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Maximum PC | The Singularity: Five technologies that will change the world (and one that won’t)

June 21, 2011

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Source: Maximum PC — June 21, 2011 | David Gerrold

In math, a singularity is a point where a function demonstrates extreme behavior. The Singularity, as defined by Vernor Vinge and Ray Kurzweil, will occur with the technological creation of superintelligence.

Such a world may be impossible to predict because us poor present-day humans are unable to comprehend what superintelligent entities will want or how they’ll behave to achieve their goals. [...]

The Huffington Post | Ray Kurzweil on translation technology

June 13, 2011

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Source: The Huffington Post — June 13, 2011 | Nataly Kelly

Will advances in translation technology ever enable us to live in a society free of language barriers? I recently had the pleasure of conducting an interview with the well-known inventor, author, and futurist Ray Kurzweil to ask him this and other questions about his views on the future of translation.

According to Kurzweil, machines will reach human levels of translation quality by the year 2029. However, he… read more

Tengri News | Transcendent Man changed Massimov’s vision of future

May 23, 2011

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Source: Tengri News — May 23, 2011

Kazakhstan Prime Minister Karim Massimov posted in tweeted that he watched Barry Ptolemy’s Transcendent Man.  “I saw the film, The Transcendent Man. It changed my vision of the future,” the Prime Minister posted.

Transcendent Man is a documentary about innovations and revolutionary ideas based on Ray Kurzweil’s bestseller called The Singularity is Near. The movie is about the life, career and ideas of Kurzweil, who is well-known in… read more

The Boston Globe | 150 fascinating, fun, important, interesting, lifesaving, life-altering, bizarre and bold ways that MIT has made a difference

May 15, 2011

MIT 150 Boston Globe issue

Source: The Boston Globe — May 15, 2011 | Sam Allis, et al.

Some were invented at MIT. Others were simply inspired by time spent at MIT. But all of them (well, maybe not #150) have had a profound impact, in one way or another, on society, culture, politics, economics, transportation, health, science, and, oh yes, technology.

In the 150 years since the Commonwealth approved a charter by William Barton Rogers to incorporate the “Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Boston Society of… read more

GigaOM: Mobilize | Will Texas Instruments power your next watch?

May 4, 2011

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Source: GigaOM: Mobilize — May 4, 2011 | Kevin C. Tofel

Consumers may not be quite ready for wearable computers, but watch-maker Fossil, along with Texas Instruments, thinks the time is near. The Fossil project, known as Meta Watch, brings a “wearable development system aimed at inspiring the next generation of connected-watch applications.” The Meta Watch will cost $200 when it arrives in July and is powered by TI’s MSP430 ultra-low-power microcontroller and Bluetooth chip.

Hopefully, the Bluetooth… read more

somethinkblue | Waking the universe

May 1, 2011

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Source: somethinkblue — May 1, 2011 | Nima D. Seifi

There are moments in history that shape humanity’s trajectory. Such events vary in form, content and timescale, and the likelihood is that only a few people are ever truly aware of the epistemological, and in some instances geological, ground shifting beneath them. What if we were on the cusp of such a moment right now?

Ray Kurzweil is an inventor, author and futurist, who for years has provoked debate… read more

Time | Ray Kurzweil final rank #30 in the Time Readers’ Choice Poll for the most influential people of 2011

April 21, 2011

Source: Time — April 21, 2011

Time has announced its 2011 Readers’ Choice 100 Poll. It asks readers to “cast your votes for the leaders, artists, innovators, icons and heroes that you think are the most influential people in the world.” The Top 100 results are included in the annual “Time 100” special edition. Ray Kurzweil’s final rank is #30, just below Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. You can see the complete final poll results here.

Related:
Time special edition | The 2011 Time 100

The Economist | The new overlords: Man and technology are evolving together in radical new ways

March 10, 2011

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Source: The Economist — March 10, 2011

Can machines surpass humans in intelligence? People were shocked in 1997 when IBM’s Deep Blue computer beat Garry Kasparov, a Russian grandmaster, at chess. But winning a board game is a trivial task compared with understanding the complexities and idiosyncrasies of human speech. The company has now developed Watson, a supercomputer it thinks is capable of understanding “natural language”.

To put this claim to the test, IBM arranged for… read more

The Huffington Post | The transcendent singularity is near

March 9, 2011

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Source: The Huffington Post — March 9, 2011 | Jason Silva

Ray Kurzweil has become a pop culture phenomenon. The Singularity thesis has gone mainstream, and for those who still have any doubts, look no farther than the recent Time Magazine cover story, “2045: The Year Man Becomes Immortal.” Barry Ptolemy’s film, Transcendent Man, is the absolute best cinematic exploration of Ray Kurzweil and his paradigm shifting ideas. If you didn’t have the patience to read Singularityread more

The Wall Street Journal: Japan | Report by New York correspondent Misako Hida: computers surpass human intelligence, ‘Singularity’

March 4, 2011

Wall Street Journal Japan

Source: The Wall Street Journal: Japan — March 4, 2011 | Misako Hida

In 2045, artificial intelligence (AI) will come to dominate the planet. Computers will surpass human intelligence — this is the “Singularity.” Limits like biological aging and disease will be surpassed — even death will no longer be seen as a restriction to human life. Leading futurist, inventor, entrepreneur, and best-selling author Ray Kurzweil (63) is confident that [...]

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