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Scientists reveal secret of girl with ‘all seeing eye’

July 21, 2009
MRI scan shows how the retinal optic nerve has connected to the left hemisphere of the brain

a girl’s brain had rewired itself to process information from the right and left visual fields in spite of her not having a whole brain at birth, University of Glasgow researchers have found.

Scientists reveal secrets for reaching age 100 (or more)

Prime factors: long telemere length (pre-age 100) and low inflammation
August 6, 2015

Telomere length in study participants up to 115 years of age. Leukocyte telomere length vs age is shown for males (blue or cyan) and females (green or red). Centenarians, (semi-)supercentenarians, and centenarian offspring are shown in blue (males) or red (females), respectively. Unrelated participants younger than 100 years are indicated in cyan (males) or green (females). Regression lines belonging to these groups are indicated by the same colour. (credit: Yasumichi Arai et al./EBioMedicine)

Scientists say they have cracked the secret of why some people live a healthy and physically independent life over the age of 100: keeping inflammation down and telomeres long.

Newcastle University’s Institute for Ageing in the U.K. and Keio University School of Medicine note that severe inflammation is part of many diseases in the old, such as diabetes or diseases attacking the bones… read more

Scientists revolutionize creation of genetically altered mice to model human disease

May 6, 2013

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Whitehead Institute Founding Member Rudolf Jaenisch, who helped transform the study of genetics by creating the first transgenic mouse in 1974, is again revolutionizing how genetically altered animal models are created and perhaps even redefining what species may serve as models.

“This new method is a game changer,” says Jaenisch, who is also a professor of biology at MIT. “We can now make a… read more

Scientists rewriting the genetic code

July 24, 2001

Scientists are taking the first steps toward creating alternative life forms — organisms that use a genetic code different from the one used by all other creatures on earth.
Scientists hope that such organisms can be used to study biochemical processes in new ways and to produce new medical or electronic materials that cannot now be made by living things.

The research goes well beyond current genetic engineering, which… read more

Scientists Say a Quest for Clean Energy Must Begin Now

November 1, 2002

Meeting the world’s rising energy needs without increasing global warming will require a research effort as ambitious as the Apollo project to put a man on the moon, a diverse group of scientists and engineers said in Science magazine today.

Also see: Space-Based Power System Needed to Solve Earth’s Energy Woes

Scientists Say Administration Distorts Facts

February 19, 2004

More than 60 influential scientists, including 20 Nobel laureates, issued a statement yesterday asserting that the Bush administration had systematically distorted scientific fact in the service of policy goals on the environment, health, biomedical research and nuclear weaponry at home and abroad.

According to the report, the Bush administration has misrepresented scientific consensus on global warming, censored at least one report on climate change, manipulated scientific findings on the… read more

Scientists say dolphins should be treated as non-human persons

January 7, 2010

Scientists studying dolphin behavior have suggested they could be the most intelligent creatures on Earth after humans, saying the size of their brains in relation to body size is larger than that of our closest relatives, the chimpanzees, and their behaviors suggest complex intelligence.

One scientist said they should therefore be treated as “non-human persons” and granted rights as individuals.

Scientists say dolphins should be treated as ‘non-human persons’

January 10, 2011

Dolphins have been declared the world’s second most intelligent creatures after humans, with scientists suggesting they are so bright that they should be treated as “non-human persons.”

“Many dolphin brains are larger than our own and second in mass only to the human brain when corrected for body size,” said Lori Marino, a zoologist at Emory University. “The neuroanatomy suggests psychological continuity between humans and dolphins and has profound… read more

Scientists say nerves use sound, not electricity

March 12, 2007

Copenhagen University researchers theorize that propagation of sonic solitons is a much more likely explanation for propagation of signal in neurons than electrical impulses.

The physicists say because the nerve membrane is made of a material similar to olive oil that can change from liquid to solid through temperature variations, they can freeze and propagate the solitons.

The scientists, whose work is in the Biophysical Society’s Biophysical Journal,… read more

Scientists say poles might flip

December 15, 2003

The Earth’s protective magnetic field has fallen about 10 percent since 1845 and if that continues, the field could flip.

These flips happen every 200,000 years, on average, scientists say. The last one was 780,000 years ago.

Whether the field flips or merely continues to weaken, more harmful particles would flow in from the sun, resulting in an estimated extra 100,000 cancer cases a year; and solar particles… read more

Scientists Say They’ve Found a Code Beyond Genetics in DNA

July 25, 2006

Researchers believe they have found a second code in DNA in addition to the genetic code. The second code, superimposed on the first, sets the placement of the nucleosomes, miniature protein spools around which the DNA is looped.

Scientists see promise in deep-learning programs

November 27, 2012

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Using deep learning, an AI technique inspired by theories about how the brain recognizes patterns, technology companies are reporting startling gains in fields as diverse as computer vision, speech recognition and the identification of promising new molecules for designing drugs, The New York Times reports.

The advances have led to widespread enthusiasm among researchers who design software to perform human activities like seeing, listening and thinking. They offer… read more

Scientists Seek to Create ‘Three-Parent’ Babies

October 20, 2004

UK Scientists are applying for a license to create human embryos with three genetic parents: their cells would contain a nucleus with genes from both parents, and their mitochondria would be from a woman other than the mother.

The aim is ultimately to prevent children from inheriting genetic diseases caused by mutations in DNA housed by their mitochondria — components of cells that produce energy.

Scientists Seek Ways to Rebuild the Body, Bypassing the Embryos

December 19, 2001

Alternatives to controversial human embryonic stem cells are being explored for creating tissue needed to repair damaged organs.
Possibilities include:

  • Adult stems cells are rare, hard to isolate and purify, hard to grow in culture, and may not exist for all tissues. Some success has been achieved with umbilical cord blood and fat sources.
  • Other cells are created from various sources, such as human embryos (by
  • read more

    Scientists seek ways to ward off killer asteroids

    December 22, 2008

    A blue-ribbon panel of scientists is trying to determine the best way to detect and ward off any wandering space rocks that might be on a collision course with Earth.

    The panel has been commmissioned by the National Academy of Sciences to propose the best way to detect and analyze 90 percent of the “near Earth objects” orbiting between Mars and Venus that are wider than 460 feet by… read more

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