September 17, 2008

Sir Tim Berners-Lee’s new World Wide Web Foundation is looking for ways to give websites a label for trustworthiness once they had been proved reliable sources and help people separate rumor from real science.

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