Robert A. Freitas Jr.

July 11, 2009

Robert A. Freitas Jr. is Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Molecular Manufacturing (IMM) in Palo Alto, California, and was a Research Scientist at Zyvex Corp. (Richardson, Texas), the first molecular nanotechnology company, during 2000-2004. He received B.S. degrees in Physics and Psychology from Harvey Mudd College in 1974 and a J.D. from University of Santa Clara in 1979. Freitas co-edited the 1980 NASA feasibility analysis of self-replicating space factories and in 1996 authored the first detailed technical design study of a medical nanorobot ever published in a peer-reviewed mainstream biomedical journal. More recently, Freitas is the author of Nanomedicine, the first book-length technical discussion of the potential medical applications of molecular nanotechnology and medical nanorobotics; the first two volumes of this 4-volume series were published in 1999 and 2003 by Landes Bioscience. His research interests include: nanomedicine, medical nanorobotics design, molecular machine systems, diamond mechanosynthesis (theory and experimental pathways), molecular assemblers and nanofactories, and self-replication in machine and factory systems.

Robert co-founded the Nanofactory Collaboration in 2006, then won the 2006 Guardian Award from Lifeboat Foundation, the 2007 Foresight Prize in Communication and the 2009 Feynman Prize in nanotechnology for theory.  He wrote the first two U.S. patents ever filed on diamond mechanosynthesis and serves on the Editorial Boards of 9 medical or nanotech journals.

Links:
Robert A. Freitas Jr. Home Page
See essays by this author:
Clottocytes: Artificial Mechanical Platelets
Death is an Outrage
How To Make a Nanodiamond: A Simple Tool for Positional Diamond Mechanosynthesis, and its Method of Manufacture
Interview with Robert A. Freitas Jr. Part 1
Interview with Robert A. Freitas Jr. Part 2
Lifeboat Foundation Nanoshield
Microbivores: Artificial Mechanical Phagocytes
Molecular Manufacturing: Too Dangerous to Allow?
Nanomedicine
Nanotechnology, Nanomedicine and Nanosurgery
Respirocytes
Robots in the bloodstream: the promise of nanomedicine
Say Ah
Tangible Nanomoney
The Gray Goo Problem
The Vasculoid Personal Appliance
See blog posts by this author:
What price freedom?
See selected books by this author:
Kinematic Self-Replicating Machines