Most Recently Added Most commentedBy Title | A-Z

Coast to Coast AM | Mind-machine

February 24, 2013

Coast to Coast AM logo

Source: Coast to Coast AM — February 24, 2013

In the first half, George Knapp welcomed futurist Ray Kurzweil for a discussion on the merging of man and machine as well as his research into reverse engineering the human brain to understand precisely how it works. According to Kurzweil’s estimate, the brain consists of 300 million “pattern recognizers” which assign these trends into hierarchies.

This hierarchy ranges from simple patterns like shapes and sounds, at the low… read more

dw2 | The world’s most eminent sociologist highlights the technological singularity

February 20, 2013

dw2 logo

Source: dw2 — February 20, 2013 | David William Wood

Everyone should read the books of Ray Kurzweil, who has recently become an Engineering Director at Google. Kurzweil’s book makes it clear that: Within our lifetimes, human beings will no longer be human beings; there are multiple accelerating rates of change in several different disciplines; The three main disciplines contributing to the singularity are nanotech, AI, and biotech; All are transforming our understanding of the human body and,… read more

The Verge | Obama plans decade-long research effort to map the human brain and explore consciousness

February 18, 2013

The Verge logo

Source: The Verge — February 18, 2013 | T.C. Sottek

The New York Times reports that the Obama administration plans to spearhead a scientific effort over the next decade that aims to build a comprehensive map of activity in the human brain. The effort will reportedly involve scientists from federal agencies and private foundations that will work together to advance our understanding of perception, actions, and consciousness.

The Times says that the project seeks to accomplish the same level of… read more

TechCrunch | Get ready to lose your job

February 16, 2013

TechCrunch logo

Source: TechCrunch — February 16, 2013 | Jon Evans

For 50 years now Moore’s Law has been (to oversimplify) doubling computing power every two years. People like Ray Kurzweil and Vernor Vinge look at that astonishing history of nonstop exponential growth and predict a technological singularity within our lifetimes.

Kurzweil claims that whenever technology hits a limit, “a paradigm shift (i.e., a fundamental change in the approach) occurs, which enables exponential growth to continue.” That’s not much more than a convenient… read more

Silicon Valley Business Journal | 5 things you should know about the future

February 15, 2013

Silicon Valley Business Journal logo

Source: Silicon Valley Business Journal — February 15, 2013 | Preeti Upadhyaya

Silicon Valley is known for inventing the future rather than predicting it. But this week, I did a deep dive into the business of futurism, speaking with several professional futurists about what they see on the horizon. Here are the top five takeaways from my conversations with experts in the art of navigating the unknown.

2) Rather than playing dress-up in history class, you’ll be able… read more

Silicon Valley Business Journal | The quotable Kurzweil

February 15, 2013

Silicon Valley Business Journal logo

Source: Silicon Valley Business Journal — February 15, 2013 | Preeti Upadhyaya

Spent an hour chatting with futurist Ray Kurzweil about some of his predictions for the coming decades, and here are three of his biggest “pie in the sky” ideas, as he likes to call them.

Turn off Caveman genes: We will be able manage metabolism by turning off genes. “We’re not depending on the next big hunt for our daily nourishment anymore.”

Playread more

Silicon Valley Business Journal | Do you need a futurist? Ray Kurzweil says yes

February 15, 2013

Silicon Valley Business Journal logo

Source: Silicon Valley Business Journal — February 15, 2013 | Preeti Upadhyaya

Ray KurzweilGoogle Inc.’s director of engineering, took the stage at NASA’s research park at Moffett Field and the crowd fell silent. They’d been waiting all week at Singularity University’s FutureMed conference in Mountain View to hear the storied futurist-inventor-author speak. Finally, the slight, bespectacled Kurzweil launched in, telling the history of Silicon Valley’s role in the exponential advance of innovation in his heavy New York… read more

The Futurist | How to make a mind

February 15, 2013

The Futurist logo

Source: The Futurist — February 15, 2013 | Ray Kurzweil

Can nonbiological brains have real minds of their own? In this article, drawn from his latest book, futurist/inventor Ray Kurzweil describes the future of intelligence — artificial and otherwise.

“The mammalian brain has a distinct aptitude not found in any other class of animal. We are capable of hierarchical thinking, of understanding a structure composed of diverse elements arranged in a pattern, representing that arrangement with a symbol,… read more

The News and Observer | Google Now offers glimpse of where the search giant is headed

February 10, 2013

News and Observer logo

Source: The News and Observer — February 10, 2013 | Paul Gilster

Google Translate has many languages to work with and plenty of computer horsepower behind it. Thinking about its methods reminds me that Ray Kurzweil has now gone to work for Google. Kurzweil is an Edisonian figure who came up with the first flatbed scanner and the first machine that could read text aloud. He has created music synthesizers and made huge strides in PC speech recognition, the… read more

Big Think | Ray Kurzweil: Your brain in the cloud

February 10, 2013

big think logo

Source: Big Think — February 10, 2013 | Jonathan Fowler & Elizabeth Rodd

Transcript | Ray Kurzweil: Sometimes people think that emotion and art are sort of sideshows to human intelligence and the real essence of intelligence is thinking logically. If that were true, computers are already smarter than we are because they’re much better at logical thinking than we are. It’s actually things like being funny, being sexy or expressing a loving sentiment; maybe in a poem or in… read more

close and return to Home