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Spintronic logic gate promises computing advance

June 1, 2007

University of California, San Diego researchers have drawn up plans for a semiconductor-based spintronic device that performs the same logical operations as the transistors in a normal silicon chip.

They have also shown how its spintronic logic gates could be integrated into large-scale integrated circuits.

Spintronic organic LED: brighter, cheaper, environment-friendlier

Could be on the market in five years
July 16, 2012

Spin-OLED device structure

University of Utah physicists have invented a new “spintronic” organic light-emitting diode (OLED) that promises to be brighter, cheaper and more environmentally friendly than the kinds of LEDs now used in television and computer displays, lighting, traffic lights and numerous electronic devices.

The Utah physicists made a prototype of the new kind of LED — known technically as a spin-polarized organic LED or spin OLED —… read more

Spintronic speed limit defined for next generation of high-performing data-storage devices

August 30, 2012

vortex-core-350px

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have precisely measured a key parameter of electron interactions called non-adiabatic spin torque that is essential to the future development of spintronic data storage devices.

(Current data storage technology has a functional limit: magnetically stored digital information becomes unstable when too tightly packed. The denser, faster, and smarter technology of spintronics may offer a solution. Spintronic devices use electron spin to… read more

Spintronics advance brings wafer-scale quantum devices closer to reality

June 25, 2015

Light polarizes silicon nuclear spins within a silicon carbide chip. This image portrays the nuclear spin of one of the atoms shown in the full crystal lattice below. (credit: Courtesy of Peter Allen)

Researchers at the University of Chicago’s Institute for Molecular Engineering have taken a crucial step toward nuclear spintronic technologies that use the “spin” — or magnetization — of atomic nuclei to store and process information. The new technologies could be used for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging, advanced gyroscopes, and quantum computers.

The researchers used infrared light to make nuclear spins line themselves up in a consistent,… read more

‘Spintronics’ could enable a new generation of electronic devices

August 11, 2003

Theoretical physicists at Stanford and the University of Tokyo says they have discovered the equivalent of a new “Ohm’s Law” for spintronics.

”Unlike the Ohm’s Law for electronics, the new ‘Ohm’s Law’ that we’ve discovered says that the spin of the electron can be transported without any loss of energy, or dissipation,” says Shoucheng Zhang, a physics professor at Stanford. “Furthermore, this effect occurs at room temperature in materials… read more

Spintronics may save Moore’s Law

March 10, 2006

The Western Institute of Nanoelectronics is being established with grants of $18.2 million, largely from semiconductor companies with an interest in breakthroughs in spintronics, which holds promise in minimizing power consumption for next-generation consumer electronics.

Spiraling nanotrees offer new twist on growth of nanowires

May 2, 2008

University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have discovered a new way of growing nanowires that leads to “nanopines”–elaborate pine-tree-shaped nanowires–caused by a “screw” dislocation, or defect, in their crystal structure.

Dislocations are fundamental to the growth and characteristics of all crystalline materials, but this is the first time they’ve been shown to aid the growth of one-dimensional nanostructures.

Engineering these dislocations may allow scientists to create more elaborate nanostructures, and… read more

Spleen may be source of versatile stem cells

January 20, 2005

Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have found further evidence that the spleen might be a source of adult stem cells.

Previously the researchers found evidence that splenic stem cells existed and could regenerate the insulin-producing islets of the pancreas. In a follow-up study, they now report that these potential adult stem cells produce a protein previously believed to be present only during the embryonic development of mammals. The finding both… read more

Splice It Yourself

May 12, 2005

The advent of garage biology is at hand. Skills and technology are proliferating, and the synthesis and manipulation of genomes are no longer confined to ivory towers.

The technology has even reached the toy market: The Discovery DNA Explorer kit for kids 10 and older is surprisingly functional at $80.

Spoiler alert: Your TV will be hacked

April 19, 2012

(Credit: iStockphoto)

Last week you may have read a headline that blared “100 million TVs will be Web-connected by 2016.” So will Internet TVs will be hacked as successfully as previous generations of digital devices?

“Of course they will,” says security advisor Roger Grimes, who has successfully hacked Internet-connected TVs. “Nothing in a computer built into a TV makes it less attackable than a PC. Internet-connected TVs have IP… read more

Sponge’s secret weapon restores antibiotics’ power

February 17, 2009

Algeferin, a chemical from an ocean sponge, can reprogram antibiotic resistant bacteria to make them vulnerable to medicines again, new evidence from Hollings Marine Laboratory research suggests.

Spontaneous Assembly: A New Look At How Proteins Assemble And Organize Themselves Into Complex Patterns

July 9, 2009
PALM composite of an E.coli bacterial cell shows the organization of proteins in the chemotaxis signaling network (DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

The chemotaxis network of signaling proteins in E.coli bacteria is able to spontaneously form from clusters of proteins in complex pattterns in “stochastic self-assembly,” a team of researchers has found, using an ultrahigh-precision visible light microscopy technique called PALM (Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy).

Signaling proteins direct the movement of the bacteria towards or away from sugars, amino acids, and many other soluble molecules in response to environmental cues.… read more

‘Spooky action at a distance’ to be tested aboard the ISS

April 11, 2013

International Space Station (credit: NASA)

Researchers at the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information in Austria and the European Space Agency have proposed using the International Space Station (ISS) to test the limits of “spooky action at a distance” (remote quantum entanglement) and potentially help to develop the first global quantum communication network.

Albert Einstein famously described quantum entanglement as “spooky action at distance”; however, up until now, experiments… read more

Spooky alignment of quasar axes across billions of light-years with large-scale structure

November 21, 2014

This artist's impression shows schematically the mysterious alignments between the spin axes of quasars and the large-scale structures that they inhabit that observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope have revealed. These alignments are over billions of light-years and are the largest known in the Universe. The large-scale structure is shown in blue and quasars are marked in white with the rotation axes of their black holes indicated with a line around them. This picture is for illustration only and does not depict the real distribution of galaxies and quasars. (Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser)

New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample of quasars are parallel to each other over distances of billions of light-years. The team has also found that the rotation axes of these quasars tend to… read more

Spooky steps to a quantum network

October 5, 2006

Quantum entanglement, a strange property that links particles however far apart they are, may be used to “teleport” information.

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