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dw2 | The world’s most eminent sociologist highlights the technological singularity

February 20, 2013

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Source: dw2 — February 20, 2013 | David William Wood

Everyone should read the books of Ray Kurzweil, who has recently become an Engineering Director at Google. Kurzweil’s book makes it clear that: Within our lifetimes, human beings will no longer be human beings; there are multiple accelerating rates of change in several different disciplines; The three main disciplines contributing to the singularity are nanotech, AI, and biotech; All are transforming our understanding of the human body and,… read more

Singularity Hub | Ray Kurzweil for president (seriously?)

February 12, 2012

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Source: Singularity Hub — February 12, 2012 | Aaron Saenz

Ray Kurzweil has made a name for himself by forecasting important trends in consumer technology, global politics, and computer intelligence. Yet even Kurzweil couldn’t predict the latest disruptive event in his life: Ray’s running for U.S. President in 2012! Well…kind of.

The noted author, inventor, and futurist is a well known, and widely admired, figure in the Singularity community. He cofounded Singularity University, advocates the… read more

The Wall Street Journal | The Wall Street Journal | Man or machine? Ray Kurzweil on how long it will be before computers can do everything the brain can do

June 29, 2012

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Source: The Wall Street Journal — June 29, 2012

In a wide-ranging interview, Ray Kurzweil and The Wall Street Journal‘s Alan Murray discussed advances in artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, and what it means to be human.

They discussed pattern recognizers in our neocortex, machine intelligence (such as Watson), when machines will have human-level intelligence and consciousness (by 2029, the prospects and ethics of human-machine merger, and life extension.

The Wall Street Journal | Why you should bet big on bionic brains

November 23, 2012

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Source: The Wall Street Journal — November 23, 2012 | Matt Ridley

When an IBM computer program called Deep Blue defeated Garry Kasparov at chess in 1997, wise folk opined that since chess was just a game of logic, this was neither significant nor surprising. Mastering the subtleties of human language, including similes, puns and humor, would remain far beyond the reach of a computer.

Last year another IBM program, Watson, triumphed at just these challenges by winning… read more

The Wall Street Journal | Don’t fear the reaper

August 16, 2013

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Source: The Wall Street Journal — August 16, 2013 | John J. Ross

A sprightly tour among the scientists and enthusiasts who hope to live forever. The transhumanists hope to do an end-run around mortality by phasing out the weak links of flesh and blood. In the near future, brain scans will allow the wetware of the brain, our memories, our personalities, our prejudices and passions, to be uploaded into cyberspace.

We will flit from one cyborg body to another,… read more

The Wall Street Journal | Ray Kurzweil: Technology and the new, improved you

February 11, 2014

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Source: The Wall Street Journal — February 10, 2014

Ray Kurzweil says technology will make us smarter, healthier and more productive. Author, Google engineer and futurist Ray Kurzweil tells Wall Street Journal Editor in Chief Gerard Baker that advancing technologies will be integrated into ourselves.

He speaks at the Journal’s CIO Network conference in San Diego. Wall Street Journal Editor in Chief Gerard Baker spoke with Mr. Kurzweil about what the future holds.

Mr. Baker: Before we… read more

IT Conversations & Tech Nation | Podcast: Will biotech save us or hurt us? Ray Kurzweil debates Susan Greenfield at BioAgenda Summit 2006

March 28, 2006

Source: IT Conversations & Tech Nation — March 28, 2006 | Moira Gunn

IT Conversations | As part of the recent BioAgenda Summit 2006, Baroness Susan Greenfield, Director of the Royal Institution of Great Britain, debates Ray Kurzweil, one of America’s most prolific inventors and a futuristic thinker in his own right.

Their topic? One of the burning questions of our time: Will biotechnology save us? Or hurt us? The answers are nuanced, and they often don’t agree. We’ll find out how… read more

Related:
Tech Nation
IT Conversations
Wikipedia | Susan Greenfield
Oxford University | Susan Greenfield

The New York Times | Life goes on and on

December 17, 2011

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Source: The New York Times — December 17, 2011 | James Atlas

As an actuarial phenomenon, the reason isn’t hard to grasp. My friends are in their 60s now, some creeping up on 70; their mothers are in their 80s or 90s. Ray Kurzweil, the author of The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology,believes that we’re close to unlocking the key to immortality.

Perhaps within this century, he prophesies, “software-based humans” will be able to survive indefinitely on the Web,… read more

Jason Silva & Steven Mercado | New Six Epochs of Evolution infographic

March 11, 2012

The Six Epochs of Evolution by Jason Silva

Source: Jason Silva & Steven Mercado — March 11, 2012

Directions for viewing | To expand this image to full viewing sizing, click the [+] expand button in the upper, right-hand corner of the thumbnail image to open a larger, overlay image. In the overlay click the upper, right-hand corner again to expand to maximum size.

The new Six Epochs of Evolution image was done in collaboration with artist Steven Mercado, who… read more

GigaOM | It’s not Skynet yet: in machine learning there’s still a role for humans

March 20, 2013

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Source: GigaOM — March 20, 2013 | Ki Mae Heussner

If you’ve ever seen any of The Terminator films, you’re familiar with Skynet, the self-aware computing system at odds with humanity. But, even though a perception persists that machines can increasingly solve complex problems and process large amounts of data on their own, machine learning experts say humans still play a very important role.

Human intervention is critical at multiple layers, from choosing the algorithms to apply to… read more

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