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Brain scanner predicts your future moves

April 14, 2008

Researchers have measured brain activity 7 seconds before they carried out the associated task (pressing a specific button).

By deciphering the fMRI brain signals with a computer program, the researchers could predict which button a subject had pressed about 60% of the time.

Brain scan reveals memories of where you’ve been

March 13, 2009

Functional MRI scans of the hippocampus (responsible for memory) have for the first time been used to detect a person’s location in a virtual environment.

The finding suggests that more detailed mind-reading, such as detecting memories of a summer holiday, might eventually be possible, says Eleanor Maguire, a neuroscientist at University College London.

Brain rhythm associated with learning linked to running speed

June 28, 2011

Rhythms in the brain that are associated with learning become stronger as the body moves faster, neurophysicists at the University of California, Los Angeles, have found.

The experiment was performed by measuring electrical signals from hundreds of mice neurons using microwires, the researchers said. Nearly a hundred gigabytes of data was collected every day.

Analysis of the data showed that the gamma rhythm, a… read more

Brain rewiring during learning boosted by drug

July 7, 2003

The the sense of touch can be significantly enhanced by cortical remapping using stimulant drugs, researchers at Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany have found.

The findings could help to restore touch sensation in the elderly or injured and lead to treatments for some forms of chronic pain associated with distortions of the brain’s body map.

Brain rewires itself after damage or injury, life scientists discover

May 17, 2013

connectome_brain_wiring

When the hippocampus, the brain’s primary learning and memory center, is damaged, complex new neural circuits — often far from the damaged site — arise to compensate for the lost function, say life scientists from UCLA and Australia who have pinpointed the regions of the brain involved in creating those alternate pathways.

The researchers found that parts of the prefrontal cortex take over when the hippocampus is… read more

Brain responses to androids in the ‘uncanny valley’

July 15, 2011

uncanny android

In an in-depth study of the “uncanny valley” phenomenon, an international team of researchers led by the University of California, San Diego has imaged the brains of people viewing videos of an “uncanny” android (compared to videos of a human and a robot-looking robot).

The term “uncanny valley” refers to an artificial agent’s (such as a robot) drop in likeability when it becomes too humanlike.… read more

Brain Researchers Open Door to Editing Memory

April 6, 2009

SUNY Downstate Medical Center neuroscientists have discovered that a single dose of an experimental drug delivered to areas of the brain critical for holding specific types of memory (like emotional associations or spatial knowledge) blocks the activity of a substance, PKMzeta, that the brain apparently needs to retain much of its learned information.

The possibility of memory editing has enormous possibilities, but raises huge ethical issues.

Brain research? Pay it no mind

September 7, 2004

The human brain is so complex it simply defies the same kind of analysis that scientists devote to subatomic particles or human immune systems.

Brain Region That Can Be Stimulated To Reduce The Cognitive Deficits Of Sleep Deprivation Identified

February 8, 2008

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have reduced the deficits in working memory associated with extended sleep deprivation by using transcranial magnetic stimulation on the left lateral occipital cortex.

Brain reconstruction hints at ‘hobbit’ intelligence

March 4, 2005

Analysis of the diminutive cranium of Homo floresiensis – a one-meter-tall hobbit-like human that lived in Indonesia just 13,000 years ago – confirms it as a unique species and that it has advanced morphological features, including ones associated with complex brain processes in living humans.

Brain quirk could help explain financial crisis

March 25, 2009

The normal mechanisms people use to evaluate risk and reward are not being used when you have an expert telling you what to do, Gregory Berns, a neuroeconomist at Emory University, and his team found in brain imaging studies.

Brain protein critical to movement, memory, and learning deciphered at the Advanced Light Source

January 25, 2010

Brain protein

The complete atomic-level architecture of the nervous system’s glutamate receptor protein has been fully mapped for the first time using Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Advanced Light Source.

This much-anticipated milestone could lead to new treatments for neurological diseases and a better understanding of how the nervous system controls movement, memory, and learning.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORBH7jBWz7g

Brain protein critical to movement, memory, and learning deciphered at the Advanced Light Source

January 25, 2010

The complete atomic-level architecture of the nervous system’s glutamate receptor protein has been fully mapped for the first time using Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Advanced Light Source.

(Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

This much-anticipated milestone could lead to new treatments for neurological diseases and a better understanding of how the nervous system controls movement, memory, and learning.

Brain power focused on future-tech quest

January 10, 2007

America’s big names in engineering, as well as millions of Internet users around the world, are being asked to weigh in with their picks for the greatest technological challenges of the next century — a nine-month process that could give birth to new research initiatives.

The National Academy of Engineering project, called the “Grand Challenges for Engineering” program, is aimed at gathering up all those ideas and distilling them… read more

Brain Power

May 3, 2006

The Classification System for Serial Criminal Patterns (CSSCP) combs through police department IT systems, searching for patterns or clusters of data elements that might tie together a string of crimes and give police the data they need to find the perpetrators, derived from analysis of the most successful detectives in Chicago.

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