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The New York Times | Keep calm and carry on buying

March 9, 2013

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Source: The New York Times — March 9, 2013 | Evgeny Morozov

A future of frictionless, continuous shopping fits with Google’s vision for a world where we no longer need to search for anything, since we ourselves are perpetually monitored, with the relevant product or information sent to us based on perceived need. “Autonomous search,” they call it.

Ray Kurzweil, Google’s director of engineering, even wants to give us a “cybernetic friend” that could satisfy our… read more

The Christian Science Monitor | Kiss me, you human

June 28, 2001

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Source: The Christian Science Monitor — June 28, 2001 | Stephen Humphries

You needn’t have taken a philosophy course to see A.I., the new Steven Spielberg movie, but you may wish you’d enrolled in Philosophy 101 by the time you exit the cinema. A.I. (Artificial Intelligence), is a futuristic story in which a robot resembling an 11-year-old boy embarks on a Pinocchio-like quest to become human. Mr. Spielberg’s movie posits the idea that machines can develop self-awareness, and even… read more

MediaPost | Knowledge Graph, Satori, and Unicorn

March 21, 2013

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Source: MediaPost — March 21, 2013 | Laurie Sullivan

Tying together multiple profiles and networks to serve up information about a person, a place or a thing creates challenges for search engines. It’s like stringing or graphing together an underlying net below the surface of the Web to connect all things throughout the world. It is based on the relationship between entities or links.

Google created the Knowledge Graph, which will become the backbone for… read more

The Huffington Post | Kurzweil at Techonomy: artificial intelligence is empowering all of humanity

November 12, 2012

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Source: The Huffington Post — November 12, 2012 | Adrienne Burke

If you know electronic synthesized music, you know the work of Ray Kurzweil. But the MIT futurist and transhumanist has many more inventions to his name than electronic keyboards. He’s also developed a cult following for his prediction of the merging of humans and computers, which he describes in his book The Singularity Is Near. And in a forthcoming book, How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Humanread more

Singularity Hub | Kurzweil defends his predictions again: Was he 86% correct?

January 4, 2011

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Source: Singularity Hub — January 4, 2011 | Aaron Saenz

How would you grade yourself if you had a chance to write your own report card? Ray Kurzweil is giving himself a high B.

With his recent essay “How My Predictions Are Faring” the noted futurist reviews forecasts he made more than a decade ago for our current times. His predicted future is now the present, so it’s time to see how he did.

The… read more

The Dartmouth | Kurzweil discusses future of tech

November 9, 2012

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Source: The Dartmouth — November 9, 2012 | Charles Rafkin

Kurzweil, inventor of the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, founder of Singularity University and the “rightful heir to Thomas Edison,” according to Forbes, compared medical advances to other technological advances, arguing that biology now is subject to the same law of accelerating returns.

Kurzweil predicted that scientists will soon be able to “reprogram” the information processes that form the foundations of biology. “The brain is… read more

National Inventors Hall of Fame | Kurzweil Inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame

May 16, 2002

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Source: National Inventors Hall of Fame — May 16, 2002

Ray Kurzweil was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame on May 16, 2002. He was recognized for the invention of the Kurzweil Reading Machine and other significant inventions.

Father of the Kurzweil Reading Machine Helped the Blind While Reshaping Information Technology for the World

Imagine enabling the blind to “read” ordinary printed materials, along the way pioneering information technologies that profoundly impact how the world processes information for decades to come.… read more

JavaOne Conference Proceedings | Kurzweil keynote transcript for Oracle’s 2010 JavaOne Conference

September 23, 2010

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Source: JavaOne Conference Proceedings — September 23, 2010

Also see the JavaOne wrap-up article: Extreme Technologies at an Extreme Event: The 2010 JavaOne Conference was rich in ideas, innovation, and entertainment.”

Transcript of Ray Kurzweil keynote for Oracle’s JavaOne Conference 2010: “The Age of Embedded Computing, Everywhere.”

I started using computers in 1960, that is 50 years ago. I was 12 years old. That’s not so amazing today, but it was… read more

Global Retail Marketing Association | Kurzweil keynote: national brands gather to hear predictions in technology and its impact on managing innovation

March 27, 2010

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Source: Global Retail Marketing Association — March 27, 2010

Global Retail Marketing Association | The Global Retail Marketing Association announces Ray Kurzweil, bestselling author, to speak at the 4th annual GRMA Leadership Forum.

Senior marketers from leading national retail brands will gather in April to hear Kurzweil’s predictions on the future of technology and its impact on managing innovation. Inventor and recipient of nineteen honorary doctorates, Kurzweil has been described by The Wall Street Journal as “the restless genius” and ”the ultimate thinking machine” by Forbes.… read more

Technology Review | Kurzweil responds: Don’t underestimate the Singularity

October 19, 2011

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Source: Technology Review — October 19, 2011 | Ray Kurzweil

Last week, Paul Allen and a colleague challenged the prediction that computers will soon exceed human intelligence. Now Ray Kurzweil, the leading proponent of the “Singularity,” offers a rebuttal.

Although Paul Allen paraphrases my 2005 book, The Singularity Is Near, in the title of his essay (cowritten with his colleague Mark Greaves), it appears that he has not actually read the book. His only citation is to an… read more

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