Associated Press | Inventor sets his sights on immortality

February 12, 2005

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Associated Press — February 12, 2005 | Jay Lindsay

Will nanotechnology spark breakthrough in 20 years? Ray Kurzweil doesn’t tailgate. A man who plans to live forever doesn’t take chances with his health on the highway, or anywhere else. As part of his daily routine, Kurzweil ingests 250 supplements, eight to 10 glasses of alkaline water and 10 cups of green tea. He also periodically tracks 40 to 50 fitness indicators, down to his “tactile sensitivity.” Adjustments

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The Energy Collective | Irreversible trends spur consumer energy independence

August 20, 2013

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The Energy Collective — August 20, 2013 | Steven Collier

A number of experts believe that Moore’s law is just a special case of a more profound principle stated by Theodore Wright in a 1936 paper, “Facts Affecting Costs of Airplanes.” Ray Kurzweil more recently restated Wright’s Law, as it came to be known, as “The Law of Accelerating Returns.”

They assert that “practice makes perfect” and there are “economies of production.” The power and economics… read more

The Energy Collective | Is America becoming a third world country with first world emissions?

March 24, 2010

The Energy Collective — March 24, 2010 | Dave Rochlin

This led one audience member to put the idea to Ms. Huffington that maybe the U.S. should become a third world country.

On the other side of the debate were the optimistic technologists, lead by the prolific inventor Ray Kurzweil, who points to the dramatically increasing price-performance of phones and computers, to assert that innovation in solar energy, battery storage (and other areas such as water… read more

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists | Is artificial intelligence really an existential threat to humanity?

August 4, 2015

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Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists — July 30, 2015 | Edward Moore Geist

Superintelligence, the book by Oxford University philosopher Nick Bostrom, PhD, is the culmination of intellectual trends mounting for decades, with a significant mainstream following.

Ray Kurzweil, Director of Engineering at Google, is an apostle for the notion that self-improving artificial intelligence will bring about a tech revolution he calls the singularity.

In his vision, uploaded human minds will merge with AI to live forever in android bodies or as computer… read more

The Boston Phoenix | Is genius immortal? Tech god Ray Kurzweil is a modern-day Edison: now he’s battling to stay alive — forever

May 3, 2010


The Boston Phoenix — May 3, 2010 | Chris Faraone

No disrespect to the man who let there be electric light, but Ray Kurzweil is Thomas Alva Edison on steroids. That might not be evident on a visitor’s first trip to his Kurzweil Technologies, a sleek yet modest office in Wellesley Hills, which is rather ordinary looking for the headquarters of a futurist who’s striving to live forever.

Still, the 62-year-old inventor is aware of the Edison comparisons, and… read more

MIT Technology Review | Is Google cornering the market on deep learning?

January 29, 2014

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MIT Technology Review — January 29, 2014 | Antonio Regalado

As advanced machine learning transitions from a primarily scientific pursuit to one with high industrial importance, Google’s bench is probably deepest.

Names it has lured from academia into full-time or part-time roles include Sebastian Thrun (who has worked on the company’s autonomous car project); Fernando Pereira, a onetime University of Pennsylvania computer scientist; Stanford’s Andrew Ng; and Singularity University boss Ray Kurzweil. [...]

The McKinsey Quarterly | IT growth and global change: A conversation with Ray Kurzweil

January 1, 2011

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The McKinsey Quarterly — January 1, 2011 | Lars Föyen

The inventor, businessman, and author explains how the exponential growth of technologies will transform industries and pose new opportunities  and hurdles for business and society.

Every executive recognizes the fast pace of technological development but grapples with the billion-dollar question: what happens next, and when? Ray Kurzweil has precise answers based on his thesis that information technology will continue to develop exponentially, leading to a not-so-distant future when… read more

Style | It’s Her party: Spike Jonze rolls out his latest

December 17, 2013

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Style — December 17, 2013 | Lauren Goodman

Her is the first film Jonze has written himself, and it’s stunning. Set in a future Los Angeles, there was much chatter about artificial intelligence afterward in the Q&A, which Larry Ellison moderated.

Jonze mentioned Ray Kurzweil, the futurist who works at Google and who Mike Mills also cited when I interviewed him last week for Nowness, about a film he made about the future for SFMOMA. [...]

The Washington Post | It’s a beautiful time to be alive and educated

August 25, 2014

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The Washington Post — August 25, 2014 | Vivek Wadhwa

This progression is known as Moore’s law. For more than 100 years, the processing power of computers had doubled every 18 months.

Computers and the information technology that they enable are absorbing other fields. So we are seeing exponential advances in sensors, artificial intelligence, robotics, medicine, 3D printing, and so on.

Futurist Ray Kurzweil says: “As any technology becomes an information technology, it starts advancing exponentially.” That… read more

GigaOM | It’s not Skynet yet: in machine learning there’s still a role for humans

March 20, 2013

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GigaOM — March 20, 2013 | Ki Mae Heussner

If you’ve ever seen any of The Terminator films, you’re familiar with Skynet, the self-aware computing system at odds with humanity. But, even though a perception persists that machines can increasingly solve complex problems and process large amounts of data on their own, machine learning experts say humans still play a very important role.

Human intervention is critical at multiple layers, from choosing the algorithms to apply to… read more

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