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Study: Internet could run out of capacity in two years

November 20, 2007

A flood of new video and other Web content could overwhelm the Internet by 2010 unless backbone providers invest up to US$137 billion in new capacity, more than double what service providers plan to invest, according to a study by Nemertes Research Group.

Internet users will create 161 exabytes (quintillion bytes) of new data this year, they said.

The study is the first to “apply Moore’s Law (or… read more

Study: Low-carb diet best for weight, cholesterol

July 17, 2008

A low-carb diet and a Mediterranean-style regimen helped people lose more weight than a traditional low-fat diet in one of the longest and largest studies to compare the dueling weight-loss techniques.

The study was conducted by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and will be published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The low-fat diet — no more than 30 percent of calories from fat… read more

Study: Nanoelectronics market to reach $75B by 2014

April 22, 2004

“Nanotechnology: Impact of Nanotechnology on the U.S. Electronics Industry” predicts the nanoelectronics market will grow more than 45 percent during the next 10 years to more than $75 billion.

The study divides the market into first-generation products, which include nanotubes and nanowires, expected to emerge within the decade,; and second-generation, which includes molecular electronics, quantum computing and self-assembled electronic devices, which will not emerge for at least 10 years.

Study: Self-replicating nanomachines feasible

June 4, 2004

A useful self-replicating machine could be less complex than a Pentium IV chip, according to a new study of of “kinematic cellular automata” performed by General Dynamics for NASA.

Through simulations, the researchers demonstrated the feasibility of this kind of self-replication, which could in a decade or more lead to the mass manufacture of molecularly precise robots, display monitors and integrated circuits that can be programmed in the field,… read more

Studying altered brain cells sheds light on epilepsy

April 26, 2010

Changes in reactive astrocyte cells in the brain can profoundly reduce inhibitory control over brain signals, neuroscience researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Tufts University School of Medicine have found.

The researchers were able to dampen neuronal excitability in the animals’ brain slices by adding glutamine, an amino acid that is depleted as a result of reduced glutamine synthetase activity.

“We already know that inhibition is a… read more

Studying child-mother interactions to design robots with social skills

October 29, 2010

University of Miami (UM) developmental psychologists and computer scientists from the University of California in San Diego (UC San Diego) are studying infant-mother interactions and working to implement their findings in a baby robot capable of learning social skills. The objectives are to help unravel the mysteries of human cognitive development and reach new the frontiers in robotics.

The first phase of the project was studying face-to-face interactions between… read more

Studying ethical questions as the brain’s black box Is unlocked

Excerpt from The New York Times
December 18, 2012

MRI Head

S. Matthew Liao, director of the bioethics program at New York University, has a singular title: neuroethicist.

Some researchers claim to be near to using fMRIs to read thoughts. Is this really happening?

The technology, though still crude, appears to be getting closer. For instance, there’s one research group that asks subjects to watch movies. When they

read more

Studying Extreme Genomes

May 12, 2009

As genetic technologies have improved, so has the scope of investigations of human outliers–people with extreme phenotypes, thanks to rapid advances in DNA sequencing.

Scientists are now beginning to sequence individuals’ entire exome–the gene coding region of the genome–searching for mutations in genes never suspected to play a role in particular diseases.

Studying the brain’s chemistry, neuron by neuron

September 1, 2005

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers have developed tools for studying the chemistry of the brain, neuron by neuron. The analytical techniques can probe the spatial and temporal distribution of biologically important molecules, such as vitamin E, and explore the chemical messengers behind thought, memory and emotion.

By dismantling a slice of brain tissue into millions of single cell-size pieces, each of which can be interrogated by mass spectrometric… read more

Studying Young Minds, and How to Teach Them

December 21, 2009

Recent research in cognitive neuroscience is helping to clarify when young brains are best able to grasp fundamental concepts and how to teach it more effectively.

Studying, recreating sound in three dimensions

December 6, 2001

Realistic computer sound, specifically tuned for each listener, could get a little closer using a new, free public database of acoustic measurements developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis.
“We’ve captured the critical information needed to reproduce actual sounds as each listener perceives them,” said Ralph Algazi, who led the research team at the UC Davis Center for Image Processing and Integrated Computing (CIPIC).

Spatially realistic sound… read more

Stuff of Life (but Not Life Itself) Is Detected on a Distant Planet

March 20, 2008

Astronomers reported Wednesday that they had made the first detection of an organic molecule, methane, in the atmosphere of a planet outside our solar system and had confirmed the presence of water there, clearing the way for a bright future of inspecting the galaxy for livable planets, for the chemical stuff of life, or even for life itself.

Stumped by a problem? The ‘generic parts technique’ technique unsticks you

March 8, 2012


University of Massachusetts psychologist Dr. Tony McCaffrey has developed a systematic way of overcoming “functional fixedness” (the tendency to fixate on the common use of an object or its parts, hindering people from solving problems). He calls it the “generic parts technique” (GPT).

He found that people trained in GPT solved eight problems 67 percent more often than those who weren’t trained, and the trained group… read more

Stun guns can result in sudden cardiac arrest and death: cardiologist

May 3, 2012


A review of case reports published April 30 in the journal Circulation indicates that being shocked in the chest with an electronic control device or stun gun can result in sudden cardiac arrest.

The article is reportedly the first one published in a peer-reviewed medical journal citing the connection.

“Law enforcement and other individuals using a stun gun need to be aware that cardiac arrest can… read more

Stuxnet: computer worm opens new era of warfare

March 5, 2012


Could future malware, modeled on Stuxnet (whose target appears to have been the centrifuges in a top-secret Iranian nuclear facility) target other critical infrastructures — such as nuclear power plants or water systems?

What kind of risk do we face in this country? Steve Kroft reports on 60 Minutes.

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