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Terahertz video transfer is foretaste of future wireless

March 20, 2008

Video footage has been transmitted experimentally (22 meters) using a terahertz wireless signal for the first time, by Terahertz Communications Lab in Braunschweig, Germany.

Using terahertz bandwidth — which ranges from 300GHz to 3 terahertz (THz) — could offer a 1000 fold increase in transmission speed and should open up new frequencies for communication. The as yet untapped terahertz band of the electromagnetic spectrum lies between microwaves and visible… read more

Terahertz waveguides are step toward superfast computers

April 15, 2008

Taking an early step toward building superfast computers that run on terahertz waves instead of electricity, University of Utah engineers have developed waveguides that allow for carrying, splitting, and coupling terahertz signals.

The next step is to make devices, such as switches, transistors, and modulators, that operate at terahertz frequencies.

Source: Getting wired for terahertz computing

‘Terminator’ polymer regenerates itself

September 16, 2013

T-1000 terminator

Scientists have developed the first self-healing polymer that can spontaneously achieve healing in the absence of a catalyst.

Self-healing polymers have been able to mend themselves by reforming broken cross-linking bonds, but that requires an external catalyst (trigger) to promote bond repair, such as heat, light, or specific environmental conditions, such as pH.

Ibon Odriozola at the CIDETEC Centre for Electrochemical Technologies in Spain used a poly(urea–urethane)… read more

TerminatorBot CRAWLER Gives Danger Two-Fingered Salute

August 17, 2005

The DARPA-funded TerminatorBot CRAWLER (Cylindrical Robot for Autonomous Walking and Lifting during Emergency Response) was consciously modeled on the Terminator robot in its final throes of the first movie.

In the film, the original Terminator is reduced to dragging itself forward with just two digits of its robotic hand, having been blown in half minutes earlier.

One of the key features of the robot is the usefulness of… read more

‘Terragrid’ of supercomputers planned

August 10, 2001

Four U.S. supercomputer centers will be linked together into one massive “grid” style computer next summer.

The “TerraGrid” will rival the most powerful computers in the world, and be able to process over 11 trillion commands per second. It will be 16 times more powerful than the next-fastest research network.

“This will transform the way science and research is done,” Dan Reed, director of the National Center for… read more

Terrorism Lends Urgency to Hunt for a Better Lie Detector

December 17, 2003

A near-infrared light can detect lies as they form in the brain of volunteers. It may replace the often-inaccurate polygraph to detect lies told by spies, saboteurs and terrorists.

Terrorists could use internet to launch nuclear attack: report

July 28, 2009

Terrorist groups could soon break into computer systems and set off a devastating nuclear attack, according to a study commissioned by the International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament.

Cyber-terrorists could also provoke a nuclear launch by spoofing early warning and identification systems or by degrading communications networks.

Tesco tests spy chip technology

July 21, 2003

Supermarket chain Tesco has admitted testing controversial technology that tracks customers buying certain products through its stores.

RFID tags in razor blades trigger a CCTV camera when a packet is removed from the shelf. A second camera takes a picture at the checkout and security staff then compare the two images, raising the possibility that they could be used to prevent theft.

Tesla plans ‘mostly autonomous’ car within three years

September 20, 2013

model-s-sigred-front3qtr_960x640_0

Elon Musk has decided that the next step for Tesla Motors cars is to go (mostly) autonomous, IEEE Spectrum reports.

From the Financial Times:
“We should be able to do 90 percent of miles driven within three years,” [Musk] said. Mr Musk would not reveal further details of Tesla’s autonomy project, but said it was “internal development” rather than technology being supplied by another company.read more

Tesla plans self-driving ‘autopilot’ Model S feature via software update this summer

Car is "sophisticated computer on wheels," says Musk
March 19, 2015

Model S (credit: Tesla Motors)

A software update will give Tesla Model S cars the ability to start driving themselves in “autopilot” mode on “major roads” like highways this summer, Tesla Motors chief executive Elon Musk announced today (March 19).

He also said Tesla had been testing its autopilot mode on a route from San Francisco to Seattle, largely unassisted, and that the cars will be able to park themselves in a private garage… read more

Tesla unveils groundbreaking electric car

March 30, 2009

Tesla Motors Chairman and CEO Elon Musk has introduced the new Tesla Model S all-electric sedan, saying the state-of-the-art, five-seat sedan will be the world’s first mass-produced, highway-capable electric car.

The futuristic zero-emission vehicle will be powered by lithium-ion battery packs capable of traveling between 160 and 300 miles per charge.

Test Tube Meat Nears Dinner Table

June 27, 2006

Researchers are developing lab methods of creating edible, lab-grown meat that smells and tastes just like the real thing.

Test tube method analyzes and reconstitutes DNA-repair mechanism

December 15, 2004

One of five known DNA-repair mechanisms in cells has been completely analyzed and reconstituted in a test tube by an international collaboration of researchers led by scientists from the Keck School of Medicine.

The team is the first to reconstitute this pathway, known as the nonhomologous end joining pathway, or NHEJ, and NHEJ is only the third repair pathway to be reconstituted in the laboratory.

The ability to… read more

TESTING DARWIN

February 14, 2005

After more than a decade of development, Avida’s digital organisms at Michigan State University are now getting close to fulfilling the definition of biological life.

These are digital organisms — strings of commands — akin to computer viruses. Each organism can produce tens of thousands of copies of itself within a matter of minutes. Unlike computer viruses, however, they are made up of digital bits that can mutate and… read more

Testing Drugs with Stem Cells

December 13, 2007

University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have developed a novel way to test drug toxicity by monitoring the behavior of embryonic stem cells exposed to a drug-candidate compound.

Testing the toxicity of pharmaceutical candidates in lab rats before the compounds are judged safe enough for human clinical trials is notoriously unreliable. Often compounds that appear safe in the rodents prove to be toxic in humans.

Studying how potential drugs affect… read more

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