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The Times | Search engines will be able to flirt with users by 2029

June 14, 2014

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Source: The Times — June 14, 2014 | Hannah Devlin

Speaking at the Exponential Finance conference this week, Ray Kurzweil, director of engineering at Google, said: “Computers will be at human levels, such that you can have an emotional relationship with them, 15 years from now.” Her was a realistic portrayal of how humans and computers might interact in the future, he said.

The comments suggest that Google, working on a natural language search engine that would allow users to type in questions conversationally and get meaningful responses,… read more

Fortune | This is what the world will look like in 2045

June 20, 2013

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Source: Fortune — June 20, 2013 | Clay Dillow

If all that sounds like a fantasy, consider Itskov’s colleagues: speakers at Global Futures 2045 included Church (who pioneered the first truly effective gene sequencing techniques and helped initiate the Human Genome Project), inventor-futurist Ray Kurzweil (now engineering chief at Google), X-Prize Foundation founder and far-out tech entrepreneur Peter H. Diamandis (current project: asteroid mining), and legendary computer technologist James Martin, who shares a name with the… read more

Daily Mail | Google sets up artificial intelligence ethics board to curb the rise of the robots

January 29, 2014

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Source: Daily Mail — January 29, 2014 | Mark Prigg

Google also hired futurist Ray Kurzweil as Engineering Director in 2012.

Kurzweil has famously claimed that in just over 30 years, humans will be able to upload their entire minds to computers and become digitally immortal, an event called singularity. He also claimed the biological parts of our body will be replaced with mechanical parts and this could happen as early as 2100. [...]

American Public Media Marketplace | Ray Kurzweil on the surprising simplicity of the human brain

April 5, 2013

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Source: American Public Media Marketplace — April 5, 2013 | David Brancaccio

The federal government wants to spend $100 million to unravel the complex of the human brain. But there’s someone else who’s been thinking a lot about the brain: The legendary inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil.

Kurzweil has done pioneering work in optical character readers, flatbed scanners, electronic keyboards for musicians, and beyond. He has thought a lot about the ways technology and human beings are becoming more intertwined —… read more

VentureBeat | Even Ray Kurzweil is nervous about a future with hyper-intelligent machines

October 3, 2012

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Source: VentureBeat — October 3, 2012 | Meghan Kelly

“We’re making very discernible progress in AI. It’s quite visceral,” Ray Kurzweil told the audience at the DEMO Fall 2012 conference.

He also made a comment about Apple’s Siri voice assistant and how far it still has to go. Kurzweil was directly involved in creating Nuance, which is the speech-recognition technology behind Siri.

“I think actually the natural language understanding of Siri is fairly weak,”… read more

Forbes | Google’s Engineering Director: 32 years to digital immortality

June 20, 2013

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Source: Forbes — June 20 , 2013 | Peter Cohan

It’s been over six months since December 15 when Google hired Ray Kurzweil as its director of engineering — but today, that hire is drawing huge attention thanks to a 2006 book he wrote about digital immortality.

And BusinessInsider reports that his current role at Google is to help its search technology “understand natural language.” ZDNet speculated that Kurzweil could bring buzz to Google: “Kurzweil gives… read more

Business Insider | Google Engineering Director Kurzweil says immortality is just around the corner

June 18, 2013

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Source: Business Insider — June 18, 2013 | Kevin McLaughlin

Ray Kurzweil, a director of engineering at Google, is convinced that biotechnology advancements will eventually outpace the natural aging process. In other words: He thinks one day it will be possible for humans to live forever.

“Somewhere between 10 and 20 years, there is going to be tremendous transformation of health and medicine,” Kurzweil said Sunday at the Global Future 2045 World Congress in New York City, as reported by CNBC’s… read more

Vanity Fair | Enthusiasts and skeptics debate artificial intelligence

November 26, 2014

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Source: Vanity Fair — November 26, 2014 | Kurt Andersen

I met with Ray Kurzweil, in the process of packing up for Silicon Valley, to begin his new job as Google’s director of engineering — leading a research team to create AI software that can converse in fully human fashion.

I asked if he took the job because Google will be the most powerful entity as we transition toward the singularity, Kurzweil said it “would be somewhat self… read more

Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology | 2013-2063: trekking through the next 50 years

August 27, 2013

Source: Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology — August 27, 2013 | Dick Pelletier

Positive futurists believe we will see more progress during the next five decades than was experienced in the last 200 years. In The Singularity Is Near, author Ray Kurzweil reveals how science will change the ways we live, work, and play. The following offers some of the incredible possibilities we can expect.

2013-2023: More people become techno-savvy in a fully-wired world. Smart phones,… read more

The Washington Post | Ray Kurzweil on the future workforce

November 15, 2012

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Source: The Washington Post — November 15, 2012 | Vivek Wadhwa

Singularity University, on the grounds of the NASA Research Center at Moffett Field in Silicon Valley, abounds in optimism, and, as Singularity’s Vice President of Innovation and Research, I have understandably caught the bug.

I have written about why I believe this will be the most innovative decade in human history, how we are headed for an era of abundant and affordable health care, and how robotics, artificial intelligence and… read more

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