Ray Kurzweil in the Press

A collection of both current and archived Ray Kurzweil press, radio and television interviews and appearances.

Magazine and newspaper articles on science and tech breakthroughs, controversies, and predictions – explored through the lens of leading journalists in discussions with Kurzweil and colleagues – and videos of Ray Kurzweil's TV interviews and public speaking.

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Radio Open Source | podcast — The end of work, with Ray Kurzweil, Andrew McAfee, Chris Lydon

July 27, 2014

Radio Open Source - The End of Work - one

Radio Open Source — July 27, 2014 | Christopher Lydon

The jobless economy: a fully automated, engineered, robotic system that doesn’t need you, or me either. Anything we can do, machines can do better — surgery, warfare, farming, finance. What’s to do? Shall we smash the machines, or go to the beach, or finally learn to play the piano?

Economists predict that 50% of US jobs could be automated in a decade or two. Big fun show with… read more

Daily Mail | We’ll be uploading our entire minds to computers by 2045 and our bodies will be replaced by machines within 90 years, Google expert claims

June 19, 2013

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Daily Mail — June 19, 2013 | Victoria Woollaston

Ray Kurzweil, director of engineering at Google, believes we will be able to upload our entire brains to computers within the next 32 years, an event known as singularity.

Our fragile human body parts will be replaced by machines by the turn of the century. And if these predictions comes true, it could make humans immortal.

In just over 30 years, humans will be able… read more

TED | What will be the most important driver of change in the future?

March 24, 2014

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TED — March 24, 2014

At TED 2014, we challenged attendees to vote on 10 potential drivers of change in the next 30 years. The range of opinions was vast and intriguing.

And what do you think? See how your thoughts match up with the rest of the TED community. Below, some relevant quotes from TED Talks. [...]

The New Yorker | How to live forever

February 22, 2015

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The New Yorker — February 22, 2015 | Tim Wu

Ray Kurzweil declared we may be uploading our brains by the 2030s. Assume, along with Stephen Hawking, PhD and Kurzweil, that it is plausible for the information in our heads to be digitized and stored somewhere else.

Perhaps a better approach for future Ray Kurzweils is not copying our brains but, rather, trying to migrate the self to a new physical host. Like a hermit crab seeking a new… read more

Inquisitr | Ray Kurzweil predicts some fantastic things coming in the next 25 years

February 1, 2015

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Inquisitr — February 1, 2015

Ray Kurzweil says by the 2020s most diseases will go away as nanobots become smarter than current medical tech. Normal eating will be replaced by nanosystems.

The Turing test — a test where artificial intelligence becomes indistinguishable from human intelligence — is passed

Self driving cars will take over roads, and people won’t be allowed to drive on highways.

He says by the 2030s, virtual reality will… read more

The Huffington Post | Ray Kurzweil, Google’s Director of Engineering, wants to bring the dead back to life

December 28, 2012

The Huffington Post — December 28, 2012

Inventor Ray Kurzweil hopes to develop ways for humans to live forever, and while he’s at it, bring back his dead father. Behind him is the support of a tech giant. This month, Kurzweil, a futurist, stepped into the role of Director of Engineering at Google, focusing on machine learning and language processing.

“There is a lot of suffering in the world,” Kurzweil once said, according… read more

Slashdot | Interviews: Ask Ray Kurzweil about the future of mankind and technology

January 28, 2013

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Slashdot — January 28, 2013

The recipient of nineteen honorary doctorates, and honors from three U.S. presidents, Ray Kurzweil’s accolades are almost too many to list. A prolific inventor, Kurzweil created the first CCD flatbed scanner, the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, and the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments.

His book, Theread more

Forbes | Do humans live too long?

July 16, 2014

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Forbes — July 16, 2014 | Michael Thomsen

Ray Kurzweil is perhaps the most famous immortalist, insisting there is no reason to believe death can’t be stopped or reversed, a feat that would only contribute to overall human productivity.

“Our initial reaction to hearing that someone has died is a profound loss of knowledge, skill, talents and relationships,” he said. “It’s not the case that there are only a fixed number of positions, and if old people… read more

Business Insider | Apple wants to use your heart rate and facial expressions to figure out what mood you’re in

January 24, 2014

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Business Insider — January 24, 2014 | Aaron Taube

Google futurist Ray Kurzweil is working to improve its search function to the point where humans could type in a sentence, and the computer could understand the query on an emotional level.

And earlier this month, Yahoo acquired Aviate, a company that organizes and searches for phone apps based on what it thinks you’ll be looking for at a certain time. [...]

Entrepreneur | Steve Wozniak, the future of AI is scary and very bad for people

April 13, 2015

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Entrepreneur — March 23, 2015 | Laura Entis

Apple co-founder and programming whiz Steve Wozniak added his own predictions about artificial intelligence’s detrimental impact on the future of humanity.

“Computers are going to take over from humans, no question,” he told the outlet. Recent tech advancements have convinced Steve Wozniak that writer Raymond Kurzweil — who believes machine intelligence will surpass human intelligence within the next few decades — is onto something.

related reading:read more

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