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Sounds During Sleep Aid Memory, Study Finds

November 20, 2009

Playing sound cues associated with a picture in a specific location while people slept helped them remember more of what they had learned before they fell sleep, to the point where memories of individual facts were enhanced, scientists at Northwestern University report in the journal Science.

Sounds Of The Universe

May 22, 2001

Extraterrestrial acoustics and a “smart violin” attempt to clone the Stradivarius will be among the topics presented at the annual Acoustical Society of America conference, June 4-8, Palmer House Hilton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois.

Sounds Realer Than Reality

June 5, 2002

Scientists can generate imitations of real-life sounds significantly more convincing than actual recordings of the events they are intended to mimic.Experimental psychologists Laurie Heller and Lauren Wolf at Brown University found that listeners rated some artificially generated sounds — simulating “walking in leaves” by running fingers through cornflakes, for example — as more convincing than the real ones.

Enhancing the sound envelope (slower changing component) results in better perception… read more

Source of ‘optimism’ found in the brain

October 25, 2007

Using fMRI brain scans, New York University researchers have discovered two regions of the brain linked to optimism: the amygdala and the rostral anterior cingulated cortex.

The identification of the sites could shed light on the causes of depression.

Sources: Pentagon planning new cybercommand

April 23, 2009

The Pentagon is planning to create a new military command to focus on cyberspace and protect its computer networks from cyberattacks, U.S. officials said Wednesday.

South Carolina scientist works to grow meat in lab

February 1, 2011

Medical University of South Carolina scientist Vladimir Mironov, M.D., Ph.D. has been working for a decade to grow meat. He has taken myoblasts — embryonic cells that develop into muscle tissue — from turkey and bathed them in a nutrient bath of bovine serum on a scaffold made of chitosan (a common polymer found in nature) to grow animal skeletal muscle tissue.

Cultured meat could eventually become cheaper than… read more

South Korean Team Kaist wins DARPA Robotics Challenge

Top three teams awarded total of $3.5 million in prizes
June 8, 2015

Team KAIST's DRC-Hubo robot turns valve 360 degrees in DARPA Robotics Challenge Final (credit: DARPA)

First place in the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals this past weekend in Pomona, California went to Team Kaist of South Korea for its DRC-Hubo robot, winning $2 million in prize money.

Team IHMC Robotics of Pensacola, Fla., with its Running Man (Atlas) robot came in at second place ($1 million prize), followed by Tartan Rescue of Pittsburgh with its CHIMP robot ($500,000 prize).… read more

South Pole Neutrino Detector Could Yield Evidences of String Theory

January 30, 2006

Researchers at Northeastern University and the University of California, Irvine say that scientists might soon have evidence for extra dimensions and other exotic predictions of string theory. Early results from a neutrino detector at the South Pole, called AMANDA, show that ghostlike particles from space could serve as probes to a world beyond our familiar three dimensions, the research team says.

Southampton engineers build a Raspberry Pi supercomputer

September 12, 2012

raspberry_pi_supercomputer_5

Computational Engineers at the University of Southampton have built a supercomputer from 64 Raspberry Pi computers and Lego.

The machine, named “Iridis-Pi” after the University’s Iridis supercomputer, runs off a single 13 Amp mains socket and uses MPI (Message Passing Interface) to communicate between nodes using Ethernet.

The whole system cost under £2,500 (excluding switches) and… read more

Southampton research could lead to better treatments for cardiovascular disease

April 4, 2012

Artery

Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered a new process that controls the ability of arteries to constrict, which could lead to a better understanding of the causes of cardiovascular disease and the development of new treatments.

In a study funded by the British Heart Foundation, researchers showed that polyunsaturated fats, which are converted into fat-like molecules called eicosanoids in order to make arteries constrict, are… read more

Southeast Asia’s first nanomedicine research institute gets $60 million funding

November 6, 2013

NTU is the world's largest engineering university

Nanyang Technological University (NTU) is establishing the new $60 million Nanomedicine Institute@NTU to focus on applications of nanotechnology for diabetes, cardiovascular, ophthalmology, and skin therapeutics.

Set to be Southeast Asia’s first research institute in nanomedicine, the new institute will be headed by Professor Subbu Venkatraman, Chair of NTU’s School of Materials Science and Engineering, with Professor Chad Mirkin from Northwestern University as the chairman of its advisory committee.… read more

‘Space Cube’ could be world’s smallest PC

August 29, 2008

Shimafuji Corporation has developed the Space Cube, a 2×2 inches PC designed for use in space to control various electronics and manage an “interstellar computer network.”

Running on just 5 Watts, the PC has a 300 MHz CPU, 16 MB of on-board flash memory, 64MB SDRAM card, LAN port, USB port, Ethernet port, and VGA monitor connector.

Space elevator by 2050 planned, to include space solar power

February 22, 2012

space_elevator

Obayashi Corp., headquartered in Tokyo, has unveiled a project to build a space elevator by the year 2050 that would transport passengers to a station 36,000 kilometers above the Earth and transmit power to the ground.

A cable, made of carbon nanotubes, would be stretched up to 96,000 kilometers, or about one-fourth of the distance between the Earth and the moon. One end of… read more

Space elevators face wobble problem

March 31, 2008

A Czech Academy of Sciences study suggests that building and maintaining a space elevator would be an bigger challenge than previously thought, because it would need to include built-in thrusters to stabilize itself against dangerous vibrations.

Space Elevators Maybe Closer To Reality Than Imagined

July 25, 2003

The NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC) commissioned a study of the construction and operation of a space elevator and Phase I of the report was published in late 2002.

The elevator would start as a 1-micron thick piece of tape made of carbon nanotubes 91,000km long, tapering from 5cm wide at the Earth’s surface to 11.5cm wide near the middle….

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