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The next big thing (is practically invisible)

March 28, 2003

Nanoparticles now turn up in everyday products from tennis balls to sunscreen but some activists are calling for regulation and even a moratorium on some types of nanoscale research.

The Next Big Thing For Wireless

January 18, 2004

WiMax is seven times faster than Wi-Fi and has a range up to as 30 miles vs. about 100 feet, so it could be used as an alternative to copper wire and coaxial cable for connecting homes and businesses to the Internet. Intel also plans to embed it in a chip so it can be built directly into PCs and laptops.

The next big thing is actually ultrawide

July 2, 2004

The Freescale Semiconductor division of Motorola has developed ultrawideband (UWB) technology for sending data wirelessly at 110Mbps and plans for 1Gbps transmission in 2005.

UWB technology is currently hobbled by regulatory challenges and a long-running clash between two incompatible systems.

Ultrawideband works by broadcasting over a much larger chunk of the radio spectrum, so even a low-powered ultrawideband radio signal can carry huge amounts of data.

The… read more

The next computer interface: your finger

August 1, 2006

The “Fingertip Digitizer,” which users wear on the tip of the index finger, can transfer to the virtual world the meaning and intent of common hand gestures, such as pointing, wagging the finger, tapping in the air or other movements that can be used to direct the actions of an electronic device, much like a mouse directs the actions of a personal computer, but with greater precision.

What’s more,… read more

The Next Generation in Human Computer Interfaces — Awesome Videos

March 9, 2009

A new generation of exciting new interfaces with the digital world is in the pipeline, including Siftables (computerized blocks you can stack and shuffle in your hands), Reactables (new way of creating and interacting with music), and mixed-reality interfaces.

The next generation of E-ink may be on cloth

May 6, 2011

E Ink is developing a displays that can be printed on materials other than paper, including cloth.

Envelopes made for e-ink could be made to be reusable, eliminating waste, by allowing for quick and easy address changes, without the need for multiple packing slips and a new envelop every time.

The next generation of threats

February 27, 2007

Advances in genetics, nanotechnology, and robotics threaten destruction even more horrific than that of atomic devices or climate change, say commentators, citing warnings by Ray Kurzweil and Bill Joy that the government’s release of the reconstructed genome of the 1918 pandemic flu virus was “extremely foolish.”

The next generation of vertical flight

March 1, 2013

VTOLXPlane1

The DARPA Tactical Technology Office is soliciting proposals on the design, development and demonstration of a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) experimental aircraft (X-Plane) with exceptional performance in vertical and cruise flight, and operational capability through transition from vertical to forward flight

Higher speeds, increased efficiency, elegant designs are the focus of DARPA’s new VTOL X-Plane.

The versatility of helicopters and other vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft… read more

The Next Hacking Frontier: Your Brain?

July 15, 2009

As neural devices such as deep brain stimulators and electrode systems for controlling prosthetic limbs become more complicated — and go wireless — some scientists say the risks of “brain hacking” should be taken seriously.

The Next Human Genome Project: Our Microbes

May 2, 2007

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is now considering a project, dubbed the human microbiome, to sequence the microorganisms that inhabit our bodies.

The project could reveal whether different organisms are correlated with different health states, and could ultimately become a routine part of medical exams, perhaps used to diagnose different diseases.

The next medical frontier: nano-surgery

December 22, 2009

Nader Jalili, an associate professor of mechanical and industrial engineering at Northeastern University, is working to create a controlled nanorobot that will be capable of performing non-invasive cancer surgery at sub-nanometer or nanometer resolution, with a degree of precision not possible through existing surgical procedures.

The nanorobots could also be used to take minute skin samples for pathological testing as well as for diagnostic purposes, or to inject medicine… read more

The next Napster? Copyright questions as 3D printing comes of age

April 7, 2011

The first formal attempt to apply copyright law to regulate content on a 3D printing repository has raised some interesting and thorny legal questions.

Imagine it’s the year 2050. You wake up groggily to the voice of your robot butler, who gently reminds you it’s your 30th anniversary. You’re dismayed to have forgotten (again), but not at all worried—while your car still doesn’t fly, you are the proud ownerread more

The Next Net

January 5, 2011

The moment the “net neutrality” debate began was the moment the net neutrality debate was lost,” says author Douglas Russkoff on Shareable.net. “For once the fate of a network — its fairness, its rule set, its capacity for social or economic reformation — is in the hands of policymakers and the corporations funding them, that network loses its power to effect change.

“I propose we abandon the… read more

The Next Small Thing

July 15, 2001

Scientists are re-creating our world in the realm of the intensely tiny. The potential payoff: denser hard drives, smaller chips, better medicine.
Top research organizations within large companies and renowned universities are inventing the future: electronics as cheap and plentiful as bar codes on packaging; lightweight vests enmeshed with sensors could measure a person’s vital signs; analysis of a patient’s DNA could be done so quickly and precisely that designer… read more

The Next Wave of Botnets Could Descend from the Skies

September 8, 2011
Flying bot

Stevens Institute of Technology researchers have demonstrated low-cost remote-controlled drones that could create and control a botnet —- a network of compromised computers — automatically detecting and compromising wireless networks.

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