Recently Added Most commented

3D-printed circuit boards for solder-free printable electronics

May 7, 2012

solder_free_electronics

Given the schematic for a simple circuit, here’s how to make it a real circuit with the base components, some conductive thread, and a 3D printer — no solder, no etching chemicals, no sending away for anything, Instructables explains in a how-to tutorial.

“We are entering an age where physical goods increasingly have a digital representation (e.g., www.thingiverse.com) — and the means of production of such goods are… read more

Study finds new nanomaterial could be breakthrough for implantable medical devices

November 11, 2008

Nanoporous ceramic membranes may create an interface between human tissues and medical devices that is free of protein buildup, leading to new dialysis devices and other revolutionary medical implants, a new study led by North Carolina State University has found.

Stimulating Nerve Cells with Infrared Lasers

October 27, 2004

Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered a method that uses laser light, rather than electricity, to stimulate and control neurons.

They discovered in an experiment with rats that low-intensity infrared laser light can activate specific nerves, exciting a leg or even individual toes without actually touching the neurons. Immediately following the experiment, the rats regained full use of their legs with no signs of weakness or damage.… read more

Light At the End of the Silicon

March 8, 2001

British scientists have discovered a way to make microchips smaller and faster by creating light-emitting regions in the silicon. “The power of chips doubles every few years but that will stop happening soon, because as you make them smaller the complexity of the contacts and wire that connects them doesn’t scale — it stays the same,” said Kevin Homewood, a professor of optoelectronics at the University of Surrey. The achievement,… read more

Assessing brain function in unconscious, brain-injured patients

May 14, 2012

MRI Head

New functional and imaging-based diagnostic tests that measure communication and signaling between different brain regions may provide valuable information about consciousness in patients unable to communicate.

The new tests, described in an open-access survey article, are functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with electroencephalograpy (EEG), and response to neuronal perturbation, measuring, for example, sensory evoked potentials (ERP).

Disorders of consciousness such as coma… read more

How to embed photos and videos in your video

November 17, 2008

Stanford University AI researchers have developed software that allows anyone to insert a video or still photo on almost any planar surface in an existing video.

A “3D Surface Tracker Technology” algorithm first analyzes the video, with special attention paid to the section of the scene where the new image will be placed. The color, texture and lighting of the new image are subtly altered to blend… read more

Deceptive robots hint at machine self-awareness

September 24, 2010

A robot that tricks its opponent in a game of hide and seek is a step towards machines that can intuit our thoughts, intentions and feelings.

New graphene treatment could unleash new uses in electronic devices

MIT team develops simple, inexpensive method that could help realize graphene’s promise for electronics, solar power, and sensors.
December 17, 2013

graphene_oxide_annealing

A team of researchers at MIT and the University of California at Berkeley has found a simple, inexpensive treatment that may help to unleash graphene’s potential. Currently, many suggested uses of graphene require treatments that can be expensive and difficult to apply predictably.

The new method is described in a paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, co-authored by MIT doctoral students Priyank Kumar and Neelkanth Bardhan,… read more

Super Searches

November 5, 2004

IBM Almaden Research Center has developed a next-generation search technology, called WebFountain, that lets users ask specific questions in complete sentences — something today’s search engines have trouble handling.

WebFountain can whittle down billions of pages of unstructured data from the entire Web in real time, rapidly retrieving and analyzing only the most relevant pages. Geared for corporate applications, WebFountain spots online trends as they emerge, identifies patterns –… read more

Liver on a Chip

April 4, 2001

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have created silicon chips that support fully functioning liver cells.

“We’re exploring a new generation of devices in which we can maintain cells by controlling the architecture, temperature and chemical environment, and in which we can use sensors located on the same chip to monitor the health of cells,” says Sangeeta N. Bhatia, a physician and an assistant… read more

Cognitive software captures experts’ performance on flight simulators

May 18, 2012

Debrief Tool With Automated Event Flagging. The debrief tool used in the experiment displays a video replay of the operator console (similar to this map display), and a timeline of events suggested by AEMASE for discussion during debrief. The tool also includes visualizations of entity movement over time. (Credit: S. M. Stevens-Adams et al.)

Navy pilots and other flight specialists soon will have a new “smart machine” installed in training simulators that learns from expert instructors to more efficiently train their students.

Sandia National Laboratories’ Automated Expert Modeling & Student Evaluation (AEMASE, pronounced “amaze”) is being provided to the Navy as a component of flight simulators.

Components are now being used to train Navy personnel to fly H-60 helicopters and… read more

Laying Down the Law: Q&A with Gordon Moore

April 12, 2001

Intel cofounder Gordon Moore, who coined Moore’s Law (the number of transistors that can be packed into an integrated circuit will double every year), believes this doubling will slow down sometime between 2010 and 2020. He doesn’t see a solution in the works.

In the meantime, what should we do with this increased power? “The one capability that to me will make a qualitative difference in how we do… read more

Invention: Personal life mapper

November 24, 2008

University of Massachusetts researchers have patented “personal information maps” that cluster related documents and information, and superimpose the results on relevant background images or 3D objects in a manner akin to how our minds store and organize information.

How to Hack the Power Grid for Fun and Profit

October 7, 2010

The power grid is vulnerable to manipulation or sabotage, according to a study revealed this week.

Attackers could manipulate power-grid data by breaking into substations and intercepting communications between substations, grid operators, and electricity suppliers. This data is used by grid operators to set prices for electricity and to balance supply and demand, the researchers say. Grid hackers could make millions of dollars at the expense of electricity consumers… read more

Open collaboration leading to novel organizations

January 6, 2014

bitcoin

Open collaboration — which has brought the world Bitcoin, TEDx and Wikipedia — is likely to lead to new organizations that are not quite non-profits and not quite corporations, according to a paper by Sheen S. Levine of Columbia University and Michael J. Prietula of Emory University published in the journal Organization Science.

The authors define open collaboration as “any system of innovation or production that relies on goal-oriented yet… read more

close and return to Home