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Super Water Kills Bugs Dead

May 17, 2005

A California company has figured out how to use two simple materials — water and salt — to create a solution that wipes out single-celled organisms, and which appears to speed healing of burns, wounds and diabetic ulcers.

‘Super Wi-Fi’ blankets first county in US

January 27, 2012

Super Wi-Fi logo

New Hanover County, North Carolina, recently rolled out “Super Wi-Fi,” operating in the “white spaces” between 50–700Mhz, where previously only television stations were allowed to transmit, reports Technology Review’s Mim’s Bits blog.

This could mean high-speed wireless connections for the county’s residents, and also the potential to connect to Wi-Fi towers that are miles distant (not possible with conventional Wi-Fi).

However,… read more

Super-black carbon nanotubes make spacecraft instruments more sensitive

July 23, 2013

Australia’s Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication applied a catalyst layer using atomic layer deposition to this occulter mask (credit: NASA)

A team led by John Hagopian, an optics engineer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., has demonstrated that it can grow a uniform layer of carbon nanotubes through the use of another emerging technology called atomic layer deposition or ALD.

The super-black nanotechnology that promises to make spacecraft optical instruments more sensitive without enlarging their size.

“The significance of this is that we… read more

Super-bright, fast X-ray free-electron lasers can now image single layer of proteins

Scientists to image the missing 25 percent of known proteins
February 17, 2014

xfel_structure_protein

A new method for determining a protein’s shape just one protein molecule thick, using X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL), significantly increases the number and type of proteins that researchers can study.

In biology, a protein’s shape is key to understanding how it causes disease or toxicity. Researchers who use X-rays to take snapshots of proteins need a billion copies of the same protein stacked and packed into a neat crystal.… read more

Super-Charging Lithium Batteries

January 4, 2008

Stanford University materials scientists have unveiled a silicon nanowire electrode that could more than triple lithium batteries’ energy storage capacity and improve their safety.

Existing lithium batteries can enable battery-powered electrical vehicles to travel hundreds of miles on a charge, but major automakers need to demonstrate that the batteries are safe and durable enough for mass marketing.

Super-Cheap Supercomputing?

April 3, 2003

Star Bridge Systems claims to have created a reconfigurable “hypercomputer” that performs like a supercomputer but sits on a desktop, uses very little electricity, needs no special cooling systems and costs as little as $175,000.

The secret is the use of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) chips that can be reprogrammed on the fly to handle different tasks and the development of a special programming language.

News tip: Walter… read more

Super-dense data stores cool down

September 18, 2009

A material that could allow super-dense (125 gigabytes per square inch) “millipede”-style data storage systems to work at room temperature (and thus be a viable commercial product) has been developed by researchers at Pohang University of Science and Technology in Kyungbuk, Korea.

The system uses a “baroplastic” — a hard polymer that becomes soft when placed under pressure — and the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) to… read more

Super-Eruptions Pose Global Threat ’5-10 Times More Likely Than Asteroid Impact’

April 27, 2005

A volcanic super-eruption would have severe environmental effects and might threaten global civilization. This is the assessment of a Geological Society of London working group composed of senior Earth Scientists.

Super-fast broadband coming via cable?

July 21, 2005

By using Ethernet within cable TV networks, in 2006 the speed of broadband internet over cable TV could reach 100 megabits per second, claims a Finnish technology company.

The new technique for increasing transmission speeds over cable is undergoing field trials in the Netherlands.

Super-fast Google Fiber for Kansas City

July 27, 2012

google_fiber

Google has announced Google Fiber, to be installed first in Kansas City.

Google Fiber is 100 times faster than today’s average broadband.

Imagine: instantaneous sharing; truly global education; medical appointments with 3D imaging; even new industries that we haven’t even dreamed of, powered by a gig.

Google has divided Kansas City into small communities called “fiberhoods.” To get service, each fiberhood needs a critical… read more

Super-high pressures used to create super battery

July 6, 2010

Using super-high pressures similar to those found deep in the Earth or on a giant planet, Washington State University researchers have created a compact, never-before-seen material capable of storing vast amounts of energy.

“It is the most condensed form of energy storage outside of nuclear energy,” says Choong-Shik Yoo, a WSU chemistry professor and lead author of results published in the journal Nature Chemistry. “It shows it is possible… read more

Super-nanotubes: ‘remarkable’ spray-on coating combines carbon nanotubes with ceramic

April 19, 2013

Micrograph of one strand of a new spray-on super-nanotube composite developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Kansas State University. The multi-wall nanotube core is surrounded by a ceramic shell. The composite is a promising coating for laser power detectors. (Color added for clarity.)<br />
Credit: Kansas State University

A spray-on mixture of carbon nanotubes and ceramic that has unprecedented ability to resist damage while absorbing laser light has been demonstrated by researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Kansas State University.

Coatings that absorb as much of the energy of high-powered lasers as possible without breaking down are essential for optical power detectors that measure the output… read more

‘Super-photon’ could allow for breakthrough in computer-chip performance

November 29, 2010

Artist's illustration of the "super-photon" (Jan Klaers, University of Bonn)

Physicists from the University of Bonn have developed a completely new source of light: a Bose-Einstein condensate consisting of photons.

This method could be suitable for designing novel light sources resembling lasers that work in the x-ray range. Among other applications, they might allow building more powerful computer chips. The scientists report on their discovery in the journal Nature.

By cooling Rubidium atoms deeply and concentrating a sufficient number… read more

Super-resolution atom-by-atom laser machining method allows for making nanoscale devices

March 11, 2014

Diamond-Diagram-2-No-Back-Wireframe

Australian researchers have discovered how to use laser light to pick apart a substance atom by atom, allowing for creating new nanoscale diamond devices.

“Lasers are known to be very precise at cutting and drilling materials on a small scale — less than the width of a human hair, in fact — but on the atomic scale they have notoriously poor resolution,” says lead researcher Associate Professorread more

Super-resolution electron microscopy of soft materials like biomaterials

Breakthrough technique allows for noninvasive nanoscale imaging with electron beams, bypassing optical microscopy limitations
June 5, 2015

CLAIRE image-ft

Soft matter encompasses a broad swath of materials, including liquids, polymers, gels, foam and — most importantly — biomolecules. At the heart of soft materials, governing their overall properties and capabilities, are the interactions of nano-sized components.

Observing the dynamics behind these interactions is critical to understanding key biological processes, such as protein crystallization and metabolism, and could help accelerate the development of important new technologies, such as artificial… read more

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