Most Recently Added Most commentedBy Title | A-Z

Would you give up your immortality to ensure the success of a posthuman world?

July 30, 2007

On Wednesday at TransVision 2007, Marvin Minsky puckishly suggested we could solve any population problem by uploading the minds of 10 billion people and running them on a computer that occupies a few cubic meters and costs only a few hundred dollars to run.

Ray Kurzweil claimed that longevity trends are accelerating so fast that the life expectancy will increase more than one year for each year… read more

Light-speed nanotech: Controlling the nature of graphene

January 22, 2009
(Rensselaer/Shemella)

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have discovered a new method for controlling the nature of graphene, bringing academia and industry potentially one step closer to realizing the mass production of graphene-based nanoelectronics.

Pro-WikiLeaks cyber army gains strength; thousands join DDoS attacks

December 10, 2010

The retaliatory attacks by pro-WikiLeaks activists are growing in strength as hackers add botnets and thousands of people download an open-source attack tool, security researchers said today.

n recent days, distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks have been launched against several sites, including those belonging to Amazon,MasterCard, PayPal and the Swiss payment transaction firm PostFinance, after each terminated WikiLeaks accounts or pulled the plug on services.

In a new step… read more

Cancer Nanotechnology Research Center Funded

October 8, 2004

The NIH has awarded two universities grants totaling nearly $10 million to establish a multidisciplinary research program in cancer nanotechnology and develop a new class of nanoparticles for molecular and cellular imaging.

One grant will establish a multidisciplinary Bioengineering Research Partnership for scientists from Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology. The other grant will be used to develop advanced nanoparticle quantum dot probes for molecular and cellular… read more

Side-to-side shaking of nanoresonators throws off impurities

August 8, 2007

Tiny vibrating silicon resonators are of intense interest in nanotechnology circles for their potential ability to detect bacteria, viruses, DNA and other biological molecules.

Cornell researchers have demonstrated a new way to make these resonators vibrate side to side and have shown that this can serve a vital function: shaking off extraneous stuff that isn’t supposed to be detected.

Improved optical brain-scanning tech rivals fMRI and PET without the risks

May 28, 2014

Research participant Britt Gott wears a cap used to image the brain via diffuse optical tomography (DOT)

Washington University School of Medicine researchers have developed a new form of brain-scanning technology that improves on diffuse optical tomography (DOT).

The new technology now allows researchers to image brain processes taking place in multiple regions and brain networks such as those involved in language processing and self-reflection (daydreaming). DOT was previously limited to small regions of the brain.

DOT avoids the radiation exposure of positron… read more

Amazon Kindle E-Book Reader To Get Facelift

January 29, 2009

Amazon is expected to unveil a new version of its Kindle e-book reader in less than two weeks.

‘Energy Blocker’ Kills Big Tumors in Rats

October 20, 2004

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that an apparently nontoxic cellular “energy blocker” can eradicate large liver tumors grown in rats.

The chemical, 3-bromopyruvate, blocks cancer cells’ conversion of sugar into usable energy, a process necessary to fuel the cells’ functions and growth, but appears so far to have little or no effect on normal tissues. Clinical trials are not likely for several years.

Johns Hopkinsread more

Did Life Begin In Space? New Evidence From Comets

August 15, 2007

Recent probes inside comets show it is overwhelmingly likely that life began in space, according to a new paper by Cardiff University Centre for Astrobiology scientists.

They suggest that radioactive elements can keep water in liquid form in comet interiors for millions of years, making them potentially ideal “incubators” for early life. They also point out that the billions of comets in our solar system and across the galaxy… read more

How to turn artwork and crafts into robots

July 11, 2012

Hummingbird controller

Almost anything that can be made with paper, paint and cardboard can be animated with an educational robotics kit developed at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute.

No technical experience is necessary to use the kit, but classroom teachers say it fosters interest in technology among students ages 11 and up.

The kit, called Hummingbird, consists of a customized control board along with a variety of lights,… read more

Why do the majority of people never get cancer?

February 4, 2009

George Klein, Professor Emeritus at the Microbiology and Tumor Biology Center at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, has presented evidence of several biological cancer resistance mechanisms that some individuals have that seem to prevent them from developing cancer.

Facebook, PayPal tycoon embraces sci-fi future

December 27, 2010

As venture capital in Silicon Valley chases the next big mobile app or group discount service, Peter Thiel is asking for them to fund technological breakthroughs that some believe in fervently and others see as sheer fantasy.

He even has a name for it: Breakthrough philanthropy.

Instead of just giving to help the less fortunate here and now, Thiel encouraged his fellow moguls to put their money toward… read more

The Other Exponentials

October 26, 2004

There are other significant exponentials in IT besides Moore’s law and they suggest opportunities for new research and new business models, says Rodney Brooks.

For example, today’s iPod could store 20,000 books. But just 10 years from now, an iPod might be able to hold 20 million books. By 2017, you’ll be able to carry around the complete text for all the volumes in the Library of Congress.… read more

Sleights of Mind

August 22, 2007

Some magicians have intuitively mastered some of the lessons being learned in the laboratory about the limits of cognition and attention.

In Las Vegas, cognitive scientists such as Daniel Dennett and magicians like The Amazing Randi compare notes.

An electronic switch just three atoms thick

July 2, 2014

In the top panel, this three-atom thick crystal is shown as semiconductor that is non-conductive. An outward tug on the material (shown in the middle panel) clicks the crystal into a metallic, or conductive state. The third panel shows the crystal back in a non-conductive state. (Credit, Karel-Alexander Duerloo)

Three Stanford researchers have discovered a flexible, switchable material that can form a paper-like sheet just three atoms thick and  behave like a switch.

As noted in articles on KurzweilAI, there’s a lot of interest in developing electronic devices based on such materials, which could enable a cell phone to be woven into a shirt, for example.

The new Stanford material can be mechanically pulledread more

close and return to Home