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This box sends your health data straight to the cloud

December 12, 2011

2net

A new platform from Qualcomm called 2net uses a simple box in the home that detect signals from medical monitoring devices of dozens of makers, and dispatches them by cellular connection to a cloud database that can be accessed by medical staff as well as patients.

 

This Computer May Be Too Smart

July 17, 2006

University of Cambridge scientist Professor Peter Robinson has developed a “mind-reading” computer that can interpret reactions and feelings by analyzing a person’s facial movements.

This crop revolution may succeed where GM failed

October 30, 2006

New agricultural technology called marker-assisted selection (MAS) offers a sophisticated method to greatly accelerate classical breeding.

A growing number of scientists believe MAS will eventually replace GM food.

Rapidly accumulating information about crop genomes is allowing scientists to identify genes associated with traits such as yield, and then scan crop relatives for the presence of those genes.

‘This house wants to defeat aging entirely’: de Grey vs. Blakemore

April 24, 2012

Aubrey de Grey

Oxford University Scientific Society is hosting a debate on Wednesday, April, 25, 2012, addressing whether aging should be a target of decisive medical intervention — raising the possibility of substantial extension of human lifespan.

Dr. Aubrey de Grey will propose the motion, “This house wants to defeat aging entirely“ and Professor Colin Blakemore will be opposing. The debate will be chaired and moderated by Professor Sir Richard… read more

This Is a Computer on Your Brain

July 13, 2006

Researchers at Columbia University are combining the processing power of the human brain with computer vision to develop a novel device that will allow people to search through images ten times faster than they can on their own.

The “cortically coupled computer vision system,” known as C3 Vision, harnesses the brain’s well-known ability to recognize an image much faster than the person can identify it.

This Is how Dennis Tito plans to send people to Mars

February 28, 2013

Mars-Capsule_220213.m

If Dennis Tito has his way, two people will leave our planet in January 2018 and make a trip to Mars and back, with a quick flyby, SpaceRef reports.

The project is being spearheaded by a non-profit organization, the Inspiration Mars Foundation.

Tito’s mission will be facilitated by donors, not investors.

Tito and a group of coauthors from NASA and several aerospace companies… read more

This is the gyro-stabilized, two-wheeled future of transportation

May 30, 2012

C1 (credit: Jon Synder/Wired/creative commons)

Motors’ C1 fully electric, fully enclosed, two-wheeled two-seater, due out in 2014, features  two gyroscopes that keep the C1 roll-stabilized, with a range of 220 miles between charges, reports Wired AUTOPIA. Estimated initial price: $24K.

Video

This is what Wall Street’s terrifying robot invasion looks like

August 8, 2012

hft_chart

This animated GIF chronicles the rise of the HFT Algo Machines from January 2007 through January 2012 (credit: Nanex Research, hosted by imgur.com)

Given the the endless mind-whirling acronyms, derivatives and structures of the financial markets, we’re rarely served with a visualization that so elegantly illustrates the arrival of Wall Street’s latest innovation.

This is what high frequency trading looks like, when specially… read more

This Is Your Brain on Drugs

June 1, 2004

Scientists are developing technology to peer into the brains of people taking antidepressants, hoping to cut down on the arduous process of evaluating the drugs.

Aspect Medical Systems has developed a system to do that based on the EEG, which records the firing of brain cells in the frontal lobe, blood flow and other activity. It uses a disposable strip of electrodes that affixes to the forehead and feeds… read more

This is your brain on freestyle rap

November 19, 2012

Open Mike Eagle (credit: Mush Records)

Researchers in the voice, speech, and language branch of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the brain activity of rappers when they are “freestyling” — spontaneously improvising lyrics in real time.

Published online in the November 15 issue of the journal Scientific Reports (open access), the findings… read more

This Is Your Brain on Schadenfreude

January 24, 2006

Functional magnetic resonance imaging has reached the level of sophistication required to identify states of mind, as shown in one recent experiment to measure levels of empathy, based on “pain-related areas” in the brain when a person is watching someone else in pain.

This is your brain on violent media

December 7, 2007

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center’s Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) Research Center have shown that watching violent programs can cause parts of your brain that suppress aggressive behaviors to become less active.

Depictions of violent acts have become very common in the popular media,” said Christopher Kelly, the first author on the paper and a current CUMC medical student. “Our findings demonstrate for the first time that watching… read more

This Is Your Business, Virtually

January 23, 2003

The video-conferencing room at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York now allows for virtual meetings on a new 4-foot-by-16-foot high-definition rear-projection screen, with 200 milliseconds latency.

This is your grid on brains

October 3, 2008

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology plan to use living neural networks composed of thousands of brain cells from laboratory rats to control simulated power grids in the lab.

From those studies, they hope to create a “biologically inspired” computer program to manage and control complex power grids in Mexico, Brazil, Nigeria and elsewhere, and possibly other complex systems, such as traffic-control systems or global financial networks.… read more

This Laser Trick’s a Quantum Leap

October 5, 2005

Physicists in Australia have slowed a speeding laser pulse and captured it in a crystal, a feat that could be instrumental in creating quantum computers.

The scientists slowed the laser light pulse from 300,000 kilometers per second to just several hundred meters per second, allowing them to capture the pulse for about a second.

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