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Slashdot | Interviews: Ask Ray Kurzweil about the future of mankind and technology

January 28, 2013

slashdot

Source: Slashdot — January 28, 2013

The recipient of nineteen honorary doctorates, and honors from three U.S. presidents, Ray Kurzweil’s accolades are almost too many to list. A prolific inventor, Kurzweil created the first CCD flatbed scanner, the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, and the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments.

His book, Theread more

Dow Jones | Introducing WSJ Startup of the Year

May 29, 2013

Source: Dow Jones

INTRODUCING ‘WSJ STARTUP OF THE YEAR’

NEW YORK (April 29, 2013)—The Wall Street Journal will be launching ‘WSJ Startup of the Year,’ an episodic video documentary for WSJ Live, the Journal’s online video platform. Slated to premiere June 24, the documentary matches global business leaders and influencers with 25 innovative startups, capturing their stories from startup to success over the course of five months. Throughout the documentary, editors from… read more

Voice of America | Inventing the Future

June 24, 2009

VOA

Source: Voice of America — Jun 24, 2009 | Erin Brummett

Welcome to T2A Chat as we meet one of the world’s leading inventors, Ray Kurzweil. He was principal developer of the first CCD flat-bed scanner, the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition. Ray joins us from Boston, Massachusetts.… read more

The Wall Street Journal | Inventing with an eye on the future

August 22, 2013

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Source: The Wall Street Journal — August 21, 2013 | Caitlin Huston

Even with an exceptional idea, budding entrepreneurs can struggle to move past the brainstorming stages. They face challenges in execution like building a cohesive team, coming up with a business plan and even understanding how to present their product or service.

This week mentors on WSJ Startup of the Year, a documentary on WSJ.com, offered some words of inspiration for all entrepreneurs. Here’s what some science… read more

San Francisco Sentinel | Inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil comes to Wheeler Auditorium

March 28, 2013

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Source: San Francisco Sentinel — March 28, 2013

“The restless genius” (Wall Street Journal) Ray Kurzweil comes to Cal Performances’ Wheeler Auditorium on Saturday, April 13 at 8:00 p.m. He has been nicknamed the “rightful heir to Thomas Edison” by Forbes for making cutting-edge technological advances including the first flatbed scanner, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, and the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano.

In addition to his… read more

The Blaze | Inventor Kurzweil: No more disease, aging, printable replacement organs

December 14, 2013

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Source: The Blaze — December 10, 2013 | Benjamin Weingarten

In an article for CNN, inventor, futurist and author of five books, including one of Glenn Beck’s favorites, The Age of Spiritual Machines: When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence, Ray Kurzweil provided five staggering predictions as to what we could expect in the 2020s and 2030s, including among others major advancements in medicine and 3D printing.

Kurzweil developed the theory of the “Singularity” whereby he predicts that human intelligence and artificial intelligence… read more

Associated Press | Inventor sets his sights on immortality

February 12, 2005

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Source: Associated Press — February 12, 2005 | Jay Lindsay

Will nanotechnology spark breakthrough in 20 years? Ray Kurzweil doesn’t tailgate. A man who plans to live forever doesn’t take chances with his health on the highway, or anywhere else. As part of his daily routine, Kurzweil ingests 250 supplements, eight to 10 glasses of alkaline water and 10 cups of green tea. He also periodically tracks 40 to 50 fitness indicators, down to his “tactile sensitivity.” Adjustments

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The Energy Collective | Irreversible trends spur consumer energy independence

August 25, 2013

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Source: The Energy Collective — August 20, 2013 | Steven Collier

A number of experts believe that Moore’s law is just a special case of a more profound principle stated by Theodore Wright in a 1936 paper, “Facts Affecting Costs of Airplanes.” Ray Kurzweil more recently restated Wright’s Law, as it came to be known, as “The Law of Accelerating Returns.”

They assert that “practice makes perfect” and there are “economies of production.” The power and economics… read more

The Energy Collective | Is America becoming a third world country with first world emissions?

March 24, 2010

Source: The Energy Collective — March 24, 2010 | Dave Rochlin

This led one audience member to put the idea to Ms. Huffington that maybe the U.S. should become a third world country.

On the other side of the debate were the optimistic technologists, lead by the prolific inventor Ray Kurzweil, who points to the dramatically increasing price-performance of phones and computers, to assert that innovation in solar energy, battery storage (and other areas such as water… read more

The Boston Phoenix | Is genius immortal? Tech god Ray Kurzweil is a modern-day Edison: now he’s battling to stay alive — forever

May 3, 2010

boston

Source: The Boston Phoenix — May 3, 2010 | Chris Faraone

No disrespect to the man who let there be electric light, but Ray Kurzweil is Thomas Alva Edison on steroids. That might not be evident on a visitor’s first trip to his Kurzweil Technologies, a sleek yet modest office in Wellesley Hills, which is rather ordinary looking for the headquarters of a futurist who’s striving to live forever.

Still, the 62-year-old inventor is aware of the Edison comparisons, and… read more

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