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Brain research? Pay it no mind

September 7, 2004

The human brain is so complex it simply defies the same kind of analysis that scientists devote to subatomic particles or human immune systems.

Brain Region That Can Be Stimulated To Reduce The Cognitive Deficits Of Sleep Deprivation Identified

February 8, 2008

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have reduced the deficits in working memory associated with extended sleep deprivation by using transcranial magnetic stimulation on the left lateral occipital cortex.

Brain reconstruction hints at ‘hobbit’ intelligence

March 4, 2005

Analysis of the diminutive cranium of Homo floresiensis – a one-meter-tall hobbit-like human that lived in Indonesia just 13,000 years ago – confirms it as a unique species and that it has advanced morphological features, including ones associated with complex brain processes in living humans.

Brain quirk could help explain financial crisis

March 25, 2009

The normal mechanisms people use to evaluate risk and reward are not being used when you have an expert telling you what to do, Gregory Berns, a neuroeconomist at Emory University, and his team found in brain imaging studies.

Brain protein critical to movement, memory, and learning deciphered at the Advanced Light Source

January 25, 2010

Brain protein

The complete atomic-level architecture of the nervous system’s glutamate receptor protein has been fully mapped for the first time using Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Advanced Light Source.

This much-anticipated milestone could lead to new treatments for neurological diseases and a better understanding of how the nervous system controls movement, memory, and learning.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORBH7jBWz7g

Brain protein critical to movement, memory, and learning deciphered at the Advanced Light Source

January 25, 2010

The complete atomic-level architecture of the nervous system’s glutamate receptor protein has been fully mapped for the first time using Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Advanced Light Source.

(Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

This much-anticipated milestone could lead to new treatments for neurological diseases and a better understanding of how the nervous system controls movement, memory, and learning.

Brain power focused on future-tech quest

January 10, 2007

America’s big names in engineering, as well as millions of Internet users around the world, are being asked to weigh in with their picks for the greatest technological challenges of the next century — a nine-month process that could give birth to new research initiatives.

The National Academy of Engineering project, called the “Grand Challenges for Engineering” program, is aimed at gathering up all those ideas and distilling them… read more

Brain Power

May 3, 2006

The Classification System for Serial Criminal Patterns (CSSCP) combs through police department IT systems, searching for patterns or clusters of data elements that might tie together a string of crimes and give police the data they need to find the perpetrators, derived from analysis of the most successful detectives in Chicago.

Brain parasite alters brain chemistry, generating dopamine

November 7, 2011

Infection by the brain parasite Toxoplasma gondii, found in 10-20 per cent of the UK’s population, directly affects the production of dopamine, a key chemical messenger in the brain, a research group from the University of Leeds has found.

Dopamine controls the brain’s reward and pleasure centers and regulates emotional responses such as fear. The presence of a certain kind of dopamine receptor is also… read more

Brain on a chip?

March 17, 2009

European researchers are building a neuromorphic computer that will work similar to the brain, at smaller scale.

The first effort is a network of 300 artificial neurons and half a million “synapses” on a single chip.

Brain ‘noise’ found to nurture synapses

May 8, 2014

McCabe-CUMC-image-brain-noise

A long-overlooked form of neuron-to-neuron communication called “miniature neurotransmission” plays an essential role in the development of synapses, a study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) has shown.

The findings, made in fruit flies, raise the possibility that abnormalities in miniature neurotransmission may contribute to neurodevelopmental diseases. The findings were published in the journal Neuron.

The primary way in which neurons communicate with each… read more

Brain network related to intelligence identified

September 12, 2007

Richard Haier of the University of California, Irvine and Rex Jung of the University of New Mexico have uncovered evidence of a distinct neurobiology of human intelligence.

Their Parieto-Frontal Integration Theory (P-FIT) identifies a brain network related to intelligence, one that primarily involves areas in the frontal and the parietal lobes.

The data suggest that some of the brain areas related to intelligence are the same areas related… read more

Brain ‘network maps’ reveal clue to mental decline in old age

February 9, 2011

The human brain operates as a highly interconnected small-world network, not as a collection of discrete regions as previously believed, with important implications for why many of us experience cognitive declines in old age, a new study shows.

Using graph theory, Australian researchers have mapped the brain’s neural networks and for the first time linked them with specific cognitive functions, such as information processing and language. Results from the… read more

Brain Mechanism Can Turn Off Trauma of Bad Memories

July 31, 2008

University of California, Irvine and University of Muenster researchers have identified the brain mechanism that turns off traumatic feelings associated with bad memories: a protein called neuropeptide S (NPS).

NPS reduces traumatic responses to bad memories by stimulating neurons in the basolateral amygdala (brain region associated with anxiety and memory formation).

They found that blocking NPS receptors in the amygdala of mice caused traumatic responses to bad memories… read more

Brain May Still Be Evolving, Studies Hint

September 9, 2005

Two genes, microcephalin and ASPM, involved in determining the size of the human brain have undergone substantial evolution in the last 60,000 years, researchers say, leading to the surprising suggestion that the brain is still undergoing rapid evolution.

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