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Spinach Could Power Better Solar Cells

September 22, 2004

MIT Researchers integrated a protein complex derived from spinach chloroplasts with organic semiconductors to make a solar cell that could be combined with solid state electronics.

Previous efforts to integrate the energy harnessing capability of chlorophyll with conventional electronics have failed because it normally requires a watery environment in which to work. Here researchers artificially stabilized the protein complex at the heart of their system using synthetic peptides to… read more

Spinal cord stem cells could be basis of new treatment

July 22, 2008

A researcher at MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory has pinpointed stem cells within the spinal cord that, if persuaded to differentiate into more healing cells and fewer scarring cells following an injury, may lead to a new, non-surgical treatment for debilitating spinal-cord injuries.

MIT news

Spinning Earth twists space

October 21, 2004

“Frame-dragging,” one of the last untested predictions of general relativity, has been confirmed by the first reasonably accurate measurement of how the rotating Earth warps the fabric of space.

Researchers charted the path of two NASA satellites over 11 years with laser range-finders with the precision of a few millimeters. The effect dragged the satellite’s orbits out of position by about 2 meters each year, the researchers report in… read more

Spinning new theory on particle spin brings science closer to quantum computing

September 11, 2006

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have devised a potentially groundbreaking theory demonstrating how to control the spin of particles without using superconducting magnets — a development that could advance the field of spintronics and bring scientists a step closer to quantum computing.

Spinning Silk into Sensors

January 5, 2009

Tufts University researchers have developed a simple process that turns silk cocoons into nanoscale optical devices with biological applications such as oxygen and tumor sensors.

Spinning spare parts

May 4, 2012

cytograft1

Cytograft Tissue Engineering has developed a “human textile” process for weaving human threads into blood vessel patches and grafts that a patient’s body would readily accept for wound repair.

The process is faster and could be more cost-effective than other methods of producing biological tissue replacements, which are also not rejected, so they remain in the body.

Basically, researchers grow human skin cells in a culture flask under conditions… read more

Spintronic logic gate promises computing advance

June 1, 2007

University of California, San Diego researchers have drawn up plans for a semiconductor-based spintronic device that performs the same logical operations as the transistors in a normal silicon chip.

They have also shown how its spintronic logic gates could be integrated into large-scale integrated circuits.

Spintronic organic LED: brighter, cheaper, environment-friendlier

Could be on the market in five years
July 16, 2012

Spin-OLED device structure

University of Utah physicists have invented a new “spintronic” organic light-emitting diode (OLED) that promises to be brighter, cheaper and more environmentally friendly than the kinds of LEDs now used in television and computer displays, lighting, traffic lights and numerous electronic devices.

The Utah physicists made a prototype of the new kind of LED — known technically as a spin-polarized organic LED or spin OLED —… read more

Spintronic speed limit defined for next generation of high-performing data-storage devices

August 30, 2012

vortex-core-350px

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have precisely measured a key parameter of electron interactions called non-adiabatic spin torque that is essential to the future development of spintronic data storage devices.

(Current data storage technology has a functional limit: magnetically stored digital information becomes unstable when too tightly packed. The denser, faster, and smarter technology of spintronics may offer a solution. Spintronic devices use electron spin to… read more

‘Spintronics’ could enable a new generation of electronic devices

August 11, 2003

Theoretical physicists at Stanford and the University of Tokyo says they have discovered the equivalent of a new “Ohm’s Law” for spintronics.

”Unlike the Ohm’s Law for electronics, the new ‘Ohm’s Law’ that we’ve discovered says that the spin of the electron can be transported without any loss of energy, or dissipation,” says Shoucheng Zhang, a physics professor at Stanford. “Furthermore, this effect occurs at room temperature in materials… read more

Spintronics may save Moore’s Law

March 10, 2006

The Western Institute of Nanoelectronics is being established with grants of $18.2 million, largely from semiconductor companies with an interest in breakthroughs in spintronics, which holds promise in minimizing power consumption for next-generation consumer electronics.

Spiraling nanotrees offer new twist on growth of nanowires

May 2, 2008

University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have discovered a new way of growing nanowires that leads to “nanopines”–elaborate pine-tree-shaped nanowires–caused by a “screw” dislocation, or defect, in their crystal structure.

Dislocations are fundamental to the growth and characteristics of all crystalline materials, but this is the first time they’ve been shown to aid the growth of one-dimensional nanostructures.

Engineering these dislocations may allow scientists to create more elaborate nanostructures, and… read more

Spleen may be source of versatile stem cells

January 20, 2005

Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have found further evidence that the spleen might be a source of adult stem cells.

Previously the researchers found evidence that splenic stem cells existed and could regenerate the insulin-producing islets of the pancreas. In a follow-up study, they now report that these potential adult stem cells produce a protein previously believed to be present only during the embryonic development of mammals. The finding both… read more

Splice It Yourself

May 12, 2005

The advent of garage biology is at hand. Skills and technology are proliferating, and the synthesis and manipulation of genomes are no longer confined to ivory towers.

The technology has even reached the toy market: The Discovery DNA Explorer kit for kids 10 and older is surprisingly functional at $80.

Spoiler alert: Your TV will be hacked

April 19, 2012

(Credit: iStockphoto)

Last week you may have read a headline that blared “100 million TVs will be Web-connected by 2016.” So will Internet TVs will be hacked as successfully as previous generations of digital devices?

“Of course they will,” says security advisor Roger Grimes, who has successfully hacked Internet-connected TVs. “Nothing in a computer built into a TV makes it less attackable than a PC. Internet-connected TVs have IP… read more

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