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Superantibodies target diseases by entering cells

April 15, 2004

Superantibodies that can bind to targets within cells, rather than on their surface, could lead to a new range of treatments for diseases, InNexus Biotechnology of Vancouver claims.

Superantibodies could be used to target bacteria and viruses (including HIV) inside cells, for instance, or abnormal proteins that turn cells cancerous. In theory, they could do everything that the small molecules of most conventional drugs do, and more.

The… read more

Superbug genome sequenced

May 8, 2008

University of Bristol and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute researchers have sequenced the genome of a newly emerging superbug commonly known as Steno.

The bacteria has strains that are resistant to all available antibiotics. It flourishes in moist environments, and can form a “biofilm” on hospital catheters or ventilation tubes that protects the bacteria and makes it difficult to sterilize equipment.

Having the genome should help researchers combat these… read more

Supercapacitor “battery” could lead to instant charging, long charge life

September 5, 2007

EEStor claims to have developed a car battery based on capacitors that can be charged quickly and is ready for large-scale production.

The patent specifies charge storage that is much higher than anything achieved in an academic lab: 52 kilowatt-hours in a 2,000 cubic inch capacitor array — more than 10 times the power density of standard lead-acid batteries.

Supercapacitors from ‘crumpled graphene’ could power flexible electronic devices

October 7, 2014

To form the crumpled graphene, a sheet of polymer material is stretched in both dimensions, then graphene paper is bonded to it. When the polymer is released in one direction, the graphene forms pleats, as shown in the bottom left image, taken with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Then, when released in the other direction, it forms a chaotic crumpled pattern (top left). At top right, an SEM image shows the material in a partially crumpled state. At bottom right, SEM image of a piece that has been crumpled and then flattened out (Credit: Image courtesy of the researchers)

MIT researchers have found that crumpling a piece of graphene “paper” — a material formed by bonding together layers of the two-dimensional form of carbon — can yield new properties that could be useful for creating extremely stretchable supercapacitors to store energy for flexible electronic devices.

The finding is reported in the journal Scientific Reports (open access) by MIT’s Xuanhe Zhao, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and civil and… read more

Supercentenarian Research Foundation Plans Tissue Sampling of Supercentenarians

September 5, 2006

The Los Angeles Gerontology Research Group has created a tax-exempt Supercentenarian Research Foundation to fund tissue sampling of all living Supercentenarians (persons 110 years or older) worldwide.

The aim of the Foundation is “to develop a rigorous, statistically significant database of the most important SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) of ‘gerontic’ (longevity) genes,” said Los Angeles Gerontology Research Group Co-founder L. Stephen Coles, M.D., Ph.D.… read more

Supercharging the brain

October 28, 2004

At least 40 new potential cognitive enhancer drugs are currently in clinical development.

These breakthroughs could turn out to be lifesavers or at least postpone the development of a devastating disease such as Alzheimer’s.

But who else should be allowed to take them?

Supercomputer Breaks the $100/GFLOPS Barrier

August 25, 2003

KASY0, the first supercomputer to break $100/GFLOPS, has been assembled entirely by students at the University of Kentucky.

Supercomputer builds a virus

March 14, 2006

One of the world’s most powerful supercomputers has built a computer model of the satellite tobacco mosaic virus.

The researchers say the simulation is the first to capture a whole biological organism in such intricate molecular detail.

Running on a machine at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Urbana, the program calculated how each of the million or so atoms in the virus and a surrounding drop of… read more

Supercomputer climate model whips up a storm

October 1, 2003

Virtual hurricanes have appeared in computer models of the Earth’s climate for the first time.

The Earth Simulator in Yokohama, Japan, the world’s fastest supercomputer, can run models with cells as small as 10 kilometers, allowing for study of detailed features of the weather, such as tropical storms.

Supercomputer improves diagnosis of osteoporosis

July 3, 2008

Researchers at IBM Zurich Research Laboratory and ETH Zurich are using a Blue Gene supercomputer to simulate human bone structure and predict where bones are likely to fracture.

The research could help bring clinical tools to improve the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis, a widespread disease that worldwide affects one in three women and one in five men over the age of 50.

When running simulations for a… read more

Supercomputer is made from off-the-shelf PlayStation 3 gaming consoles

March 25, 2011

Computer scientists at the Air Force Research Lab in Rome, NY, have assembled one of the world’s largest, fastest, and cheapest supercomputers by linking together 1,716 PlayStation 3s, says Mark Barnell, director of high-performance computing at the Air Force Research Lab.

The supercomputer can scan or process text in any language at 20 pages per second, fill in missing sections it has never seen with 99.9 percent accuracy, and… read more

Supercomputer Needs Super-Big Space

September 6, 2001

Los Alamos National Labs’ new “Q” 30 teramips supercomputer requires a 300,000-square-foot building and 7 megawatts of electricity for cooling — ten percent of all the electricity piped into Los Alamos Labs and surrounding community.While today’s fastest machine can perform 10 trillion calculations a second, visionaries are thinking about machines 100 times faster.

That is probably eight or nine years away, Mike Vildibill, deputy director at San Diego Supercomputer… read more

Supercomputer on a chip

March 13, 2001

Sony Computer Entertainment, Toshiba and IBM announced today they are teaming up on a $400 million project to develop a “supercomputer-on-a-chip.”

Code-named “Cell,” the new microchips will employ the world’s most advanced chip-making techniques, including copper wires, silicon-on-insulator transistors and low-K dielectric insulation, with features smaller than 0.10 microns.

The result will be consumer devices that are more powerful than IBM’s Deep Blue supercomputer, operate at low power,… read more

Supercomputer Simulations Reveal Strongest Carbon Nanotubes

September 20, 2001

A team of researchers has used computer simulations to discover carbon fibers with mechanical strength comparable to that of diamond. In a paper published in Physical Review Letters, Crespi, graduate student Dragan Stojkovic, and recent Ph.D. graduate Peihong Zhang report that they discovered incredibly strong and stiff carbon tubes about 0.4 nanometers in diameter.

Using supercomputers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), the University of Michigan, and the… read more

Supercomputer smashes world speed record

April 18, 2002

A Japanese supercomputer has recorded the world’s fastest floating point calculation speed at 35.61 teraflops — five times faster than IBM’s ASCI White’s 7.23 teraflops.
The supercomputer is installed in The Earth Simulator at the Marine Science and Technology Center in Kanagawa. It which simulates climate change using data collected by Earth-monitoring satellites.

According to an NEC spokesman, the supercomputer was tested using the Linpack benchmarking software.… read more

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