Recently Added Most commented

Software Being Developed to Monitor Opinions of U.S.

October 5, 2006

A consortium of major universities is developing natural language processing software that would let the government monitor negative opinions of the United States or its leaders in newspapers and other publications overseas.

The researchers have complied a database of hundreds of articles that it is being used to train a computer to recognize, rank and interpret statements.

Software detects motion that the human eye can’t see

Video technique could lead to remote diagnostic methods
July 24, 2012

eulerian_video_magnification

A new set of software algorithms can amplify aspects of a video and reveal what is normally undetectable to human eyesight, making it possible to, for example, measure someone’s pulse by shooting a video of him and capturing the way blood is flowing across his face, Technology Review reports.

The software process, called “Eulerian video magnification” by the MIT computer scientists who developed the program,… read more

Software equal to or better than humans at cataloging published science data

December 2, 2014

Computer-generated genus-level diversity curves (credit: Shanan E. Peters et al./PLOS ONE)

A computer system called PaleoDeepDive has equaled (or bested in some categories) scientists at the complex task of extracting data from scientific publications and placing it in a database that catalogs the results of tens of thousands of individual studies.

The development, described in the current issue of PLoS, marks a milestone in the quest to rapidly and precisely summarize, collate, and index the vast output of scientists… read more

Software finds learning language child’s play

July 26, 2007

A computer program that learns to decode language sounds in a way similar to a baby could shed new light on how humans acquire the ability to talk.

James McClelland, a psychology professor at Stanford University, says his computer algorithm supports the idea that babies systematically sort through sounds until they understand the structure of a language.

Software finds possible anthrax cures

March 11, 2002

Scientists, using distributed computing via a million home computers, have come up with 300,000 potential compounds that could be developed as a cure for anthrax.
The project was completed in 24 days, versus years with traditional methods, according to Graham Richards, a chemistry professor at Britain’s Oxford University who helped organize the project.

The list of drug candidates goes to the U.S. Department of Defense and Britain’s Office of… read more

Software gambler takes on the tipsters

December 12, 2002

Software developed by Australian IT researcher Alan McCabe uses a neural network to learn which features of a team’s performance make them winners. The neural network is trained with match data obtained from a national bookmaker, such as a team’s current success rate and the points scored for and against them each week.

Software generates video news bulletins

October 25, 2006

Software that automatically generates timely video news bulletins, presented by computer-animated characters, could revolutionize news broadcasting.

The system, called News at Seven, can produce reports tailored to a person’s particular interests.

Using keywords entered by the user, the program selects news site RSS feeds and specific stories to focus on. The next step is to extract further key terms from these reports and use these to search for… read more

Software Helps Develop Hunches

March 13, 2006

Eric Bonabeau, founder of Icosystem, has introduced “the hunch engine,” software designed to enhance and refine human intuition.

When the user starts the hunch engine he or she is presented with a seed — a starting point — and a set of mutations. The user selects mutations that look promising, and the application uses that selection to generate another set of mutations, continuing in that fashion until the user… read more

Software learns new words from Wikipedia

September 6, 2006

A program that works out the meaning of newly coined words using the online encyclopedia Wikipedia could help machines understand the slang used in blogs and other informal texts.

The program, called Zeitgeist, hunts through Wikipedia looking for entries about new words that do not appear in an online resource called WordNet, an official linguistics tool that is both a dictionary and a thesaurus.

Software learns to translate by reading up

February 23, 2005

Translation software that develops an understanding of languages by scanning through thousands of previously translated documents has been developed by Information Sciences Institute.

It takes a statistical approach, building probabilistic rules about words, phrases and syntactic structures.

The translated documents used to teach the translation algorithms can be electronic, on paper, or even audio files. The developer says the system is not only faster than other methods, but… read more

Software lets programmers code hands-free

April 26, 2006

VoiceCode, a new speech-recognition tool, promises to let programmers write clean code without ever having to lay a finger on their keyboard.

It has been developed to help programmers with repetitive strain injury

Software links chatbots to OpenCyc inference engine

April 19, 2004

New software called CyN allows you to talk to the OpenCyc commonsense inference engine from AIML chatbots.

A chatbot is a program with human-like personality that allows for natural-language conversations with computers. OpenCyc is the open-source version of Cyc technology, the world’s largest and most complete general knowledge base and commonsense reasoning engine. AIML (Artificial Intelligence Markup Language) is an XML type… read more

Software Out There

April 7, 2006

Blocks of interchangeable software components are proliferating on the Web and developers are joining them together to create a potentially infinite array of useful new programs.

This new software represents a marked departure from the inflexible, at times unwieldy, programs of the past, which were designed to run on individual computers.

Software paraphrases sentences

December 4, 2003

Researchers at Cornell University have combined on-line journalism and computational biology to make it possible to automatically paraphrase whole sentences. The method could eventually allow computers to more easily process natural language, produce paraphrases that could be used in machine translation, and help people who have trouble reading certain types of sentences.

The researchers’ system uses word-based clustering methods to identify sets of text that have a high degree… read more

Software predicts tomorrow’s news by analyzing today’s and yesterday’s

February 4, 2013

800px-World_newspapers_

Prototype software can give early warnings of disease or violence outbreaks by spotting clues in news reports.

Researchers have created software that predicts when and where disease outbreaks might occur, based on two decades of New York Times articles and other online data. The research comes from Microsoft and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, MIT Technology Review reports.

The system could someday help aid organizations and… read more

close and return to Home