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Spiraling nanotrees offer new twist on growth of nanowires

May 2, 2008

University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have discovered a new way of growing nanowires that leads to “nanopines”–elaborate pine-tree-shaped nanowires–caused by a “screw” dislocation, or defect, in their crystal structure.

Dislocations are fundamental to the growth and characteristics of all crystalline materials, but this is the first time they’ve been shown to aid the growth of one-dimensional nanostructures.

Engineering these dislocations may allow scientists to create more elaborate nanostructures, and… read more

Spleen may be source of versatile stem cells

January 20, 2005

Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have found further evidence that the spleen might be a source of adult stem cells.

Previously the researchers found evidence that splenic stem cells existed and could regenerate the insulin-producing islets of the pancreas. In a follow-up study, they now report that these potential adult stem cells produce a protein previously believed to be present only during the embryonic development of mammals. The finding both… read more

Splice It Yourself

May 12, 2005

The advent of garage biology is at hand. Skills and technology are proliferating, and the synthesis and manipulation of genomes are no longer confined to ivory towers.

The technology has even reached the toy market: The Discovery DNA Explorer kit for kids 10 and older is surprisingly functional at $80.

Spoiler alert: Your TV will be hacked

April 19, 2012

(Credit: iStockphoto)

Last week you may have read a headline that blared “100 million TVs will be Web-connected by 2016.” So will Internet TVs will be hacked as successfully as previous generations of digital devices?

“Of course they will,” says security advisor Roger Grimes, who has successfully hacked Internet-connected TVs. “Nothing in a computer built into a TV makes it less attackable than a PC. Internet-connected TVs have IP… read more

Sponge’s secret weapon restores antibiotics’ power

February 17, 2009

Algeferin, a chemical from an ocean sponge, can reprogram antibiotic resistant bacteria to make them vulnerable to medicines again, new evidence from Hollings Marine Laboratory research suggests.

Spontaneous Assembly: A New Look At How Proteins Assemble And Organize Themselves Into Complex Patterns

July 9, 2009
PALM composite of an E.coli bacterial cell shows the organization of proteins in the chemotaxis signaling network (DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

The chemotaxis network of signaling proteins in E.coli bacteria is able to spontaneously form from clusters of proteins in complex pattterns in “stochastic self-assembly,” a team of researchers has found, using an ultrahigh-precision visible light microscopy technique called PALM (Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy).

Signaling proteins direct the movement of the bacteria towards or away from sugars, amino acids, and many other soluble molecules in response to environmental cues.… read more

‘Spooky action at a distance’ to be tested aboard the ISS

April 11, 2013

International Space Station (credit: NASA)

Researchers at the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information in Austria and the European Space Agency have proposed using the International Space Station (ISS) to test the limits of “spooky action at a distance” (remote quantum entanglement) and potentially help to develop the first global quantum communication network.

Albert Einstein famously described quantum entanglement as “spooky action at distance”; however, up until now, experiments… read more

Spooky steps to a quantum network

October 5, 2006

Quantum entanglement, a strange property that links particles however far apart they are, may be used to “teleport” information.

Spoonful Of Sugar’ Makes The Worms’ Life Span Go Down

November 6, 2009

By adding just a small amount of glucose to the C. elegans worm diet, University of California, San Francisco and Pohang University of Science and Technology researchers found the worms lose about 20 percent of their usual life span, suggesting that a diet with a low glycemic index may extend human life span.

They trace the effect to insulin signals, which can block aquaporin channels that transport glycerol.… read more

Spot-welding a graphene nanoribbon to connect into a circuit

June 17, 2013

GNR_on_Au(111)_6

Scientists at Aalto University and Utrecht University have created single-atom contacts between gold and graphene nanoribbons.

The challenge for graphene devices has been how design a contact (to connect the graphene to a circuit wire) without affecting the performance of the graphene nanostructures.

Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice. It is anticipated to be a revolutionizing material… read more

Spotting Cancer Sooner

August 3, 2004

Blood tests that detect cancer in its early stages would save countless lives. The first could arrive within a year, using pattern-recognition algorithms for protein profiling.

Sprawling systems teeter on IT chaos

November 29, 2004

The UK government is spearheading a 10 million pound program aimed at finding ways to avert catastrophic failures in large IT networks.

Hidden flaws could lead to crashes in critical networks like healthcare, banking systems, and power grids.

Now all government departments, health services and education systems across the 25 countries of the European Union are being linked to the internet. But there is a real danger that… read more

Spray-on liquid glass is about to revolutionize almost everything

February 2, 2010

Turkish scientists have developed spray-on liquid glass that is transparent, non-toxic, and can protect virtually any surface against almost any damage from hazards such as water, UV radiation, dirt, heat, and bacterial infections, making cleaning products unnecessary. The invisible coating is also flexible and breathable, which makes it suitable for use on an enormous array of products.

The liquid glass spray consists of almost pure silicon dioxide (silica, the… read more

Spreading the load

December 12, 2007

A new wave of science projects on the web is harnessing volunteers’ computers in novel ways — and their brains, too.

Spring-loaded nanotubes could be used in microcircuits

June 13, 2003

Multiwalled nanotubes can act like telescoping spring-loaded shock absorbers, opening the possibility of use in silicon circuits and optoelectronic devices, according to an article in Nature Materials Update, June 12, 2003.

In experiments at Vanderbilt University, it was found that if the inner tubes are partially pulled out and then released, they spring back inside their sheath, oscillating back and forth at a frequency of around 1 gigahertz until… read more

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