The Economist | The Economist’s Innovation Award for Computing and Telecommunications given to pioneer Raymond Kurzweil

October 13, 2009

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The Economist — October 13, 2009

[...] The Economist is delighted to recognise Raymond Kurzweil, founder of Kurzweil Computer Products and Kurzweil Applied Intelligence, as this year’s winner in the category Computing and Telecommunications.

Previous winners in this category include Matti Makkonen, former Executive Vice Pesident, Sonera, for his work on Short Message Service (SMS) text messaging, and Mike Lazaridis, founder of Research in Motion, for the development of the BlackBerry mobile… read more

Foreign Policy | The FP top 100 global thinkers

November 30, 2009

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Foreign Policy — November 30, 2009

From the brains behind Iran’s Green Revolution to the economic Cassandra who actually did have a crystal ball, they had the big ideas that shaped our world in 2009. Read on to see the 100 minds that mattered most in the year that was.

71. Ray Kurzweil — for advancing the technology of eternal life.

FUTURIST | NORTH ANDOVER, MASS.

By 2045, the differences… read more

NY Daily News | Top futurist, Ray Kurzweil, predicts how technology will change humanity by 2020

December 13, 2009

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NY Daily News — December 13th, 2009 | Ray Kurzweil

As we approach the end of the first decade of the new millennium, let’s consider what life will be like a decade hence. Changes in our lives from technology are moving faster and faster. The telephone took 50 years to reach a quarter of the U.S. population. Search engines, social networks and blogs have done that in just a few years time. Consider that Facebook started as… read more

h+ magazine | Ray Kurzweil: The h+ interview

December 30, 2009

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h+ magazine — December 30, 2009 | Surfdaddy Orca, R.U. Sirius

A 3-way conversation with the brilliant and controversial inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil needs little or no introduction to most h+ readers. Principal developer of the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first CCD flat-bed scanner, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition, Ray… read more

The Washington Post | MeriTalk tech conference brings public and private sectors together

March 1, 2010

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The Washington Post — March 1, 2010 | Mike Musgrove

To make some sense of technology’s rapid advances, MeriTalk reached for a Big Thinker, the inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil:

“Part of my mission here will be to broaden the perspective of these IT directors,” he said. “It’s not just routers and cloud computing. We really are transforming all the things we care about with information technology.”

As areas of study such as health intersect… read more

The Energy Collective | Is America becoming a third world country with first world emissions?

March 24, 2010

The Energy Collective — March 24, 2010 | Dave Rochlin

This led one audience member to put the idea to Ms. Huffington that maybe the U.S. should become a third world country.

On the other side of the debate were the optimistic technologists, lead by the prolific inventor Ray Kurzweil, who points to the dramatically increasing price-performance of phones and computers, to assert that innovation in solar energy, battery storage (and other areas such as water… read more

Global Retail Marketing Association | Kurzweil keynote: national brands gather to hear predictions in technology and its impact on managing innovation

March 27, 2010

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Global Retail Marketing Association — March 27, 2010

Global Retail Marketing Association | The Global Retail Marketing Association announces Ray Kurzweil, bestselling author, to speak at the 4th annual GRMA Leadership Forum.

Senior marketers from leading national retail brands will gather in April to hear Kurzweil’s predictions on the future of technology and its impact on managing innovation. Inventor and recipient of nineteen honorary doctorates, Kurzweil has been described by The Wall Street Journal as “the restless genius” and ”the ultimate thinking machine” by Forbes.… read more

The National Association of Broadcasters | Revolutionary inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil will take the stage at 2010 NAB show

April 2, 2010

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The National Association of Broadcasters — April 2, 2010 | NAB staff

 The NAB Show, the annual conference and expo for professionals who create, manage and distribute entertainment across all platforms, has announced that Ray Kurzweil, one of the 21st century’s most revolutionary thinkers, will headline a session entitled “The Acceleration of Technology in the 21st Century: the Impact on Media, Communications, and Society.” A discussion with Donald Marinelli, Executive Producer of Carnegie Mellon University’s Entertainment Technology Center, will… read more

Tampa Bay Times | Future of retail may include cell phones among blood cells

April 24, 2010

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Tampa Bay Times — April 24, 2010 | Mark Albright

A shopping trip in the not-so-distant future promises to be a virtual reality version of a fully stocked store projected in 3D from eyeglasses to your retina.

“The cell phone is the gateway to everything. In 10 years it will be embedded in your belt,” said futurist Ray Kurzweil.

That was one of many predictions served up to chief marketing officers from 40 major retailers at a… read more

The Boston Phoenix | Is genius immortal? Tech god Ray Kurzweil is a modern-day Edison: now he’s battling to stay alive — forever

May 3, 2010

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The Boston Phoenix — May 3, 2010 | Chris Faraone

No disrespect to the man who let there be electric light, but Ray Kurzweil is Thomas Alva Edison on steroids. That might not be evident on a visitor’s first trip to his Kurzweil Technologies, a sleek yet modest office in Wellesley Hills, which is rather ordinary looking for the headquarters of a futurist who’s striving to live forever.

Still, the 62-year-old inventor is aware of the Edison comparisons, and… read more

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