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Cofounder of Siri: Assistant launch is a ‘world-changing event’

October 4, 2011

Perhaps the biggest announcement at Apple’s iPhone event on Tuesday will be Siri, a virtual personal assistant, says 9t5Mac.

“Apple’s ‘mainstreaming’ artificial intelligence in the form of a Virtual Personal Assistant is a groundbreaking event,” said Siri cofounder Norman Winarsky. “I’d go so far as to say it is a world-changing event. Right now, a few people dabble in partial AI-enabled apps like Google Voice Actions, Vlingo… read more

Coffee ‘no boost in the morning’

March 7, 2007

University of Bristol researchers say caffeine eases withdrawal symptoms that build up overnight, but does not make people more alert than normal.

The work showed that only people who have avoided coffee for a while will get a buzz from caffeine.

Coffee drinkers have lower risk of death: NIH study

May 18, 2012

A_small_cup_of_coffee

Older adults who drank coffee — caffeinated or decaffeinated — had a lower risk of death overall than others who did not drink coffee, according a study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and AARP.

Coffee drinkers were less likely to die from heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, injuries and accidents, diabetes, and infections, although the association was… read more

Code that kills, for real

May 12, 2004

Future military combat systems will require ever more complicated code, but writing software that is bug free and ready for a firefight is a challenge that gets tougher every day.

The military faces a “software divergence dilemma” today. In the past 50 years, the amount of code in a typical military system has increased a hundredfold. Meanwhile, in that same span of time, the average productivity of programmers has… read more

Code for Unbreakable Quantum Encryption

April 20, 2006

Raw code for “unbreakable” quantum encryption has been generated at record speed over optical fiber at NIST.

The work is a step toward using conventional high-speed networks such as broadband Internet and local-area networks to transmit ultra-secure video for applications such as surveillance, confidential data, and military opertions.

Cocoa flavanols lower blood pressure and increase blood-vessel function in healthy people

Poor diet and high blood pressure now number one risk factors for death
September 14, 2015

Cocoa pods (credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Two recently published studies in the journals Age and the British Journal of Nutrition (BJN) demonstrate that consuming cocoa flavanols improves cardiovascular function and lessens the burden on the heart that comes with the aging and stiffening of arteries, while reducing the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD)

As we age, our blood vessels become less flexible and less able to expand to let blood flow and circulate normally, and… read more

Cocktail of chemicals may trigger cancer

Fifty chemicals the public is exposed to on a daily basis may trigger cancer when combined, according to new research by global task force of 174 scientists
June 23, 2015

acquired-hallmark phenotypes-ft

A global task force of 174 scientists from leading research centers in 28 countries has studied the link between mixtures of commonly encountered chemicals and the development of cancer. The open-access study selected 85 chemicals not considered carcinogenic to humans and found 50 of them actually supported key cancer-related mechanisms at exposures found in the environment today.

According to co-author cancer Biologist Hemad Yasaei from… read more

Cochlear implant recipients experience improved quality of life

March 6, 2008

A German study of cochlear implant recipients shows the recipients experience a significant improvement in their quality of life after the implant: better speech recognition, sound perception, social interaction, and mental health.

Musicians and music listeners with cochear implants are also benefitting from a University of Washington computerized test, Clinical Assessment of Music Perception (CAMP). It strips down music to three basic components–pitch, timbre, and… read more

‘Cobots’ enhance robotic manufacturing

But how do you integrate them with humans in a manufacturing plant (and overcome negative Hollywood stereotypes)?
January 23, 2015

Baxter, introduced in 2012 by the company Rethink Robotics, is a two-armed robot with a tablet-like panel for its "eyes." (Credit: Rethink Robotics, Inc.)

Manufacturers have begun experimenting with a new generation of “cobots” (collaborative robots) designed to work side-by-side with humans.

To determine best practices for effectively integrating human-robot teams within manufacturing environments, a University of Wisconsin-Madison team headed by Bilge Mutlu, an assistant professor of computer sciences, is working with an MIT team headed by Julie A. Shah, an assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics.… read more

Cobalt atoms on graphene: a low-cost catalyst for producing hydrogen from water

Rice University catalyst may lead to clean, inexpensive hydrogen production for fuel cells
October 23, 2015

A new catalyst just 15 microns thick has proven nearly as effective as platinum-based catalysts but at a much lower cost, according to scientists at Rice University. The catalyst is made of nitrogen-doped graphene with individual cobalt atoms that activate the process. (credit: Tour Group/Rice University)

Graphene doped with nitrogen and augmented with cobalt atoms has proven to be an effective, durable catalyst for the production of hydrogen from water, according to scientists at Rice University.

The Rice University lab of chemist James Tour and colleagues has developed a robust, solid-state catalyst that shows promise to replace expensive platinum for hydrogen generation. (Catalysts can split water into its constituent hydrogen and oxygen atoms, a process… read more

Coaxial ‘nanocable’ could be big boon for energy storage

Could be used to build large-scale energy-storage devices, as components of lab-on-a-chip processors
June 11, 2012

REce_NANOCAPACITOR_Cable

Researchers at Rice University have created a tiny coaxial cable only 100 nanometers wide with higher capacitance than previously reported microcapacitors.

The nanocable,produced with techniques pioneered in the nascent graphene research field, could be used to build next-generation energy-storage systems.

It could also find use in wiring up components of lab-on-a-chip processors.

The tiny coaxial cable is similar in makeup to… read more

Coax goes nano

November 25, 2002

Researchers at Harvard University have made nanoscale wires from layers of different materials using the semiconductor manufacturing processes used to construct computer chips. The nanowires could be used to make faster computer chips, higher-density memory and smaller lasers.

Coatings and arrays help put medication where it’s needed

June 30, 2003

Small tech is helping medicinal molecules such as proteins, peptides, genes and vaccines reach the right destination with greater precision, speed and control.

Researchers are developing devices that can deliver drugs to specific structures within the cell. Others are developing devices to be implanted under a patient’s skin or in the abdomen that would provide tiny, precise doses of hormones, pain medication or other pharmaceuticals on a customizable schedule.… read more

Coated nanotubes make biosensors

December 30, 2004

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using carbon nanotubes to sense single molecules, and are tapping the way carbon nanotubes give off near-infrared light in order to read what the sensors have detected.

The sensors could eventually be used to monitor biochemical changes in biological fluids and tissue in real time.

Coated nanoparticles slip through mucus

January 23, 2007

Nanoparticles coated with polyethylene glycol can quickly slip through human mucus. The results raise hopes for more efficient delivery of a variety of drugs.

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