The Times | Search engines will be able to flirt with users by 2029

June 14, 2014

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The Times — June 14, 2014 | Hannah Devlin

Speaking at the Exponential Finance conference this week, Ray Kurzweil, director of engineering at Google, said: “Computers will be at human levels, such that you can have an emotional relationship with them, 15 years from now.” Her was a realistic portrayal of how humans and computers might interact in the future, he said.

The comments suggest that Google, working on a natural language search engine that would allow users to type in questions conversationally and get meaningful responses,… read more

Singularity University Singularity Hub | Exponential Finance, Ray Kurzweil stresses humanity’s moral imperative in developing artificial intelligence

June 5, 2015

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Singularity University Singularity Hub — June 5, 2015 | David J. Hill

Ray Kurzweil said at the Exponential Finance conference, “We have a moral imperative to continue the promise of artificial intelligence while controlling the peril. I’m optimistic, but we shouldn’t be lulled into a lack of concern.”

Kurzweil’s view contrasts Elon Musk’s, who caused a stir last year when he tweeted, “Worth reading Superintelligence by Nick Bostrom, PhD. We need to be careful with AI. Potentially more dangerous than nukes.”… read more

Inventor Spot | Will robots social-network when they eclipse man’s intelligence?

May 21, 2013

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Inventor Spot — May 21, 2013 | Ron Callari

In his book The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology, futurist Ray Kurzweil predicts that computers will be as smart as humans by 2029, and that by 2045, “computers will be billions of times more powerful than unaided human intelligence,” Kurzweil wrote in an email to LiveScience.

Singularity, for those mere mortals who are unaware, is the theoretical emergence of a super-intelligence through technological means. First proposed… read more

The Washington Post | Art review Human, Soul and Machine: The Coming Singularity

December 19, 2013

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The Washington Post — December 19, 2013 | Michael O’Sullivan

From one perspective, the future looks bright at the American Visionary Art Museum, where the exhibition “Human, Soul and Machine: The Coming Singularity” explores man’s tenuous relationship with technology.

According to the futurist author and inventor Ray Kurzweil — who is featured in a 79-minute documentary that loops continuously as part of the show and who will be honored with the museum’s Grand Visionary Award next… read more

The Futurist | How to make a mind

February 15, 2013

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The Futurist — February 15, 2013 | Ray Kurzweil

Can nonbiological brains have real minds of their own? In this article, drawn from his latest book, futurist/inventor Ray Kurzweil describes the future of intelligence — artificial and otherwise.

“The mammalian brain has a distinct aptitude not found in any other class of animal. We are capable of hierarchical thinking, of understanding a structure composed of diverse elements arranged in a pattern, representing that arrangement with a symbol,… read more

Motherboard | Brain cells may live longer when not tied to their weakling, mortal flesh

February 27, 2013

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Motherboard — February 27, 2013 | Austin Considine

In an interview last year with Motherboard’s Derek Mead, professor Kevin Warwick described an experiment in which he and a team of scientists created a very simple, two-dimensional, living brain of about 100,000 neurons and connected it to robots (a human brain, by contrast, approaches 100 billion).

It’s just a matter of time, he suggests, before scientists can build one in 3-D that’s much bigger. He also thinks… read more

CNBC | Live forever, maybe by uploading your brain

May 4, 2015

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CNBC — May 4, 2015 | Cadie Thompson

At the eMerge Americas conference, Martine Rothblatt, PhD, CEO of United Therapeutics said she shares the beliefs of computer scientist Ray Kurzweil that tech advancements will ultimately enable humans to live forever. A first stage could include preserving a person’s brain in software after the body has died.

Rothblatt’s company does work in transplanting organs, and she said her experience in the field has shaped her views.

“In… read more

Fever Picture | Artist Gavin Blake illustrates Ray Kurzweil’s talk

December 28, 2011

Artist Gavin Blake illustrates Ray Kurzweil's talk

Ray Kurzweil recently keynoted Australia’s Creative Innovation 2011 conference. Artist Gavin Blake (director of Fever Picture “graphic facilitation agency”) documented the event  with these clever illustrations. You can see more examples of their work on here. Click on the [+] expand button in the upper right-hand corner of the two images below to expand them to full size for best readability.… read more

Video Source: Fever Picture | Gavin Blake

The Guardian | From zero gravity to ride & tie, the quirky hobbies of the tech elite

May 11, 2016

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The Guardian — April 8, 2016 | Olivia Solon

For Silicon Valley’s successful tech entrepreneurs the world is a playground of creative ways to unwind, and even boost productivity. Long hours, high stress and overwhelming pressure — the work culture of Silicon Valley is notoriously unforgiving.

So it’s not surprising that tech entrepreneurs find creative ways to blow off steam in their spare time.

Google co-founder Sergey Brin, for example, spends time learning flying trapeze, while former… read more

The Huffington Post | Are computers playing games with us?

April 2, 2012

The Huffington Post — April 2, 2012 | David H. Bailey

The future will be different. So where is all this heading? A recent Time article features an interview with futurist Ray Kurzweil, who predicts an era, roughly in 2045, when machine intelligence will meet, then transcend human intelligence. Such future intelligent systems will then design even more powerful technology, resulting in a dizzying advance that we can only dimly foresee at the present time. Kurzweil outlines… read more

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