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Superluminal Ultrasound?

November 2, 2005

The group velocity of an ultrasound wave could theoretically jump by five orders of magnitude over its ordinary values and exceed c (the speed of light), when pulses of high-frequency sound strike a mixture of water and tiny (approximately 0.1-mm diameter) plastic spheres.

‘Superman’ vision penetrates opaque glass

January 29, 2010

French scientists have transmitted simple images through opaque objects using a laser beam by reverse-engineering the scattering process.

They transmitted the laser beam more than 1000 times, changing the shape of the beam each time using a spatial light modulator. A digital camera on the other side of the glass detected the different scattering patterns produced each time. Comparing what it saw with what had been done to the… read more

Supermarket scanner recognizes objects, makes barcodes obsolete

March 12, 2012

supermarketscanner

The latest supermarket scanner developed by Toshiba Tec may make conventional barcodes in supermarkets obsolete.

Supermaterials improve solar collectors

January 21, 2015

University of Rochester Institute of Optics professor Chunlei Guo has developed a technique that uses lasers to render materials hydrophobic, illustrated in this image of a water droplet falling off a treated sample in his lab (Credit: J. Adam Fenster/University of Rochester)

By zapping ordinary metals with femtosecond laser pulses, researchers from the University of Rochester in New York have created extraordinary new surfaces that efficiently absorb light, repel water and clean themselves for use in durable, low-maintenance solar collectors and sensors, for example.

This is the first multifunctional metal surface created by lasers that is superhydrophobic (water repelling), self-cleaning, and highly absorptive,” said Chunlei Guo, a physicist… read more

Superpoison’s genetic blueprint is revealed

May 30, 2007

The C. botulinum genome has been sequenced, providing a tool against biological attack as well as the more familiar infection from food.

‘Superradiant’ discovery opens new path to superfast quantum computing

June 19, 2014

The atom trapping apparatus used to observe the physics described in the article (credit: Washington State University)

Washington State University researchers have used a super-cold cloud of atoms that behaves like a single atom, opening a new experimental path to potentially powerful quantum computing.

Physicist Peter Engels and his colleagues cooled about one million atoms of rubidium to 100 billionths of a degree above absolute zero.

There was no colder place in the universe, said Engels, unless someone was doing a similar experiment… read more

Supersonic spray creates high-quality graphene layer

Could lead to Industrial-scale applications
May 29, 2014

Supersonic spray

A simple, inexpensive spray method that deposits a graphene film can heal manufacturing defects and produce a high quality graphene layer on a range of substrates, report researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Korea University — an alternative to the chemical vapor deposition process developed by MIT and the University of Michigan for creating large sheets of graphene, recently reported by KurzweilAI.… read more

Superstruct: the world’s first massively multiplayer forecasting game

October 7, 2008

Developed by the Institute for the Future, Superstruct, the world’s first massively multiplayer forecasting game, goes live today and will last for six weeks, played on forums, blogs, videos, wikis, and other online spaces.

“By playing the game, you’ll help us chronicle the world of 2019–and imagine how we might solve the problems we’ll face,” the Web site says. “Because this is about more than… read more

Superworm To Storm The Net On 9/11

September 5, 2003

An analysis of Internet virus activity shows that on September 11th, an advanced worm attack is set to infiltrate the Internet and could potentially halt email traffic worldwide. We need to act now.

Supplement added to a standard diet improves health and prolongs life in mice

March 5, 2014

Representative photographs from blinded histopathological analysis of kidney, liver, and lung panels for mice on standard diet (SD) and SRT1720 supplementation

Activating a protein called sirtuin 1 extends lifespan, delays the onset of age-related metabolic diseases, and improves general health in mice. The findings, which appear online February 27 in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports, point to a potentially promising strategy for improving health and longevity.

Sirtuin 1, or SIRT1, is known to play an important role in maintaining metabolic balance in multiple tissues, and studies in… read more

Supplying the World’s Energy Needs with Light and Water

May 10, 2007

Understanding how photosynthesis works, thinks Daniel Nocera, professor of chemistry at MIT, could lead to ways to produce and store solar energy in forms that are practical for powering cars and providing electricity even when the sun isn’t shining.

Support cells found in human brain make mice smarter

March 8, 2013

brain_mice_human_astrocytes

Glial cells — a family of cells found in the human central nervous system and, until recently, considered mere “housekeepers” — now appear to be essential to the unique complexity of the human brain.

Scientists reached this conclusion after demonstrating that when transplanted into mice, these human cells could influence communication within the brain, allowing the animals to learn more rapidly.

The study suggests that the… read more

Support for top-down theory of how ‘buckyballs’ form

Discovery could have a bearing on medical imaging, cancer treatment
September 24, 2013

dorn_buckyballs

Researchers at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have reported the first experimental evidence that supports the theory that a soccer ball-shaped nanoparticle commonly called a buckyball is the result of a breakdown of larger structures rather than being built atom-by-atom from the ground up.

Technically known as fullerenes, these spherical carbon molecules have shown great promise for uses in medicine, solar energy, and optoelectronics.… read more

Supreme Court ruling on Affordable Care Act

June 28, 2012

supreme court

The health care act is held as constitutional as a tax, according to SCOTUSBlog.

Surface plasmons enhance nanostructure possibilities

September 19, 2007

Scientists from University College London and at the Queen’s University of Belfast have demonstrated a method of achieving ultrahigh light dispersion that makes use of surface plasmon polaritons on nanostructures.

Uses would be in such areas as quantum information processing, lab-on-chip applications for spectral analysis, chemistry and electronic engineering, and optical communications as signal processing devices.

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