science + technology news

Scientists and bankers — a new model army

April 12, 2012

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Bankers must surrender more information on their activities to scientists to use it to build better system-wide financial models, says John Liechty, director of the Center for the Study of Global Financial Stability and Professor of Marketing and Statistics at Pennsylvania State University in University Park.

Existing financial models failed to predict the crisis of 2008 and the follow-on crisis of 2011–12. They missed the huge system-wide risks that… read more

Scientists Announce First 3-D Assembly Of Magnetic And Semiconducting Nanoparticles

June 27, 2003

Scientists from Columbia University, IBM and the University of New Orleans today announced a new, three-dimensional designer material assembled from two different types of nanoparticles.

In the June 26 issue of the journal Nature, the team describes the precision chemistry methods developed to tune the particles’ sizes in increments of less than one nanometer and to tailor the experimental conditions so the particles would assemble themselves into repeating 3-D… read more

Scientists Announce Top 10 New Species In Last Year

May 27, 2008

The International Institute for Species Exploration at Arizona State University and an international committee of taxonomists has just announced the top 10 new species described in 2007.

On the list are an ornate sleeper ray, with a name that sucks: Electrolux; a 75-million-year-old giant duck-billed dinosaur; a shocking pink millipede; a rare, off-the-shelf frog; one of the most venomous snakes in the world; a fruit bat; a mushroom; a… read more

SCIENTISTS ARE A WHISKER AWAY FROM SEMICONDUCTING NANOWIRES

June 25, 2002

Boron crystalline nanowires (“nanowhiskers”) may replace carbon nanotubes as nanoscale semiconductors.

Scientists Ask: What Is A Gene, Anyway?

December 17, 2002

Two years after the human genome was mapped, scientists are drawing a stunning insight by comparing human genes with those of mice. Researchers now agree human genes are definitely missing something; they’re just not entirely sure what. Figuring it out could involve arguments about the very definition of the word “gene.”

Scientists attach barcodes to mouse embryos — human ones coming soon

November 26, 2010

Bar-coded embryos (UAB)

Scientists from Spain’s Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), along with colleagues from the Spanish National Research Council, have successfully developed an identification system in which mouse embryos and oocytes (egg cells) are physically tagged with microscopic silicon bar code labels. They expect to try it out on human embryos and oocytes soon.

The purpose of the system is to streamline in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer procedures. If egg… read more

Scientists Breed Cancer-Beating Mice

May 2, 2003

The fight against cancer could be helped by the discovery of a strain of mice which appear to have the ability to resist the disease.

Scientists Bringing ‘Table Top’ Particle Accelerators a Step Closer

September 30, 2004

Three research teams announced new developments in producing relativistic electron beams using laser-produced plasmas to accelerate the beams.

The beams have a narrow energy spread and are focusable. These new developments could help to shrink the size and cost of future particle accelerators for fundamental physics experiments and applications in materials and biomedicine. Laser electron accelerators could eventually fit into a university basement.

All three research teams published… read more

Scientists build ‘smart’ material made of DNA

October 24, 2012

The DNA gel is composed of stiff DNA nanotubes connected to each other via long, flexible DNA linkers. A motor protein, FtsK50C, binds to special sites on the linkers. When ATP, a biochemical fuel, is allowed to permeate the gel, the motor molecules reel in the linkers to which they are bound, drawing nanotubes together, and stiffening the gel. (Credit: Peter Allen/UCSB)

UC Santa Barbara scientists Omar Saleh and Deborah Fygenson have created a dynamic gel made of DNA that mechanically responds to stimuli in much the same way that cells do.

The project has potential applications in smart materials, artificial muscle, understanding cytoskeletal mechanics, research into nonequilibrium physics, and DNA nanotechnology.

“The gel has active mechanical capabilities in that it generates forces independently, leading to… read more

Scientists build a world of ‘software beings’

May 22, 2006

Politicians could one day determine the results of elections before they take place, thanks to a European research project that will study social interactions between millions of virtual human beings.

Scientists build battery in a nanowire

August 1, 2011

A schematic shows nanoscale battery/supercapacitor devices in an array, as constructed at Rice University. The devices show promise for powering nanoscale electronics and as a research tool for understanding electrochemical phenomenon at the nanoscale (credit: Ajayan Lab/Rice University)

Researchers at Rice University have packed an entire lithium ion energy storage device into a single nanowire.

The researchers first reported the creation of three-dimensional nanobatteries last December. In that project, they encased vertical arrays of nickel-tin nanowires in PMMA (Plexiglas) that served as an electrolyte and insulator. They grew the nanowires via electrodeposition in an anodized alumina template atop a copper substrate.

In that… read more

Scientists build DNA nano-devices

January 4, 2002

New York University researchers claim to have taken a major step in building more controllable machines from DNA. The researchers say that the new device may help build the foundation for the development of sophisticated machines at a molecular scale, ultimately evolving to the development of nano-robots that might some day build new molecules, computer circuits or fight infectious diseases.
The research team was led by NYU chemistry professor Nadrian… read more

Scientists Build Memory Chip as Small as Blood Cell

January 25, 2007

Scientists have built a working memory chip with 160,000 bits capacity that is roughly the size of a white blood cell — about 1/2000th of an inch on a side.

The chip has a bit density of 100 billion per square centimeter, about 20 times greater than current memory chips.

A key component of the memory chip is a molecular switch using rotaxanes.

Scientists build mind-reading computer

June 3, 2008

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a system that can forecast the activity patterns a brain will create for a specific word.

Subjects were given 58 concrete nouns and asked to think about the meaning and properties of the words. Brain scans taken when the users were thinking about the different words were then captured using magnetic resonance imaging.

The researchers identified a number of the basic… read more

Scientists build polio virus from scratch

July 16, 2002

Scientists have built the virus that causes polio from scratch in the lab, using only genetic sequence information from public databases and readily available technology. The finding raises the possibility that bioterrorists could use a similar approach to create devasting diseases without having to gain access to protected viral stocks.

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