Voice of America | Inventing the Future

June 24, 2009

VOA

Voice of America — Jun 24, 2009 | Erin Brummett

Welcome to T2A Chat as we meet one of the world’s leading inventors, Ray Kurzweil. He was principal developer of the first CCD flat-bed scanner, the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition. Ray joins us from Boston, Massachusetts.

The Huffington Post | Ray Kurzweil on translation technology

June 13, 2011

The Huffington Post — June 13, 2011 | Nataly Kelly

Will advances in translation technology ever enable us to live in a society free of language barriers? I recently had the pleasure of conducting an interview with the well-known inventor, author, and futurist Ray Kurzweil to ask him this and other questions about his views on the future of translation.

According to Kurzweil, machines will reach human levels of translation quality by the year 2029. However, he… read more

Forbes | Paul Allen says that the Singularity is far, far away

October 14, 2011

Forbes — October 14, 2011 | Alex Knapp

Don’t get me wrong — I think that there’s a lot of absolutely fascinating scientific and technological work being done. I’ve no doubt that computers are going to become more tightly integrated in our lives, and I personally believe that as computers get more sophisticated, they’ll enable an incredible unleashing of human creativity. But I think we’re a long way off from from computers that can do… read more

Flip the Media | Ray Kurzweil brings the Singularity to SXSW

March 13, 2012

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Flip the Media — March 13, 2012 | Joe Pavey

On Monday afternoon author and inventor Ray Kurzweil took the stage at SXSW for an interview session with frequent Time magazine contributor Lev Grossman.

Kurzweil, somewhat of a controversial figure in the tech community, was there to discuss his radically optimistic views on technology, human consciousness, and evolution.

The session began with Kurzweil delivering a short slide presentation about his predictions on how technology will impact… read more

New Scientist | Will we ever understand how our brains work?

November 9, 2012

New Scientist

New Scientist — November 9, 2012 | Laura Spinney

Several projects are trying to reverse-engineer the brain. In How to Create a Mind, futurist Ray Kurzweil champions their cause.

When it comes to the human brain, many scientists believe that we are incapable of understanding how it works because we lack the tools and intelligence to measure its mind-blowing complexity. Others are starting to question that notion, and to subtly redefine the task. In How to Create aread more

Fast Company | Ray Kurzweil now on the job at Google

December 17, 2012

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Fast Company — December 17, 2012 | Neal Ungerleider

The search giant welcomes a Singularity evangelist. He will work on unspecified machine-learning and language-processing projects.

Ray Kurzweil is best known these days as the world’s foremost Singularity evangelist and as a prophet of a whizbang, techno-utopian future. However, Kurzweil first came to tech fame as a machine-learning guru whose groundbreaking work on voice recognition and optical character recognition changed computing and laid the groundwork for everything from Siri to… read more

Silicon Valley Business Journal | 5 things you should know about the future

February 15, 2013

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Silicon Valley Business Journal — February 15, 2013 | Preeti Upadhyaya

Silicon Valley is known for inventing the future rather than predicting it. But this week, I did a deep dive into the business of futurism, speaking with several professional futurists about what they see on the horizon. Here are the top five takeaways from my conversations with experts in the art of navigating the unknown.

2) Rather than playing dress-up in history class, you’ll be able… read more

Information Week | Voice Dream Reader affordable TTS for disabled users

May 15, 2013

information_week

Information Week — May 15, 2013 | David F. Carr

Text-to-voice technology has a long history. The famed technologist Ray Kurzweil created an early reading software product in 1976, which in 1996 led to the founding of Kurzweil Educational Systems, a leading maker of reading software for PCs and Macs.

However, the Kurzweil software costs as much as $1,500 a seat, while some of the other PC-based text-to-speech products cost $50 to $70, Chen said. “We charge… read more

Democrat and Chronicle | Ra Ra Riot is pushing its sound

May 31, 2013

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Democrat and Chronicle — May 31, 2013 | Jeff Spevak

There is a temptation here to present Ra Ra Riot as some kind of intellectual pop hothouse of futuristic ideas, discussing the artificial intelligence predictions of Ray Kurzweil and the sci-fi futurist writings of William Gibson while riding from gig to gig in the tour bus. “It has happened,” says violinist Rebecca Zeller. “Probably more in the van than in the bus.”

To… read more

CNET | Glassholes: At least you know who they are

March 16, 2014

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CNET — March 16, 2014 | Stephen Shankland

It’s quite possible that ordinary looking glasses, or perhaps jewelry or clothing or Bluetooth earpieces, could have such technology built into it. Maybe it’ll even be in contact lenses or, if Ray Kurzweil is right, nanobots in our brains and bloodstream will intercept our own sensory data, process and store it, then communicate directly with our own neurons.

That latter idea is pretty far out, but given how… read more

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